How To Accept Credit Cards Online

So you’ve realized you want to start selling online. Good for you! The ecommerce market is certainly booming. But before you can start raking in the money, you probably have a few questions, like “how do I make a website?” and “how do I accept credit cards online?” Here’s the good news: There are plenty of software options and payment processors to choose from! The bad news? There are plenty of software options and payment processors to choose from. So how do you choose?

As always, there’s no one perfect solution for everyone. You need to know your business (and where you want to go with it) and have a rough idea of what you need. If you have no idea where to start, never fear! In this article, we’ll cover some of the basic considerations about accepting credit card payments online, as well as types of payment processors and how to accept credit card payments online with and without a website. We’ll also discuss some of our favorite solutions for ecommerce and provide resources to help you learn more.

5 Questions To Ask Before You Start

It’s really important, before you dive headlong into any kind of financial investment in your business, to sit down and make sure that you know what you want and what you need. I say that a lot, but with selling online it’s especially important to look before you leap because if you get any component of your setup wrong, redoing it will cost time and money.

So before anything, here are some questions to consider:

  1. How technologically savvy are you? Simply put, are you even able to build and maintain your website yourself? If you’re not exactly a technological wizard, your priority should be finding an easy-to-manage solution. You can also outsource tasks you can’t handle yourself, such as design or even data entry for the creation of products. Of course, if you have an ambitious idea and no ready-made solution exists, or you need a lot of customization, you might need a developer who can work with software APIs to create what you need. You can find freelance developers to help out as you go, but the more high-tech you go, obviously, the more you should consider having a full-time developer.
  2. Do you already have a website? If yes, do you like your website? Would you rather abandon it for a better site with more features? If you already have a site and don’t want to go through the effort of creating a new site to sell a handful of products, payment buttons or plug-ins are better options. If you don’t have a site or you don’t mind nixing your current site in favor of something better, shopping cart software might meet the brief nicely. But of course, you don’t need a website to accept payments online. We’ll talk about all of these options more below.
  3. What’s your budget? When it comes to numbers, you need to look at both upfront costs and monthly (or yearly) costs. How much can you spend at the outset, and how much do you expect to be able to afford on a monthly or annual basis? Keep in mind the more technically advanced your website, the more you can expect to pay to build and maintain it. Likewise, the busier your site — the more products you have and the more sales you make — the more you can expect to pay. Don’t forget the tangential costs, such as hiring a designer or a developer, or data entry, and of course, the costs of payment processing itself!
  4. What are you selling? Whether you’re offering digital goods, subscriptions/services, or retail products, look for service providers that cater to your industry so you don’t have to find creative workarounds. Many solutions are generalized for a broad array of merchants, but with add-ons and integrations to make them more tailored. You can also find payment processors and software that offer ready-made specialized solutions and service plans, such as micropayments for merchants who sell low-priced digital goods.
  5. How comfortable are you with handling security features? If you want to sell online, you have to make sure your website is secure. That means ensuring your site is PCI compliant. The more involved you are in the payments process and the more sensitive information your website handles, the more of a burden you are taking upon yourself. Fortunately, many payment processors and other software providers offer solutions to keep your customers’ information secure and reduce your PCI burden — in some cases, you may not need to do anything at all.

Once you’ve got the answers to these questions and a list of the features you need and want, it’s time to actually start looking at your options. One of your primary considerations should be finding a payment processor. However, depending on your business model, you might want to first look at what kind of ecommerce options work for you and then select a payment processor from the available options.

We’ll begin by talking about payment processors and go on to look at what other software or platforms you should explore.

Types Of Payment Processors

No matter how you go about finding a payment processor — choosing a standalone, going with the default processor included with your shopping cart, or choosing a recommended partner from a software provider — you need to consider what kind of business model the processor uses. If you’ve been here before and read any of my other articles, you know that I am talking about the difference between third-party payment processors versus traditional merchant accounts.

Traditional merchant accounts are very stable. It would take a clear violation of either your contract or card network rules in order to trigger an account termination, and you’re unlikely to encounter a hold on funds unless you’ve had a series of issues with chargebacks or fraudulent transactions. However, most merchant account providers expect you to have an established business and a monthly volume of $10,000 in credit card transactions. Plus, setting up a merchant account will typically take a few days. It could take longer depending on how many processors are on your short list and how much negotiation is required.

Third-party processors are not quite as stable as merchant accounts. That’s because instead of issuing separate accounts for each of their merchants, everything is lumped together in one giant, communal merchant account. It takes very little effort to apply for an account with one of these processors, and you can often get approved and set up to accept credit cards online within a day. Factor in no monthly minimum volume requirements and third-party processors provide a great way for new businesses to take payments. However, the trade-off is that you’ll face greater scrutiny and a higher risk for account holds or terminations, often with no warning. Check out our article on how to prevent merchant account hold and freezes to learn how to reduce your risk.

While third-party processors are riskier than merchant accounts, they are a great option for new businesses who don’t know what sort of volume they can expect and don’t have an established history. Even for established businesses, there are some advantages: namely, third-party processors offer predictable, flat-rate pricing, so you know exactly how much you’ll pay. The best merchant account providers typically offer interchange-plus pricing, which, while clear and transparent, doesn’t make it easy to accurately estimate processing because interchange rates vary.

It’s up to you to decide which type of processor is right for your business. I do want to point out that some software companies (ecommerce shopping carts, point of sale solutions, invoice platforms, and more) often build white-label payments into their solutions. These solutions can take the form of third-party processors or merchant accounts, so make sure you investigate before just going with the default processor. In addition to their native payment processing services, most ecommerce software providers support integrations with an assortment of merchant accounts and third-party payment processors.

Square is our top-pick for third-party payment processor. In addition to predictable, flat-rate pricing with no monthly fees or contracts, Square offers a whole suite of seamlessly integrated apps to address in-person and online sales at no charge at all. eCommerce transactions process at 2.9% + $0.30 each.

For merchant accounts, we recommend CDGcommerce, which offers flat-rate pricing and an interchange-plus option depending on the merchant’s payment volume. There are no monthly minimums and no contracts, just a $10 monthly fee. Low-volume merchants will pay 1.95% + $0.30 for most transactions, or 2.95% + $0.30 for premium, corporate, or international cards. Merchants who process more than $10,000/month are eligible for interchange-plus pricing with a 0.30% + $0.10 markup.

Does Your Payment Processor Include a Gateway?

If you want to accept credit card payments online, it’s not enough to find a credit card processor. You also need a gateway. As the name suggests, a gateway is an intermediary software program that transfers the payment data from your website to the customer’s bank to be approved or declined (and then routes the money to your merchant account).

Many payment processors offer gateways as part of their services. For example, PayPal, Square, and Stripe all offer gateways bundled with the rest of their services at no additional cost. CDGcommerce offers its Quantum gateway as part of its services for online merchants.

However, some processors will charge you a setup fee and/or a monthly fee for use of the gateway. While it’s fair and legitimate to charge for this service (especially if you’re being offered other discounts or freebies in exchange), there’s no reason for you to overpay, either. Make sure you know how much a gateway service will cost if it’s not offered for free.

While it’s rare to find a processor that doesn’t include some sort of gateway access, they do exist. In the event that you find yourself leaning toward one of these processors, you can find your own gateway. Authorize.net is nearly universally compatible and reasonably priced, which makes it a good option for most merchants. (Worth noting: CDGcommerce’s gateway, Quantum, also includes an Authorize.net emulation mode to maximize compatibility.)

Want to know more about how payment gateways figure into your ecommerce setup? Check out our article, The Complete Guide to Online Credit Card Processing With a Payment Gateway, for more information.

How To Accept Online Payments With A Website

A website is a pretty integral part of selling online (but it’s not 100% necessary — we’ll look at some alternatives in the next section). As mentioned above, the first question to consider is: Do I already have a website? Then ask yourself: Do I like that website, or would I rather start over completely? Fortunately, there are solutions for both of these scenarios. For existing sites, you can implement payment buttons or seek out a plug-in or extension that supports ecommerce.

Adding Payments To An Existing Site

best templates

If you’ve used a site builder such as WordPress, Weebly, Wix, or Squarespace, it’s fairly simple to implement online payments. Simply check out the sitebuilder’s available third-party apps, extensions, and plugins. If you already know which payment processor you want to use, you can search directly for an available add-on. Otherwise, you can browse and see what options are ready-made for you. These add-ons will allow you to securely collect payment information from your customers as well as manage the order fulfillment process. Do your research and go with solutions from your site builder rather than third parties, if possible. Check reviews of any plugins or extensions you add and make sure they are well supported and any glitches are fixed in a timely manner.

If you run a WordPress site, WooCommerce or Ecwid could be good starter options. WooCommerce is actually a free plug-in to add to your site, with a basic theme and your choice of payment processors. It’s a very modular setup, so you can choose from a mix of free and paid extensions that allow you to customize WooCommerce to your needs. That includes payment processors, subscription tools, the ability to create add-ons (such as gift wrap for products), and more. Most WooCommerce add-ons are charged on an annual basis, which could require more of an up-front investment than a monthly subscription, so be aware of this fact.

Ecwid is another plug-in designed for WordPress. However, it also works on an assortment of other website-building platforms, including Wix and Weebly, Ecwid does offer a free plan for businesses with 10 or fewer products, but for higher-tiered plans you’ll pay a monthly subscription fee. Ecwid supports a wide assortment of integrations, including payment gateways. With higher plan tiers, you also get access to expanded sales channels.

Wix and Weebly’s website builders can be used for blogging, personal portfolios, and any other purposes. They both offer online store modules. Online stores from Wix start at $20/month with no transaction fees and your choice of processors. Upgrading to an eCommerce plan is fairly simple from within the Wix dashboard and won’t require any substantial reworking. Simply add the “My Store” module to your dashboard, make the upgrade, and start creating products.

Finally, there’s Weebly. Square actually bought Weebly in the spring of 2018, so it’s possible we could see Weebly start to favor Square pretty heavily in the future. For now, though, Weebly’s online store plans start at $8/month (on a yearly plan), with a 3% transaction fee on top of your processing costs. The transaction fee drops off with higher-tier plans, leaving just the monthly fee.

The other way to add payments to an existing site is to look for a payment processor that supports customizable payment buttons. A good payment button creator will give you power over the appearance of the buttons as well as the settings for transactions. The obvious, go-to solution for many is PayPal, which offers a pretty powerful array of tools. PayPal’s buttons are a good option whether you are selling a single product or multiple ones. You can set up payment buttons to allow products to be added to a cart or to go directly to checkout. PayPal even allows nonprofits to create a “Donate” button for their site, which can be configured for one-time and recurring donations.

An alternative to PayPal is Shopify Lite, an entry-level solution. For $9/month plus transaction costs (2.9% + $0.30), you can accept payments on your website by adding payment buttons. The plan also includes access to Shopify’s mPOS app and the ability to sell on Facebook (we’ll talk about that option in the next section, too.) And it’s worth mentioning that Ecwid also supports the creation of custom buy buttons.

While adding payments to an existing site is incredibly convenient and often requires little work, you won’t get quite as many tools as you would with a hosted ecommerce software solution. Which brings us to the best solution if you would rather build a new site or have no website to start with:

Building A New Site With Shopping Cart Software

eCommerce software apps, sometimes also called shopping carts or shopping cart software, are hosted, all-in-one solutions to online sales. Adding an ecommerce feature to an existing website requires you to choose a platform, buy the domain, and pay for hosting, but with shopping carts, you’ll get everything in a single package: online sales and product management, hosting, and sometimes even the ability to buy a domain name directly. Typically, shopping carts will also help you centralize control of sales across multiple channels, so that if you sell on social media, on eBay, or through another channel, you can handle order fulfillment through a single platform. That even includes buying postage (at a discounted rate) and printing the shipping labels. Some shopping carts will offer marketing tools or integrations with marketing platforms, as well as integrations with point of sale systems.

As far as payment processing goes, some shopping carts have opted to include their own white-label payments as a default part of their services. One such cart is Shopify, which offers its own Shopify Payments service (read our review). However, this is just a white-label version of Stripe. Be aware that choosing a payment processor other than the default can incur additional fees.

Generally speaking, even if a shopping cart doesn’t offer all of the features you want, you can search the app market for available extensions and integrations to get what you need. It’s worth researching the available add-ons as well as the native software features.

There’s a lot to consider and compare with a shopping cart. Obviously, you can use a sitebuilder such as Weebly or Wix, which both offer eCommerce modules. Then there are ecommerce-exclusive platforms, including Shopify and BigCommerce, which make it easy to build your site and customize the design (and even offer blogging so you can centralize control of your website).

If you want a whole lot of freedom and have coding knowledge, an open-source platform such as Magento might be more to your liking. Open-source platforms tend to be chock-full of specialized features (particularly if they have attracted active user communities) and you have almost limitless control of your site. A closed-source, SaaS platform is certainly a lot easier and more convenient for business owners who are just starting out and want to go the DIY route.

If you aren’t sure what you want, we recommend you start by checking out Shopify and BigCommerce, both of which are affordably priced for new businesses and offer extensive customer support resources. They also both offer multi-channel sales manage so you can sell through your own site and through other platforms but manage all of your orders from a single portal.

If you’re still curious about what makes a great ecommerce platform, check out some of our other resources!

  • The Beginner’s Guide to Starting an Online Store (eBook)
  • Shopping Cart Flowchart: Choose the Right eCommerce Software for Your Business (Infographic)
  • Shopping Carts 101: How to Choose a Shopping Cart for Your Business (Article)
  • Questions to Ask Before You Commit to a Shopping Cart (Article)

Managing Services, Subscriptions & Other Recurring Charges

A lot of merchants, from accountants and other professional service provideres to lawn care and cleaning services, could benefit from being able to automate recurring charges. And of course, the ability to automate charges is essential for SaaS providers and subscription-box sellers.

Generally speaking, the ability to accept recurring payments — for monthly services or subscriptions — isn’t a default option for payment processors or shopping carts, which tend to be retail-focused. However, you can find plenty of solutions that will work with your existing eCommerce setup. For example, Stripe and Braintree both offer extensive subscription management tools along with their payment gateway and processing services. Add-on services such as Chargify, Recurly, and ChargeBee work with a variety of processors. Zoho Subscriptions and Freshbooks also offer recurring billing tools. PayPal offers recurring billing tools for its merchants; Square offers “recurring invoices” but not a lot of advanced customization for subscription billing.

Proper research will be very important when selecting a provider that offers all of the features you need, whether you require metered billing for usage-based online services, the ability for customers to upgrade to a higher tiered plan mid-billing cycle, the ability to offer free trial periods and extend them, or a way to calculate taxes. Tools that automatically update expired cards can also help reduce failed charges and therefore improve revenues and reduce customer loss.

Accepting Online Payments Without A Website

Most people equate taking payments online with having a website. That is the most common option, but you don’t actually need your own website. Let’s talk about a few of the alternatives for how to accept credit cards online.

Creating Online Invoices

You could create your own invoices in Microsoft Office and send them out via email, but then you’ve got to keep track of which invoices have been sent and which have been paid — and you’ve still got to deal with waiting for the check in the mail. Online invoicing solutions can eliminate every single one of these hassles.

Generally speaking, invoicing software is cloud-based, so you can access it anywhere. You can customize invoices and send them via email (or generate a shareable link to the invoice). But unlike old-fashioned invoicing, these invoices include a link to pay directly in the invoice. Your customers follow the link, enter their payment details, and bam! You get paid much quicker.

Depending on which invoicing software you choose, you can get some powerful features. For example, PayPal allows you to enable partial payments on an invoice if you are willing to accept installment payments. Square’s invoicing links up with the platform’s customer database, allowing you to send recurring invoices and even store customer cards on file to make getting paid even easier. Zoho Invoice, which starts at $0/month, also allows for a customer database, as well as project management (so you can generate an invoice based on the number of hours worked). Shopify offers invoice creation within its platform at no additional charge as well — and this feature is even available on the Lite plan.

For most merchants, Square Invoices may be the most appealing, as it’s available with a Square account at no additional charge. However, Shopify’s built-in invoicing will work for merchants who want to sell with or without a website. Merchants who need project management as part of their invoicing should look at Zoho Invoice.

Using Online Form Builders

So you don’t have a website, but you still need to collect user information and accept payment. Online form builders offer an easy way to do both. Plus, you can post links to forms on social media or send them out via email.

Off the top of your head, you might think of Google Forms, which is free to use and quite advanced for a freemium software. However, it doesn’t integrate seamlessly with payment processors. Your best option, in this case, would be to use PayPal’s embeddable buy buttons and include the button in the form’s submission confirmation page as a second step. However, you’ll have to manually reconcile the payment records versus form submissions.

Subscription-based form builders will cost you money but offer far more capabilities than Google Forms, including direct integrations with payment processors/gateways such as PayPal, Stripe, Square, and Authorize.net. Subscriptions generally work on annual or monthly plans, but one option, Cognito Forms, offers an entry-level plan that charges 1% of the transaction amount instead. (Note, that’s in addition to any processing fees.) Other form solutions worth looking into are Zoho Forms and Jotform. Zoho Forms starts at $10/month and includes unlimited forms and up to 10,000 submissions. It integrates with both PayPal and Stripe. Jotform’s paid plans start at $19/month and are limited to 1,000 submissions, but include integrations for quite a few payment processors, including PayPal, Stripe, Square, and even Dwolla. Cognito Forms’ paid plans start at $10/month plus 1% of the transactions and include up to 2,000 form submissions. Integrations include PayPal and Stripe.

And we haven’t even talked about event registration sites. There are a lot of them, but the one many people are likely familiar with is EventBrite. EventBrite allows you to put all the details of your event online and sell tickets — including setting multiple tiers of admission and promotion cards, automatically setting price changes for registration deadlines, and so on. You can even collect marketing data about your patrons, from their zip codes to how they heard about the event. Your event is searchable from within the EventBrite platform, allowing people searching for something to do to discover your event as well. EventBrite does charge fees on top of processing costs, but these can actually be passed onto event registrees, saving you some money at least.

Selling On Social Media

It wasn’t all that long ago that the idea of being able to buy products directly through social media channels was novel and experimental, but nowadays you can create your own online shop through Facebook, or sell on Instagram or even Pinterest.

With Facebook, you just need a Facebook business page to get started. You can choose your payment processor (PayPal or Stripe) and start manually uploading products, all of which have to be reviewed by Facebook before they can go live. An easier option is to link your Facebook shop to an online store builder such as BigCommerce, Ecwid, or Shopify.

Shopify is actually an interesting solution because, while its core offering is an online shopping cart, it offers a “Lite” plan for $9/month that includes access to its mPOS app, buy buttons for a website, and a Facebook store with automated tools to make the process easier. You wouldn’t necessarily have to go through the hassle of building a website with Shopify just to sell on Facebook, but you still get more tools than you would by going through Facebook directly. Check out our Shopify Lite review for an in-depth look at the plan and all its features.

Selling on Instagram requires you to have a Facebook shop (because Facebook owns Instagram) to create what it calls “Shoppable posts.” That shop can be managed directly via Facebook itself, or via Shopify or BigCommerce as one of multiple sales channels. I’d like to point out that Instagram isn’t available as a sales channel with the Lite plan; you’ll need to upgrade to Shopify Basic at $29/month to be able to manage sales via Instagram.

Lastly, Pinterest allows merchants with a business account to create “Buyable pins,” so you can sell from your Pinterest page. Unlike Facebook, where you can manage the buyable pins from the platform, to sell through Pinterest you will need to go through either Shopify or BigCommerce and actually apply for approval before you can start selling.

Shopify Lite is an ideal option if you want to start with Facebook and maybe add buy buttons to a website. You can upgrade to Shopify Basic ($29/month) to get your own site, plus access to Instagram and Pinterest if that appeals to you.

Selling In Marketplaces

Online marketplaces are a good alternative to having your own website if you’re selling retail goods. You don’t have to pay for hosting or invest anything in web design. You simply create your product listings using the tools provided and publish them. Marketplaces allow you to get your products in front of a large audience without you having to build a stream of traffic yourself. However, the trade-offs are that you generally pay more in fees (listing fees, seller’s fees, and payment processing) than you would with your own website, and you have zero control over the design of the site or even how your products are displayed. Generally speaking, you are limited to using whatever payment processing the marketplace offers as well.

A few popular marketplaces include:

  • eBay
  • Etsy
  • Amazon
  • Jet (owned by Walmart)
  • Ruby Lane

Accepting Payments Through Virtual Terminals 

The final alternative is a bit of a stretch, I’ll admit, but it can be a powerful tool for some merchants. A virtual terminal is a web portal where you can manually enter credit card information to process a transaction. (There’s the stretch: VTs require an internet connection, so they’re technically online payments.)  Virtual terminals are a necessity for merchants who want to accept payments over the phone (or even by mail).

Some payment processors offer a virtual terminal as part of their software package, others as an add-on. These providers include PayPal, Payline Mobile, Square, and Fattmerchant. However, if you want the best value for a virtual terminal, we recommend Square. You pay only the payment processing costs (3.5% + $0.15) and it is interoperable with the rest of Square’s platform.

Beyond Credit Cards: Alternative Online Payment Methods

Credit cards are the go-to for accepting payments online, but they aren’t the only options. For starters, there are ACH bank transfers, which are generally less expensive for merchants to process. They’re often preferred in B2B environments, but some consumers favor them too.

Offering ACH processing as an additional option, especially if you’re in the B2B space, could win you more customers. According to a 2017 Payment Benchmarks Survey by the Credit Research Foundation and the National Automated Clearing House Association (NACHA), ACH transfers currently account for 32 percent of B2B transactions, lagging behind checks, which took the no. 1 spot at 50 percent. Credit cards account for just 11 percent of B2B transactions. By 2020, the survey estimates that ACH will take the top spot and account for 45 percent of B2B transactions.

Despite this, most merchant accounts or even third-party processors don’t offer ACH by default. Some offer it as an add-on plan, others may require you to look for a supplemental option for ACH acceptance.

ACH is far from the only option as far as “alternative” payment processing now, too. Mobile wallets are bridging the gap between in-person and online payments, and card networks have implemented their own online checkout options for cardholders. The major advantage to accepting these options is that they offer an extra layer of security for consumers. For example, Apple Pay on the web still requires biometric authentication before approval.

Some of these alternative payment methods include:

  • Apple Pay on the Web
  • Google Pay
  • Microsoft Pay
  • Chase Pay
  • MasterPass
  • Visa Checkout
  • Amex Express checkout

Apple Pay and Google Pay are fairly widely supported, but you may not see the other options on this list everywhere.

Two noteworthy providers that offer ACH, as well as other alternative payment options, are Stripe and Braintree. However, both are developer-focused platforms, so you’ll need someone with the technical know-how to implement them. Merchant accounts that specialize in eCommerce and provide a solid gateway might offer these options too.

We recommend Stripe because of its extensive developer tools, customizable checkout, and resources for recurring billing. The company also offers round-the-clock customer support (an admittedly recent addition to its feature set). Plus, Stripe is great for international merchants who want to be able to accept localized currencies in Europe and Asia.

Begin Accepting Payments Online

Starting an online store and learning how to accept credit cards online can seem like a daunting task! There are so many factors to consider, but I hope I’ve been able to shed some light on the process and point you in the direction of some good options. A merchant account can give you security and stability, but it may not be the most cost-effective option for low-volume merchants. A third-party processor can get you set up quickly with predictable pricing that often favors low-volume merchants, but the trade-off is account stability. And of course there’s the matter of compatibility: You need to make sure that whatever payment processor you choose offers a gateway compatible with the software (and sales channels) you want to use.

But you also need to have a good idea of what you can afford to spend up front and on a monthly basis and understand your limitations when it comes to technology and software. If you want to go the DIY route, you’ll need to be fairly tech-savvy. Otherwise, be prepared to outsource tasks to designers, developers, and even admin assistants. Some software solutions make it incredibly easy to do everything yourself, others will require lots of hands-on effort to make them work.

If you’re still not sure where to go from here, we recommend you check out our article: The Best Online Credit Card Payment Processing Companies. You can also view our merchant account comparison chart for a quick look at our favorite providers.

Have questions? We’re always happy to hear from our readers, so please leave us a comment!

The post How To Accept Credit Cards Online appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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SBA Disaster Loans: Do I Qualify For One?

Whether your area was affected by a wildfire, tornado, record-setting hurricane or another catastrophic event, the next steps can feel daunting or overwhelming. Many homes and businesses find that insurance won’t cover as much as they thought—and that leaves a large gap between where they are now and the ability to move forward with everyday life as usual.

Thankfully, there is an option to finance the funds needed to rebuild—funds that can help not only business owners, but homeowners as well. Offering no upfront fees, no penalties for paying off the loan early, and low interest rates, an SBA disaster loan can help you begin to put the pieces back together after a life-altering event.

What Are SBA Disaster Loans?

While the primary mission of the Small Business Administration is to support entrepreneurs, with special programs focused on women, veterans, low-income, and minority business owners, this agency also offers low-interest loans to assist business owners, homeowners, and renters after a disaster. No matter where you fall in the insurance spectrum — whether you’re covered well, are underinsured, or have no protections — FEMA recommends applying for an SBA loan to cover gaps in insurance coverage or to provide bridge funding before the insurance check arrives.

Read on to find out more about the types of SBA disaster loans and to find the option that fit your situation best. It’s time to get the financing you need to recover your business and your life.

Business Economic Injury Disaster Loans

The Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program (EIDL) provides financial assistance to both small businesses and private, non-profit organizations that are located in a declared disaster area. Coverage depends on the amount of economic injury sustained but isn’t necessarily calculated by the actual physical damage to the business. Coverage for an economic injury disaster loan is capped at $2 million dollars, but the amount you can finance is based on the actual economic injury you’ve sustained after a disaster. So if sales have dipped because people simply can’t get to your storefront location, or the area was closed but your property isn’t damaged, for instance, an economic injury disaster loan may be able to help you cover costs associated with loss of business.

Am I Eligible For The Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program?

To be eligible for an economic injury disaster loan through the SBA, you’ll need to be located in a disaster-declared country or contiguous county. This type of loan is open to private organizations or small business owners who have sustained economic injury because of the declared disaster. In addition, repayment terms will be dependent on your ability to repay the loan.

Your first step in learning more is to visit the SBA’s Disaster Loan Assistance page where you can look up eligible disaster areas, apply online, and check your application status. Read on to learn more about the qualifications and other frequently asked questions in the proceeding sections below.

Business Physical Disaster Loans

If your business has sustained physical damage in a declared disaster area, you can apply for a physical disaster loan to receive the financial assistance you need to move ahead. There is no business too small or too large to apply—and most nonprofit organizations may also be eligible for an SBA loan to help rebuild after a disaster strikes.

Repayment terms can be flexible and will depend on your ability to repay the loan. Your repayment period can be up to 30 years with an interest rate that will not exceed 4% if you cannot obtain credit with another source and no more than 8% for those who have available credit options elsewhere.

How Can I Tell If My Area Is A Declared Disaster?

To check all currently declared disasters and determine if you can apply for disaster loan assistance, visit the U.S. Small Business Administration webpage for more information. You’ll find a listing of states, incidents, and affected incident periods.

If you know you are in a declared disaster area and you have sustained physical damage to your business, the next steps you need to take are to visit the SBA site and begin the application process for disaster loan assistance.

What Can An SBA Physical Disaster Loan Be Used For?

Business physical disaster loans from the SBA “must help return damaged property to its pre-disaster condition through repairs or replacements.” Funds can be used to purchase or repair machinery, equipment, fixtures, inventory, and of course, building improvements—anything at your physical location that was damaged by the disaster.

Home & Physical Property Disaster Loans

As mentioned at the beginning of the post, the SBA typically focuses on supporting the entrepreneur through small business growth. However, if you’re a homeowner or renter in a declared disaster area, you may also find help to rebuild from the U.S. Small Business Administration. The SBA offers home and property disaster loans—affordable financial assistance in the form of long-term, low-interest loans for any loss that isn’t covered by your insurance or other coverage means.

How Much Can I Borrow?

To repair your home to its pre-disaster state, you can borrow up to $200,000—but you won’t be able to use this as working capital to upgrade or make additions to your home unless these are required by a building authority or code update.

In addition to repairing structures, you also might be able to borrow up to $40,000 to replace your personal property such as clothes, furniture, or other contents in your home. You can’t use the funds to replace antiques, collections, a pleasure watercraft, or recreational vehicles, however.

If you are a homeowner or renter who needs to rebuild in a declared disaster area, this option from the SBA can be the boost needed to move ahead.

What Types Of Businesses Are Eligible For SBA Disaster Loans?

buying a franchise

Below are some of the more common questions relating to eligibility for an SBA disaster loan. While the SBA certainly has guidelines and eligibility requirements, there is hope even if you don’t have a lot of collateral or you have some past credit issues.

Is My Business Eligible For A Disaster Loan?

In addition to your business being located in an officially declared disaster area, there are some other guidelines to keep in mind when it comes to eligibility. Most of the qualifications to receive an SBA loan are covered in the answers to the most commonly asked questions below, but in a nutshell, it’s going to come down to your location, creditworthiness, ability to repay, and collateral.

More About The SBA Disaster Loan Process

Does The SBA (Or FEMA) Perform Credit Checks?

Yes, to obtain a disaster loan you will need to demonstrate a history of creditworthiness. The SBA will perform a credit check. If you’re worried that your lack of credit history will deter you from getting the funds you need, take heart –there’s another route to demonstrating your ability to pay. The SBA will examine your history of paying utilities, rent, or insurance as positive evidence that you can repay.

It’s a wise move to know your credit score before you apply, so you can be prepared. Take advantage of some of the best free places to check your credit and stay informed.

What About Disaster Relief Loans For Bad Credit?

As stated above, the SBA will perform a credit check on your accounts. While you need to show you have regularly made payments on accounts, you don’t need to be too concerned if you have a few negative marks on your credit report, as long as the majority of your accounts are in good standing with the reporting agencies.

Do I Need Collateral?

If you need more than $25,000, the SBA will likely require collateral to secure your loan. Typically, they will accept real estate or other assets to secure your loan, but don’t be too discouraged if you don’t have collateral. If you are otherwise eligible for an SBA economic injury loan and have no collateral to provide, for instance, you may simply be required to pledge what is available instead of being denied. The program is set up to be as accessible as possible, so you will be considered whether you have collateral or not.

How are Disasters Declared?

Only businesses located in an officially declared disaster area can access SBA disaster loans. Generally, there are seven ways a disaster can be declared:

  1. A Presidential Declaration for Individual Assistance is requested by the governor of a state. The presidential declaration activates FEMA and will automatically make SBA disaster loans accessible to businesses and private, non-profit organizations.
  2. An Administrative Agency Declaration can be made by the governor of the state to activate SBA’s disaster loan program available to businesses, homeowners, and renters alike.
  3. A Presidential Declaration for Public Assistance can also be requested by the governor. Once the President approves, business physical damage and economic injury loans are made available.
  4. The Secretary of Agriculture can declare a disaster area. The SBA will then also declare the availability of disaster loans relating to businesses engaged in agriculture.
  5. A Governor Certification Declaration occurs when a governor goes to the SBA directly and requests a declaration based on certification of the damages an area has.
  6. The Secretary of Commerce may determine that some eligible small businesses have economic injury directly related to commercial fishery failures or resource disasters.
  7. A Military Reservist Declaration can be made for individuals who are considered “essential employees” and are called up to active duty as military reservists during a period of military conflict. Working capital loans can be made available to businesses that aren’t able to meet ordinary and necessary operating expenses due to the absence of essential employees.

SBA Disaster Loan Terms & Rates

The table below will give you a quick peek of terms and rates for the two business-focused SBA disaster loans—the economic injury disaster loan and the business physical disaster loan.

SBA Disaster Loan Application Process

As mentioned above, your first step in the application process for an SBA disaster loan is to fill out an application at the Disaster Loan Assistance portal through the SBA. Here you will be able to verify whether you’re in a disaster area, apply online (or find the phone numbers you need), and check on your application once it’s been submitted.

When you’re trying to recover from a disaster and start rebuilding, time is of the essence. This is why it’s important to begin gathering the documents you’ll need to keep things moving forward:

  • Start making an itemized list of your losses
  • Include the estimate to repair or replace items
  • Obtain a copy of the necessary federal document (income tax information) that is referenced in the application
  • Provide a brief history and overview of your business
  • Gather business and personal financial statements

The good news is that, unlike a typical SBA loan, funding for a Disaster Loan can be completed in as little as 7-21 days. You may receive your funds in increments as you begin repairing to cover necessary costs.

Need An Alternative To Federal Disaster Loans?

If you’re forced to seek alternatives to an SBA loan, you’ll find you do have other options. Whether the SBA is denying disbursement or you simply want to shop around and find the best financing options for your particular situation, check out our Small Business Loans Comparison Page for more information. With an online loan, you may be able to get your funds faster, you’ll want to pay attention to rates and repayment terms; these will typically be less attractive than what the SBA can offer.

After a disaster, you may feel that you’re treading water for a while. Fortunately, with the help of disaster assistance loans, you do have hope and resources to make progress again. Follow the references listed above to learn more and start the healing and recovery process.

The post SBA Disaster Loans: Do I Qualify For One? appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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SBA Loan Requirements: What You Need To Know About Qualifying For SBA Loans

There are many reasons why a business owner might be in need of the extra support provided by an SBA (small business administration) loan. Whether you’re looking to expand your business across your state, you need equipment to begin operations, or you’re facing an unexpected setback, it’s always nice to have access to additional cash to keep moving ahead. SBA loans are backed by the government—and that means that the lenders who participate in the program have a guarantee on some portion of the loan. This guarantee by the Small Business Administration represents less risk for the lender and that means greater accessibility to business funds for you. With any type of SBA financing, you will enjoy lower rates and longer repayment terms with a variety of loan sizes.

There are several financing options available to entrepreneurs and small business owners via special programs backed by the Small Business Association. Below you’ll find out what to expect when it comes to SBA loan requirements, as well as an overview of each type of SBA loan.

Types Of SBA Loans

SBA 7(a)

The SBA 7(a) loan is the most common SBA loan. It can be used for nearly any business-related expense and is an excellent way to get the working capital you need to buy property, boost inventory, or even purchase another business. The versatile SBA 7(a) loan covers the broad needs most business owners face, including refinancing business debt. The maximum loan amount for the SBA 7(a) is $5 million. The SBA guarantees a whopping 75% – 85% of a traditional 7(a) loan, making it one of the most desirable SBA loan types. Loan terms vary depending on your loan, but generally, you’ll have up to 25 years for real estate loans and 10 years for all other loan types. Loan approval can take several weeks, so if you’re in a hurry, you’re better off with an SBA Express Loan.

SBA Express Loan

Just like a 7(a), an SBA Express loan can give you the capital you need — but with fewer hoops to jump through. Boasting a fraction of the turnaround time you’d get with a typical SBA 7(a) loan, an SBA express loan can be approved in less than a week. If time is of the essence, this may be the right choice for you. The structure of the loan, and the purposes for which the loan can be used, for are nearly the same for 7(a) and Express Loan products. However, SBA Express Loans max out at $350,000 — and are only backed by the Small Business Administration by 50%. Due to the speed and accessibility of Express Loans, and the higher risk involved for the loan issuer, interest rates are higher. SBA 7(a) loans have better rates but more stringent qualifications, so if you have an investment deal that’s too good to pass up or you just need working capital sooner rather than later, the SBA Express is a good option to have.

CAPLines

A CAPLine loan is an SBA loan that can supplement your revenue cycle with revolving lines of credit. Use this loan for a builders line of credit, contract financing, general working capital needs, and/or any seasonal needs you face. According to SBA regional District Director, Terri Dennison, “Firms with significant fluctuations in cash flow over the course of the business cycle can benefit as well.” For a business with sales that ebb and flow through the year, this type of loan can keep things running smoothly.

504 Certified Development Company Loan Program

For the business owner who has trouble obtaining traditional mortgage financing, the 504 Certified Development Company Loan Program offers a beacon of hope. You can still enjoy a competitive, fixed-rate mortgage financing option with the help of an SBA lender and a certified development company. A 504 Loan allows you to not only buy the land you need but also renovate real estate and purchase needed heavy equipment for your operations. You can get a loan amount of up to 40% of the total project cost, with a cap of $5 to $5.5 million, depending on your business type.

SBA Microlenders

If you’re almost at your financial goal and don’t require a larger loan, an SBA Microlender can help! Business owners who need $500 to $50,000 can get funds to purchase equipment, furniture, supplies, and working capital. Not only that, you can enjoy free business consulting from the SBA microlenders to help you focus on the right goals for financial success.

Disaster Loan Assistance

Regardless of business size, the SBA provides loans to those who require immediate access to funds after a disaster. Whether you need funds to repair or replace damaged items, for machinery or equipment, inventory, business assets, or other types of business expenses, business owners can get low-interest loans to meet these pressing needs when disaster strikes.

Basic SBA Loan Requirements

For the most part, you’ll find that SBA loan requirements are going to be similar across the spectrum of loan products. There are certain umbrella guidelines that cover most SBA loans — for example, most SBA loan products will require businesses to be for-profit, and meet certain size requirements (to be considered a “small business”). Below are some notes to keep in mind when it comes to navigating the different types of SBA loan options.

SBA 7(a) Loan Requirements

The SBA 7(a) may be the most popular of all the SBA loans, but that isn’t to say it’s the fastest or easiest—especially if your business is a startup. However, if you understand that the process can take several weeks and have a good working knowledge of the steps involved, you can avoid some setbacks (and frustrations) along the way.

The first thing to know about SBA 7(a) loan requirements is that you must demonstrate good to excellent credit (at least 600, in general), adequate collateral, and solid cash flow right off the bat. All of this can be accomplished by providing cash flow statements, balance sheets, and income statements with your application. Detailed accounting practices and a solid business plan are your best assets here. If numbers simply aren’t your strong point, get support from a consultant or accountant to help you build a stronger case for your business.

You’ll need to also do the work and prove you have the business management experience over the long haul—after all, this is a long-term business loan. The business plan you present will need to have detailed analysis and projections for the next several years. Utilizing charts and graphs to create a visual case of success will be to your advantage.

SBA 7(a) loans of less than $25,000 do not require collateral. However, to obtain a bigger loan, putting up business collateral will definitely strengthen your case. If you don’t have any collateral, there are other ways to show you are a good candidate, like providing a solid business plan and having excellent credit, as outlined above.

A down payment is an SBA 7(a) loan requirement in certain cases. If you are going to use the loan to buy another business, equipment, or real estate, you’ll need to put at least 10-20% down to qualify.

SBA Express Loan Requirements

The requirements for an SBA Express Loan are significantly less strict than they are for a traditional SBA 7(a) loan, though the tradeoff is higher rates. The things that are going to ultimately matter the most when qualifying for an Express loan are your cash flow (or projected cash flow) as well as your prowess in managing your business. Also up for consideration are things like your credit score and how long you’ve been in business. In general, you’ll need a credit score of 680 or higher to qualify for an Express Loan.

As far as the documents you’ll need to fill out in order to qualify for your loan, you’ll work through a checklist of required forms, including a Borrower Information Form, a Statement of Personal History, and an Agreement of Compliance (if more than $10,000 in loan funds are being used for construction).

CAPLine Loan Requirements

As outlined above, the low rates of CAPLines can help you with your cyclical financing needs. Some of the minimum requirements of an SBA CapLine Loan requirements are below:

  • You must have a credit score of 660
  • You’ll have to pledge future or current accounts receivable, contracts, inventories, purchase orders, or more as collateral for your loan
  • Your business must be at least one year old
  • You need to be able to identify an accurate seasonal pattern of revenue

As with the other types of SBA loans, keeping organized records of all of your finances and monitoring your credit score will support your efforts in qualifying for a CAPLine loan from the SBA.

504 Loan Requirements

If you are looking to finance land or heavy equipment, and are considering the SBA 504 loan, here are some additional requirements you need to be aware of when it comes to getting approved:

  • As the owner, 51% of your building must be occupied by your business
  • Your credit score will need to be over 660
  • Your business’s net worth must be less than $15 million
  • You must be able to pay 10% or more of the project costs for the down payment

Additionally, you’ll need to show your ability to repay the loan, on time, from your operating cash flow. This means that you need to have your business plan and projected cash flow all clearly mapped out for your lender.

It’s also a good idea to check your credit score before getting the process started to address any inconsistencies that may ding your credit. Make sure all of your accounts are current and that you haven’t defaulted on any loans.

SBA Microloan Loan Requirements

As you would to qualify for any SBA loan, you’ll need to share a solid business plan and have a clear map to fiscal victory. The requirements for a microloan, however, differ in a few key ways to requirements for other SBA loans. Because SBA Microloans cap out at much smaller amounts, the maximum repayment time you’ll have is around six years, significantly less time than you’ll have with other types of loans—keep that in mind when you’re considering your options. Additionally, the loan may be on a smaller scale, but you’ll still need to show you have good credit. Collateral is also generally required.

The good news is that both established companies and startups are eligible for SBA Microloans, and though you need to show you have good personal credit, a limited credit history will not be a roadblock for you. If your credit is less than stellar, having a cosigner will strengthen your qualifications.

Disaster Loan Requirements

To receive a disaster loan that’s backed by the SBA, a business must have physical or economic damage that’s caused by an identified disaster. This means that your area will have to be officially designated a declared disaster area by the SBA. If your business is in recovery mode and you need assistance in rebuilding, you’ll also need to meet minimum requirements.

Like you would with any other SBA loans, you’ll need to have good credit. Though there is no specific hard-and-fast score requirement here, you must show you have an acceptable history free of bankruptcy, tax liens, and foreclosures. If you have suffered economic or physical loss from the SBA-identified event, additional qualifications will also be guided by the actual damage to your business.

Ready To Get An SBA Loan?

If you meet the qualifications outlined above, you can begin the application process on the SBA website. That said, we recommend applying to SmartBiz, an online lender that can expedite the SBA loan process, which is traditionally slow.

If you don’t qualify for an SBA loan, or just want to compare business loans, visit this handy comparison chart to learn about more options available to you. The takeaway here is that you have options—use the above resources to move ahead with your business goals this upcoming year.

Before you get started, make sure to check out the current SBA loan rates.

The post SBA Loan Requirements: What You Need To Know About Qualifying For SBA Loans appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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SBA Express Loans: Your Guide To Terms, Fees, and Eligibility

If you’re a small business owner looking for a faster way to get the cash you need to move your business ahead, an SBA Express Loan may be the right choice for you. When considering a loan (or any business decision), it’s best to understand what to expect ahead of time. Read on to find out more about the SBA Express Loan—and how to get the ball rolling if you decide that’s the right option for you.

Compare Your Options: SBA Express Loans vs. SBA 7(a) Loans

Before digging too deep into SBA Express Loans, let’s clarify that this option is a little different than the typical SBA loan. When we talk about SBA Express Loans vs. traditional 7(a) Loans, the biggest differences are the amounts you can finance and the time it takes you to get the funds you need.

Just like any other type of SBA loan, an SBA Express loan is a long-term loan that you can put to use on almost any expense for your business. An SBA Express Loan, like an SBA 7(a), is backed by the government—and that means that the lenders who participate in the program have a guarantee on some portion of the loan. This guarantee by the Small Business Administration represents less risk for the lender and that means greater accessibility to business funds for you. With any type of SBA financing, you will enjoy lower rates and longer repayment terms with a variety of loan sizes.

There are critical differences between SBA loan products, however, as mentioned above. 

How Much Can I Borrow With The SBA Express Loan?

You can borrow up to $350,000 with an SBA Express Loan. As the name implies, the turnaround time is faster with an SBA Express Loan than with a traditional 7(a) Loan—so if time is of the essence and you need money fast, this type of SBA business loan may be a lifesaver. You could get loan approval from the SBA in as little as 24 – 36 hours (however, approval from the bank will still take several more weeks or months).

The SBA 7(a) loan is also a great option if you need working capital, but it can take some time—you’ll need to factor in at least a few weeks’ time for application processing.

When Is An SBA 7(a) Loan Better Than An SBA Express Loan?

If you need more than $350,000 to finance real estate or working capital—up to $5 million—you’ll need to consider the more traditional avenue of the SBA 7(a). Because there are more approval requirements for an SBA 7(a) loan, you could also enjoy lower interest rates. What’s more, the SBA guarantees 75% – 85% of a traditional 7(a), while it backs only 50% of an Express Loan.

The good news is that they are both long-term loans, so you’ll have plenty of time to pay down the loan amount. The amount of time you’ll have to repay the debt is the same for both 7(a) and Express loans—25 years to finance real estate and 10 years for other fixed assets and working capital.

The Two Main Types Of SBA Express Loans

Within the SBA Express Loan program, you have two avenues — depending on your type of business. The first option is the standard SBA Express Loan. This loan is nearly identical to the typical SBA 7(a) loan as far as how it’s structured and how you use it. Your lender can structure your financing either as a term loan or as a revolving line of credit, and you can use the small business loan for a number of needs, including:

  • Working Capital
  • Real Estate
  • Equipment
  • Inventory
  • Debt Refinancing
  • Other Business Expenses

However, if you’re a business that deals in exports, there’s a loan structured for you, too: the SBA Export Express Loan option.

What Are SBA Export Express Loans?

The SBA supports American export activity through the SBA Export Loan program. While other SBA loan programs guarantee 50% to 85% of the loan amount, the SBA Export Loan guarantees a whopping 90% of the loan. This means it’s going to be easier for you to obtain the loan.

Additionally, your loan proceeds can be used for a variety of business expenses you incur as an exporter, including financing direct or indirect export activities. The Export Express Loan Program is one of three SBA Export loan options; as the name implies, it is a fast-track loan guarantee program and like the other express loan options, is geared for smaller export-related loan needs.

SBA Express Loan Pros & Cons

As mentioned, the two main differences between SBA Express Loans vs 7(a) options are the amount that can be borrowed and the time it takes to approve the loan. It may be a little easier and a lot faster for you to get the funds you need through an SBA Express Loan, but that convenience doesn’t come without cost. Because the SBA does not back as much of an SBA Express Loan (only 50%, as opposed to the traditional 75% – 85% for a 7(a)), you’re going to see higher rates associated with the higher risk. However, if an Express Loan makes the difference between getting what you need to beat an impending deadline or stalling on the tracks—the extra cost may be worth it in the long run.

Want to find out more about what you can afford when it comes to financing your business expenses? Read “Can I Afford a Small Business Loan” and learn more about how to crunch the numbers while comparing SBA rates to make the best decision for your business.

Qualifying For An SBA Express Loan

The good news is that, as previously mentioned, the requirements for an SBA Express Loan are significantly less stringent than they are for a traditional SBA 7(a) loan, but you’ll still need to provide financial information about yourself and your business, along with some additional forms.

When it comes to qualifying for the SBA Express Loan, the things that are going to ultimately matter the most are your cash flow (or projected cash flow) as well as your prowess in managing your business. Also up for consideration are things like your credit score and how long you’ve been in business. In general, you’ll need a credit score of 680 or higher to qualify for an Express Loan.

As far as the documents you’ll need to fill out in order to qualify for your loan, you’ll work through a checklist of required forms, including a Borrower Information Form, a Statement of Personal History, and an Agreement of Compliance (if more than $10,000 in loan funds are being used for construction). The lender who is ultimately issuing the SBA loan will help you work through the process and point you to the right place to start. They will also be working on their end, checking your credit score and history and verifying information about your business.

Where You Can Find SBA Express Loans

When you are ready to move ahead with the SBA Express Loan option, or you just want to learn more, the SBA provides a lender match service. You’ll start by describing what you need and a little bit about your business. In a few days, you’ll receive an email with information about lenders who are interested in issuing your loan. After that, you can then go through the process of talking to lenders and applying for a loan with the lender that is the best fit.

Of course, you have other options outside of an SBA loan. By doing a little digging, you’ll find the most business-savvy option that meets both your short and long-term business goals.

The post SBA Express Loans: Your Guide To Terms, Fees, and Eligibility appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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Lendio and Merchant Maverick: Making Business Loans Easier

With the advent of online business loans — loans that are fast and easy to obtain online — merchants have more financing options than ever. Before, when business owners needed money, they had to go to a bank or credit union or work with niche funding options like invoice factoring and merchant cash advances. Now, business owners can check their eligibility for a plethora of business financing options from their own computers.

While this is good news for business owners, it presents a new problem: with all the business lenders out there, how do you find the right one for your business? Where do you look for a reputable online lender with decent rates? Merchant Maverick has partnered with Lendio, a business finance company, to answer those questions.

What Is Lendio?

Lendio is an online matchmaking platform that connects merchants to business financers across the nation. Instead of spending time applying for individual loans and comparing offers, merchants who apply for Lendio only have to fill out one 15 minute questionnaire. When you apply, Lendio will shop your business around to its partners and bring you the best offers it received from its network.

With over 75 different partners, Lendio is the largest business finance matchmaking service in America. Their partners offer everything from traditional term loans to more unusual types of financing like merchant cash advances (and everything in between). Below are the types of loans that you might be able to receive through Lendio:

  • Business lines of credit
  • SBA loans
  • Bank loans
  • Short-term loans
  • Medium-term loans
  • Long-term loans
  • Merchant cash advances
  • Business credit cards
  • Equipment financing
  • Commercial mortgages
  • Accounts receivable financing (invoice financing)
  • Startup loans
  • Business acquisition loans

Lendio works with a wide variety of lenders, including well-known brands such as American Express, OnDeck, and Kabbage.

Are You Qualified? Borrower Requirements For Lendio

Anybody can apply for financing through Lendio; however, the company cannot guarantee that you will be matched with any business financers. Currently, about 65% of business owners who apply attain financing through Lendio.

To improve your chances of receiving financing, Lendio recommends that you meet or exceed these business benchmarks:

category minimum requirement

Time in Business

6 months

Business Revenue

$10,000 per month

Personal Credit Score

550

Sound like something you’re interested in? Follow the link below to start an application, or read on to learn more about the application process.

Get Started With Lendio

Step-by-Step Application Process

The Lendio questionnaire can normally be completed in about 15 minutes. After you complete the application, Lendio will shop your request around to its partners and, if they find any matches, will return with quotes within 72 hours. When you have decided on an offer, you may have to complete a full application with the partner before receiving your funds.

The questionnaire contains five steps:

  1. Enter basic info
  2. Enter owner info & make an account
  3. Enter information about your business
  4. Upload documents
  5. Review the application

In all, the application generally takes around 15 minutes to complete. However, because the bulk of the time is dedicated to compiling and uploading various business documents, it may take you more or less than 15 minutes depending on how easily you can access the necessary documents.

The first and longest step is entering basic info. At this stage, you will have to enter general information about your business and the loan you’re looking for. For example, you will have to provide your monthly and annual revenue, your personal income, the industry you are in, and why you want the loan.

The next step is owner info. In this stage, you will have to provide contact info and make an account so you can come back later if you don’t finish.

After owner information, you’ll need to add business info, such as your address and whether or not you are renting.

In the penultimate stage, upload documents, you will have to upload your last three months of bank statements. 

When you have uploaded all the necessary information, the only step left is to review your information and submit the application.

If you run into any problems or have any questions during the application process, support is available via live chat to help you out.

After you submit the questionnaire, Lendio will spend some time gathering offers from their partners before presenting the best ones to your business. If they have found a match, you should receive offers within 72 hours of completing an application. When you have chosen the best offer for you, you might have to supply additional documents, depending on the partner funder. The time from funding to application will vary depending on the partner you are working with. If you’re on a tight schedule, it’s best to inquire how long verification will take before choosing an offer.

Ready to check your eligibility? Click the link below to get started.

Get Started With Lendio

The post Lendio and Merchant Maverick: Making Business Loans Easier appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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How to Analyze Your Credit Card Processing Statement

Here at Merchant Maverick, we’ve received countless questions over the years from concerned business owners regarding their merchant account statements. In fact, our website owes a large part of its very existence to the complex pricing, convoluted statements, and hidden markups that are hallmarks of the card processing industry. This is the unfortunate state of affairs that keeps us researching, writing, and advocating for small business owners.

Questions we frequently field from our readers about their processing bills include:

  • Am I paying too much for card processing? (That’s the big one everyone wants to know!)
  • Why did my processing costs suddenly go up this month?
  • What is this unexpected/oddly-named/junky-looking fee? Is it legit?
  • Is there anything I can do to lower my costs without changing providers?
  • Should I change account providers?

Only a thorough understanding of your own statements will yield the answers to these important questions. The inherent difficulty of the task is that you can’t completely rely on your provider’s statement guide, nor its sales or customer service reps, to explain all the fees. If your account provider is being sneaky about extra markups and unnecessary fees, the responsibility falls directly on you to decipher what’s really going on.

There’s no one-size-fits-all method for analyzing a statement, because every business and situation is a bit different. Still, there are definitely some foundational concepts that should help demystify the process. For example, here’s one quick tip to kick things off: Examine more than one statement side-by-side to avoid missing anything. Often times you need two months of statements just to completely view one month’s worth of charges. So, grab at least two or three consecutive statements and let’s get started!

Detail Vs. Big Picture

Analyzing a processing statement is always a balancing act between the details and the big picture. If you’re worried about a questionable charge, or suspect you’re paying too much overall, you may need to check every fee on your statement to identify its source and confirm the amount is what it should be. I’d encourage all merchants to at least give this a try on a few statements. If anything, you’ll verify that the fee schedule from your merchant agreement was implemented as you expected.

On the flip side, you actually needn’t worry too much about all the individual fees and rates on your statement if you track the big picture numbers (your overall costs) month-over-month. As long as the big picture amounts remain reasonable and consistent, you’re pretty much good to go. If they do change significantly, though, you’re back to looking at the details of your statement to figure out why. Fortunately, if you’ve already mastered the baseline details of your statements, you’ll easily identify the culprits that are most impacting your costs.

In short, understanding the interplay of your big picture numbers (what you’re paying overall) and detailed costs (why you’re paying it) is the best way to protect yourself from paying too much.

With that bit of philosophy out of the way, let’s look at the main big picture percentage that all merchants can calculate.

Effective Rate

Your effective rate is the “all-in” percentage rate you’re paying for the privilege of accepting card payments. All business owners should take a first crack at calculating this rate before conducting any detailed analysis. It’s a simple formula:

(Total monthly fees / Total monthly sales) x 100 = Effective Rate

By total monthly fees, we mean processing charges, gateway fees, statement fees, monthly fees, equipment leases, weird fees you can’t figure out — everything. Sometimes you can grab these numbers from a summary section, as below:

calculating-effective-rate-statement

$5,907.03 / $98,511.45 = 0.0599, or an Effective Rate of 5.99%

I still always recommend calculating your effective rate again once you’ve analyzed your statement in full. That way, you can ensure your summary section didn’t sneakily omit any charges. You’d be surprised how often this happens. (Or, maybe you wouldn’t be!)

Your effective rate provides a basic answer to “How much am I being charged for card processing?” and “Am I paying too much?” The precise answer to that second question is, of course, more nuanced for each business. For a large retail corporation, a 2.5% effective rate might be too high. For a high-risk ecommerce operation with lots of small transactions, 4.5% might be a screaming deal. Even with this variation, however, the effective rate gives you an important birds-eye view of where you stand.

Types Of Fees

You’re probably already aware that there are multiple layers to the card processing industry. Not surprisingly, each entity involved takes a cut of your card sales in one form or another. We’ve covered a lot of this territory in our complete guide to rates and fees, but I’ll quickly recap the main players in the industry, and whether they each charge wholesale costs (fixed throughout the industry) or markups (variable and negotiable depending on your business situation and account provider).

Wholesale

  • Card Networks: We’ve all heard of these folks — Visa, MasterCard, and the like. These associations take their cut of processing costs in the form of card association fees and assessments. If you don’t think you’d be able to recognize these charges on your statement, head over to our card brand fee article for an explanation and full reference list.
  • Card-Issuing Banks: The banks that have issued credit and debit cards to your customers charge interchange fees — the cost of running each individual type of card and transaction. The card associations actually set these fees for the issuing banks, and also publish and frequently update lists for merchant reference.

Not everyone will be able to see pure wholesale costs on their statements. This is because sometimes wholesale costs are passed through directly to merchants, while in other cases they’re blended in with markups. This mostly depends on your pricing model (we’ll have a section on that topic coming up). Still, regardless of what “should” be happening with wholesale charges according to your pricing model, it’s worth checking to see if any have been passed through to you, and if the amounts are correct. Interchange fees are usually pretty easy to spot — they’re typically in a giant itemized list if you can see them at all. Card brand fees can be more difficult to identify, so definitely consult a reliable reference list.

Markup

Everything besides those two types of wholesale fees we’ve just discussed counts as a markup. Here are the main players that add costs above wholesale:

  • Processor/Acquirer: You may know some of the big ones — First Data, TSYS, Vantiv/Worldpay, Chase, Elavon, etc. These entities are also usually involved with an acquiring bank (e.g., Wells Fargo or B of A) if they aren’t already one themselves. The processor behind your merchant account can add its own extra fees and markups.
  • Merchant Service Provider (MSP): This is the entity that actually sets up and manages your merchant account — the company you interface with most directly. You also access your monthly statements through your MSP, even though the statement might have the big processor’s name across the top. You may have signed up for your account with the MSP department of one of the large processors we’ve already mentioned, or you may have used a separate MSP/ISO that has teamed up with one or more processors to provide accounts. Regardless of the setup, your merchant services provider adds its own markups as well.
  • Additional Service Providers: Charges from other third parties (such as gateway or equipment providers) may also show up on your merchant account statement.

A word of caution about “pass-through” fees: Just because your MSP claims to be merely “passing through” a fee to you “at cost,” doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a wholesale charge (from the card associations or card-issuing banks). As you can see above, the big processor/acquirer behind the scenes may also charge its own fees and markups, and often other third-party equipment and software providers do as well. These “pass-through” fees should be counted as variable markups, even though your MSP may not see any money from the charges.

Effective Markup

If you can see all interchange fees and card brand fees (wholesale costs) itemized on your statement, you can calculate your effective markup. Let’s take a look at what this is, and why it’s an advantageous number to crunch if you can swing it.

Remember, the markup is the piece that varies between MSPs. Not only can the overall amount vary widely, but the way markups are charged is also variable between providers. For example, one MSPs might charge a low markup percentage on your individual transactions, but several different monthly fees as well. Meanwhile, another MSP might charge a high markup percentage on transactions, but hardly any monthly fees. Which one’s a better deal? This is why it’s good to know your markup as an overall percentage.

You’re effective markup not only lets you know how much you’re really paying in controllable costs each month, but it’s also a handy figure to have if you’d like to compare your statement with other merchant account offers.

Here’s the basic formula (always multiply by 100 to convert to a percentage):

Markup Fees  / Total Sales = Effective Markup

Depending on how your statement is laid out, here’s another way to think of the calculation that might be more helpful:

[Total Fees – (Interchange Fees + Card Brand Fees)] / Total Sales = Effective Markup

I like this second way because it’s a clear process of elimination. Once you’ve got all the wholesale fees accounted for and subtracted away from your total fees, you automatically know everything else you’re charged is a markup.

You might have a summary section on your statement that divides up your fees in such a way to make this calculation simple. It’s more likely, however, that you’ll have to pick through your statement to make sure you understand your pricing structure and the true classification of each fee before you can add up the numbers and perform the effective markup calculation with confidence. Call me paranoid, but I have a mistrust of so-called “summary” sections on statements. Been burned way too many times!

What if you can’t calculate your effective markup at all, because your statement doesn’t make it possible to see all wholesale fees separately? That’s fine — just focus on tracking your effective rate for now. It’s not as telling a number as your effective markup, but it’s an excellent starting point for staying on top of your costs.

Pricing Model

Knowing your pricing model is absolutely critical to understanding your statement, so if you don’t already know it, now is the time to figure it out! We have an article that walks you through the process of identifying your pricing model by looking for specific, telltale signs on your statement, as well as in-depth articles on each of the four main models most MSPs offer.

We’ve already alluded to the fact that your pricing model determines whether or not you can distinguish wholesale costs from markups. You’ll never know exactly where you could be saving money (or where you’re getting ripped off) if you can’t make this distinction.

This is a complicated topic, so it may take you a while to wrap your mind around which model you have and how it impacts your statement. That’s okay — take your time. We do also occasionally come across some interesting hybrid models, so if you still need assistance figuring out your model, feel free to reach out to us.

So, how do the pricing models work? Well, the models were developed based specifically on interchange fees and whether or not they are blended in with MSP rate markups. (Card brand fees are not tied as tightly to your pricing model, so I’d just recommend checking your own statement to see if any are passed through.) Below are links to articles on each of the models, as well as a super-brief overview of each.

Interchange separate from markup:

  • Interchange-Plus (Cost-Plus) Pricing: Interchange rates are itemized and passed through separately from the MSP markups. Rate markups typically include a percentage markup and a per-transaction fee markup.
  • Membership (Subscription) Pricing: A version of interchange-plus pricing in which a monthly membership fee is charged as a markup in lieu of a percentage markup over rates.

Interchange blended with markup:

  • Tiered Pricing: Interchange rates are blended in with markups to create multiple rate tiers.
  • Flat-Rate Pricing: Interchange rates are blended in with markups to create a flat processing rate (most often used by merchant aggregators like Square, Stripe, and PayPal — not traditional MPSs).

In theory, you should be able to calculate your effective markup if you have one of the first two models, because wholesale fees are kept separate. This is one reason we favor MSPs that offer transparent interchange-plus or subscription models to all merchants. For the other two blended plans, you’ll need to stick to monitoring your effective rate only.

Billing Cycle

Beyond understanding your pricing model, you should be aware of exactly when you’re charged the various fees and rates due on your account. A closer look at your billing cycle could potentially reveal that you’re not calculating your effective rate properly, or that you’re paying higher processing rates than you originally thought. Here are a couple of tricky billing methods to watch out for:

Daily Discount (Vs. Monthly Discount)

“Discount” here refers to your card processing fees (as opposed to scheduled monthly fees). Your discount method is totally irrespective of your pricing model. Most merchants are on a monthly discount plan, meaning their discount fees are all charged in one lump sum at the same time as the rest of their scheduled monthly fees. In other words, you receive gross deposits from your batch settlements throughout the month, and then pay all your discount fees along with all other scheduled fees all at once.

On a daily discount cycle, your discount fees (or a portion of them) are deducted from each batch settlement as the month progresses. This leaves you with net deposits from your batches, and all your other scheduled fees are charged in a separate chunk. You can often tell if you are on a daily discount cycle if your statement contains terms like “less discount paid,” or shows net versus gross amounts in sales columns. With daily discount, you must be careful to add the discount fees you’ve already paid throughout the month to the other monthly fees you still need to pay. Don’t be mislead by the “total charges” figure, which may not include the discount fees you’re already paid.

Add together the “less discount paid” of $168.03 and “total card fees” of $50.95 to find the actual amount that is paid for the month: $218.98!

Billback

This is a rolling billing method that is technically different from (but often combined with) both a daily discount setup and a tiered pricing model. On a normal tiered plan, you’re charged the different rate tiers (qualified, mid-qualified, non-qualified) for your transactions all in the same month. With billback, however, you are charged the qualified (lowest possible) rate for all your transactions first, but then charged a fee the next month to recoup all the extra cost for any higher-tiered transactions you ran.

With this rolling system, you actually need two months of statements to even calculate your effective rate for a given month, since your charges for one month are split over two months — possibly more. Even worse, the Enhanced Billback method (a.k.a. Enhanced Recovery Reduced) adds an additional markup to the next month’s recouping fee. You may see BB, EBB or ERR abbreviations (along with a past month’s abbreviation) listed on your statements if you’re in a billback situation, but you may just need to spot the extra fees on your own.

enhanced billing merchant services

Billback statement: Extra fees for April transactions charged in May.

Nitty-Gritty Numbers

As we discussed at the beginning of the guide, you needn’t identify every fee every month into eternity, but I’d strongly recommend going for it on a few statements. Maybe you’re just curious and would like to become a more cost-savvy merchant, or maybe you suspect a hidden fee, or maybe your processing bill has spiked lately and you want to know why. Not to mention, sometimes statements contain run-of-the-mill mistakes that need catching! After all, not all MSPs are pure evil. Just most of them.

Of course, I can’t tell you every fee you’ll ever see on a statement and whether it’s legit. What I can do is offer you a few general tips I’ve found helpful as I’ve analyzed statements:

  • Identify Percentages vs. Dollar Amounts: Costs may come through as percentages of sales volume, per-transaction fees, or flat fees. At times, half the battle is just confirming which fees are percentages and which are dollar amounts, because they may all be shown in decimal form (and all mixed into the same columns!). The good news is that a quick calculation of your own can usually confirm which are which.
  • Use Fee Guides: Absolutely make use of any statement guide from your provider, but also check out an outside resource or two. Our fee guide lists the common fees you’ll encounter on a statement, and our fee infographic shows the typical cost range of many standard charges. I know I’ve said this a bunch of times already, but you’ll also need a good card brand fee reference list to confirm these fixed-yet-esoteric charges.
  • Ask Yourself Fee ID Questions: As you work through each charge, see if you can answer the following queries:
    • Who charges this fee/rate? (see “Types Of Fees” section above for possible culprits)
    • Is this charge a markup, wholesale cost, or a blend of the two?
    • Is this wholesale charge correct according to interchange tables or the card brand fee list?
    • Is this markup (or blended cost) correct according to my merchant fee schedule from my MSP?
  • Don’t Trust The Layout: We’ve dissected some horrifically disorganized statements over the years, which has only confirmed in my mind that you simply cannot rely on the sub-headings on a processing statement to properly categorize your fees. Wholesale fees are very often interspersed with markups and vice versa, so be on your guard. I’m particularly vigilant about “authorization” sections —  the perfect hiding spot for extra per-transaction fees.
  • Don’t Trust Fee Names: This last tip sounds strange at first, but hear me out. Names and abbreviations for fees have little standardization across the industry — even wholesale fees that are supposed to be the same for everyone! This makes it all the more difficult to identify extra or padded fees on a statement. If you’re trying to pin down a particular charge, it’s often best to consider the amount first while taking the fee’s name with a grain of salt. Here’s one good rule of thumb: Just because a charge has a card brand abbreviation in front of it doesn’t guarantee it’s all from the card brand!

Poor layout example: An MSP markup fee buried in the middle of a giant alphabetical list of wholesale card brand fees. And, the section name is just “Other Fees.” Not cool! (Note: this is an old statement with non-current card brand fee amounts)

Fine-Tuning Fees

We’re about take this detailed numbers analysis thing to the next level. Ready?

So, remember how we said that wholesale fees are fixed, non-negotiable and completely out of your control, and that markups from your MSP are the variable, negotiable costs of processing? Well, in reality, this is a slight oversimplification of the system. There are some nuances and gray areas that once recognized on your statement can help you catch problems, and potentially even adjust your processing habits to save money.

  • Avoidable Penalty Fees: Most card brand fees are simple, blanket assessments on your transactions, but others are in place specifically to punish you for not following the proper protocols for authorization and settlement. They’re small fees, but can add up fast if they’re applied to a large portion of your transactions. If you’re seeing a lot of transaction “integrity” type fees, you should take the initiative to find out why this is happening. (While we’re on the topic, don’t forget that MSPs can also charge avoidable penalty fees — a PCI-non compliance fee is one common example.)
  • Optimizing Interchange Rates: While interchange rates themselves are fixed and pre-established across the processing industry, you may have more control over which categories of interchange your transactions fall into than you think. The process of ensuring you get the best interchange rates possible is called interchange optimization. B2B transactions using commercial cards can be processed with additional Level 2 and Level 3 data to get the optimal interchange rate, for example. Transactions can also end up “downgraded” to higher-cost interchange categories if you do not authorize and settle them properly (in this way, downgrades are basically another type of penalty fee). Interchange downgrades happen more commonly to card-not-present businesses because there is more margin for data-entry error and omission than when cards are read directly by processing equipment. Common statement codes for downgraded interchange rates include EIRF (electronic interchange reimbursement fee) and STD (standard). It’s normal for a few transactions to be downgraded, but if you’re seeing interchange downgrades on the majority of your transactions, this is a definite red flag.

This merchant’s largest Visa Card Brand fee for the month was $25.30 for 253 transactions that didn’t follow proper authorization/settlement procedures. It’s likely these transactions are getting downgraded to higher-cost interchange categories as well. The merchant should look into adjusting its processing procedures to avoid these unnecessary costs.

Pulling It All Together

After you’ve worked through the details of your 2-3 consecutive statements, it’s worth repeating your effective rate calculation on each one, just to ensure you didn’t miss any charges. You may have also spotted an extra or padded fee here and there that you’re ready to confidently take up with your MSP. You should also be able to locate any anomalies that occurred during a given month (e.g., excessive penalty fees, chargebacks, one-time incidental fees, etc.) that may have impacted your effective rate.

If your statements itemize interchange rates and card brand fees separately from markups (interchange-plus or subscription models only), you’re finally ready to do that magical effective markup calculation accurately. Remember to only count interchange fees and card brand fees as true wholesale. Everything else is technically a markup!

Final Thoughts

We’ve covered a lot of ground in this guide, but hopefully you’re ready to tackle some big picture calculations (like your effective rate), as well as better identify any specific “what the heck is that?” charges from your statement. If you’re ready to become the consummate master of your processing statements from here on out, the first step will be to get on a cost-plus pricing model (interchange-plus or subscription/membership). This is the only way you’ll see what you’re paying each month above wholesale processing costs that are largely out of your control. All but very small merchants will benefit from one of these pricing models from a trustworthy MSP. If you’re not on a cost-plus plan already, make it a priority if you change providers.

Meanwhile, keep on tracking that effective rate (and effective markup if your statement allows) month-over-month for the lifetime of your merchant account. Once you’ve got a handle on your statement, it will be totally worth the 12 seconds the calculation will take you each month. I’m a super detailed-oriented person as a matter of principle, and even I give you my blessing to pretty much ignore all the stupid little fees and markups your processor or MSP may charge, as long as you’re satisfied your big picture numbers are remaining sensible and consistent. Just know I’ll send you right back into the details if those effective numbers go up!

Still need help with pricing or statements? Check out the transparent pricing of our highest-rated merchant account providers, or try these additional resources:

  • Never Overpay for Credit Card Processing Again
  • How Much Should You Pay for Credit Card Processing?
  • How to Negotiate the Perfect Credit Card Processing Deal

The post How to Analyze Your Credit Card Processing Statement appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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How To Advertise on Groupon Effectively

How To Advertise on Groupon

The odds are that if you’ve been scouring the web for a deal, you’ve come across Groupon. In recent years, Groupon has become a touchstone for people who are looking for great deals on quality services, products, and more. And advertising your business on Groupon can put you in the millions of people who use the platform each day.

I believe that Groupon is one of the least utilized advertising platforms around. Using this e-commerce platform means that you won’t have to compete as much with competitors for advertising real estate. Utilizing the platform efficient can help attract repeat customers, increase brand recognition, and make more profit along the way.

So, save some paper and embrace the era of digital couponing we’re all living through right now. Here’s how you can advertise your business or brand on Groupon.

between 18- and 44-years-old. Men and women appear to use the platform in similar numbers, meaning that businesses can expect advertisement and deals that are inclusive to all genders to do best.

Using Groupon couldn’t be easier: both merchants and customers create profiles geared toward their interests or businesses and can choose to shop or advertise throughout the e-commerce platform. The ease of use and access to Groupon has only helped the commerce company not only grow in popularity but made it a viable place for other business to market their products, services, etc..

By leveraging Groupon’s broad demographic appeal, you can establish a strong presence on the platform that directly affects your bottom lines.

www.groupon.com/login, a login page will pop up that will request the following criteria:

  • Your legal first and last name
  • Your business or personal email address
  • Your desired Password
  • Choose whether or not you want to receive email newsletters from Groupon
  • Choose whether or not you want the device you’re on to remember your inputs

After signing up, you’ll have the ability to do deep dives in local, national, or international markets. It’s worth noting that more than 70 percent of all Groupon sales remain bought by locals seeking deals on products and services in their neighborhoods.

Groupon Merchant Blog, which we’ll get into later, has many accounts of restaurants experiencing more traffic from using Groupon. From offering one-time deals on certain dishes to revolving discounted specials, Groupon can help grow your business traffic.

One of the more exciting perks of your restaurant being a Groupon Merchant is that you can offer Loyalty Rewards programs. Much like in other iterations, these loyalty programs can help attract long-time customers and bring attention to your eatery.

There needs to be a reason for your customers to want a loyalty program through Groupon. Consider offering deals and incentives to customers to sign up for loyalty rewards to receive. Recently, The National Restaurant News found that people who have a Loyalty Program to a specific restaurant will spend almost 40 percent more (on average) when they’re closer to receiving an award.

Even if you don’t choose to start a Loyalty Program for your restaurant, you can continue to offer deals. Research shows that people are many times more likely to spend more on a more expensive meal if they believe they’re getting it cheaper than usual.

Advertising on Groupon for your restaurant is a win-win: Your bottom lines and customer traffic grow, and your eaters leave having saved on a good meal.

How to Advertise on Groupon for Health and Beauty

Nail and hair salons, spas, massage companies, and more health and beauty businesses can all benefit by leveraging Groupon to expand their outreach. Research shows that even during times of recession, Americans tend to continue to spend the same on health and beauty products and services. But Groupon can do more than help you get more clients.

Groupon allows Groupon Merchants to streamline appointments by simplifying the booking process. Using “Groupon Appointments,” you can allow customers to request appointments after they purchase a ticket, voucher, or digital reservation card for your business. Your “Groupon Calendar” will immediately be updated to accommodate the customer, and that specific time will be unable to be booked that day. This streamlined process also eliminates the risk of double booking from happening.

Also, you can help boost traffic for our other online health and beauty services by cross-linking to your “Groupon Page.” You’ll have the option to link to your main business website through both your Groupon Page and advertisement, itself. By creating easy access to your main website, you can introduce new and old customers to services that are available, but not through Groupon.

How To Advertise on Groupon Effectively appeared first on ShivarWeb.

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How To Advertise on Snapchat Effectively

How to Advertise on Snapchat Effectively

The digital marketing landscape is evolving quicker than ever before. While print and more traditional mediums still have their place, those who want to take their platforms need to the next level need to embrace the new digital landscape. And no platforms are more influential to your business than the social media, including Snapchat.

Facebook, Linkedin, and Twitter are common social media vehicles to advertise. However, because Snapchat is so new, many businesses don’t know how to or don’t want to, leverage the platform to their advantage. And I think that’s a great mistake on their end.

By explicitly targeting specific demographics and meaningfully engaging with them, Snapchat offers a variety of tangible benefits to growing your business.

Scroll through to learn more about Snapchat itself and how to advertise on Snapchat, one of the most popular social media networks in the world.

Snapchat is now part of the larger Snap Inc.. In addition to their primary product, Snapchat, Snap Inc. will expand its influence in the social media space. Their flagship product, Spectacles, a pair of “smart glasses” that syncs with the user’s Snapchat account and records videos as they go about their business.

One of the core principles of Snapchat is that media recorded, the pictures and messages, are just available temporarily before they need user input. Snapchat was once only meant for peer-to-peer photo sharing through such platforms as “Stories,” but has now introduced “Discover.” The latterly mentioned platform allows brands and media outlets to run ad-supported content through short-form entertainment.

As of this February, Snapchat has around 190 million daily active users who use the platform. Snap Inc., which continues to own and operate Snapchat and is now a public company, is worth an estimated $20 billion. And there’s a good chance the company could exceed $30 billion in worth by 2020.

profitable space to advertise businesses on to see tangible results.

Since going public, Snap Inc. is keen on growing their demographic appeal. This recent choice to go public is promising to those who want to advertise on the platform. It also means those companies can broaden the product and services they push on Snapchat.

“They are eventually going to tap out of these younger age groups and will have to court older demographic groups,” said eMarketer principal analyst Catherine Boyle to Forbes in response to Snapchat’s demographic appeal. “They may not need Facebook-level penetration across every age group, but growth will happen among an older user base.”

Snapchat also is widely aware that their interface isn’t the easiest to use for those who are new to social media.

“The onboarding experience is difficult,” chief strategist of Kuuhubb Tero Kuittinen said of Snapchat’s account sign up to Forbes. “It’s not easy to learn how to use it. If you’re 18, it’s not a big stretch, but if you’re 45, it’s tough to figure out.”

Snapchat is already making stride to making the platform more comfortable to use to those who aren’t social media savvy. And when these older demographics do eventually become more prominent on the platform, Snapchat will gain more traction as a place to not only get news but see new products and consume media.

“Older groups are now more likely to tune in [to Snapchat] for content,” eMarketer analyst Jamie Chung said in an email to Forbes. “The platform has multiple partnerships with television networks for mini-episodes. Meanwhile, the younger groups are less likely to add Snapchat when Instagram Stories can fulfill their broadcasting needs.”

By leveraging Snapchat now, you can get ahead of the crowd and establish a strong presence on the platform.

within the first 15 second of seeing it. Those brands who can capitalize on early engagement will be far more successful than those who need “build up.”

Long-form Video Ads also lend themselves to a higher amount of creativity than most of the platform’s other ad services. Because creators have such a long time to craft an image, a business can introduce storytelling aspects into these ads. Research has shown that brands who can create themes and stories within their ethos have greater longevity and increased product sales.

In the end, Long Form Video ads aren’t for business who aren’t media-focused. But for those who are, there’s no better ad service on Snapchat to convey a story, theme, or concept than by running a well-made Long Form Video ad.

News’ on Snapchat’s main website to do just that.

The blog also regularly highlights general market trends, news, and practices that Snapchat business are using to help grown their efforts.

Snapchat is continuing to grow quarter after quarter. It’s presence and importance is only increasing as it stocks share.

I recommend using Snapchat as a vehicle to tell stories through ads. Unlike its contemporaries like Facebook and Twitter, Snapchat lets you engage with your audience in profound, meaningful ways. You can share your brand with narratives and creative designs, rather than just with clickbait copy.

In the coming years, storytelling will become one of the most potent marketing tools. Snapchat and it’s creative ads do just that: tell stories in pleasing ways that can draw an audience from near and far to your business, brand, etc.. Snap away, tell stories, and reap the benefits from being an engaged, creative “Snapchatter.”

 

 

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How To Advertise On Pinterest Effectively

How to Advertise on Pinterest Effectively

Pinterest was launched in 2010 and has grown to at least 200 monthly active users in 2017. The social sharing platform is designed to help people discover information on the internet. Therefore, just creating an account on Pinterest can draw viewers to your brand.

Pinning content from your own website puts it in front of a new audience. Even pinning other people’s content can draw followers to your Pinterest account. You can get more data from your account. Optimizing the SEO of your Pinterest boards can boost their organic search rankings in Google. All of these strategies are free.

The platform began experimenting with monetizing certain pins in 2014, initiating an effective way for companies to advertise. Nowadays, advertisers can create Promoted Pins, which show up alongside all of the other pins on the page. In this image, you can see that the pin that says “Get 500% more traffic” indicates that it’s promoted by Pinterest in the description below it:

In this case, Pinterest is using its platform to advertise tips for businesses. It’s always encouraging to see a company using its own advertising services. That’s one way to know that the system works.

What Is Pinterest?

First, let’s discuss Pinterest and how it works. Some people say that Pinterest is a social network. Others refer to it as a search engine. Through Pinterest, you create a profile and then “pin” visual content onto different “boards.”

It’s like a collection of virtual bulletin boards. Instead of cutting out paper images from magazines, though, you save images that you find on the internet. You can write a description or include a link with those images so that you can refer back to the website from which they came.

You can create several boards and label them however you’d like. Most people set up boards for different categories. For example, you might have boards that are labeled:

  • Home décor
  • Fun summer activities
  • Dessert recipes
  • Knitting and crochet
  • Boho style

If you’re looking for inspiration for a project, a shopping venture or content that falls in line with your interests, you can search for it on Pinterest. Your search results appear as visual pins with short descriptions underneath them. This is what came up when we searched for “watercolor tutorials”:

To find out more about each search result, you can click on it. From here, you can see the full description, the URL from which the image came, when it was published and any comments that other users have left.

Here’s where things get social. You can leave a comment or ask a question. You can also follow the original poster’s account. Therefore, simply pinning items that interest you can drive traffic back to your Pinterest page and potentially to your website.

Emarketer says that there are 2 billion monthly searches on Pinterest. The platform drives about 5 percent of referral traffic to websites.

When you log onto Pinterest, you’ll see your feed, which shows the pins that the platform thinks that you’ll be interested in. You might see pins from people you follow or a combination of content that you might care about, based on other items that you’ve pinned.

However, Pinterest prefers to show content from trusted sources in users’ feeds. Therefore, if you’re using Pinterest for your business without advertising, you need to make sure that you pin high-quality content and that your pins are receiving engagement in the form of click-throughs, saves and comments.

Why Pinterest Advertising Works

While Facebook is the largest social media platform, Pinterest is competitive with Instagram, LinkedIn, Reddit, and Twitter, according to Pew Research. Twenty-six percent of all American adults use Pinterest, and most of them are women. Pinterest reports that 40 percent of people who actively pin have a household income of at least $100K. If you sell products targeted toward women who want to shop, you’re in the right place.

Here are some other statistics about Pinterest users and their purchasing power:

  • Millenials use Pinterest as much as Instagram.
  • People who use Pinterest are ready to make a purchase.
  • 93% of active pinners use the platform to plan future purchases.
  • 73% of pinners say that brand content makes the platform more useful.
  • 61% of pinners have bought something after viewing a promoted pin.
  • 75% of saved pins are initiated by businesses.
  • People who use Pinterest spend 29% more on retail than non-users.

People search the platform for information that they can use to fuel upcoming purchases for things like home renovations, weddings, parties, vacations or having a baby. This is the place where people are looking for new information, ideas and brands. If you can provide these new ideas, you can make connections with a new audience.

Pinterest advertising looks natural. It fits into place with the other pins in your feed, and it doesn’t detract from or interrupt the user experience. Promoting your pins puts you in front of a receptive audience who is looking for products and ideas that will help them make their next move.

Types Of Pinterest Advertising

There are several types of Pinterest ads, including:

  • Promoted pins
  • Promoted video pins
  • One-tap pins
  • Promoted app pins
  • Cinematic pins

Promoted pins look just like a regular pin, except that they have the word “Promoted” at the bottom of the pin. Businesses pay Pinterest to give these priority over non-promoted pins. Once someone saves your promoted pin, it’s considered an organic find, and that person will no longer see the word “Promoted.” Other people who follow these pinners may find and save these pins, bringing you added traffic for free.

If your promoted pin contains a video, it will appear in search results, news feeds and a “More Like This” section that comes up below a clicked pin and shows similar content. The video will play automatically.

One-tap pins bypass the close-up image and “more details” page that normally shows up when you click on a pin in your feed. When a user clicks on these ads, they go straight to a landing page that you designate. You might think that this is a great way to get your audience in your lap, but some users are surprised by the change in the normal process and click off of your website quickly to get back to Pinterest.

If you are promoting an app, you can use a promoted app ad to get people to install it. The ad will include an app icon and install button so that users don’t have to leave Pinterest to sign up for your app.

Cinematic pins contain animation that moves when a user scrolls. This captures users’ attention and makes them feel like they’re in control without missing the end of the video.

5 Things To Do Before Advertising On Pinterest

Paying to promote pins can be an effective marketing strategy. However, there are a few steps that you should take before you set up your first advertisement on Pinterest.

1. Register For A Business Account

If you haven’t used Pinterest before, you’ll need to create a new account. It’s free to set up, and it takes less than a minute. Start by going to Pinterest’s Business Account page and clicking “Sign Up.”

Enter your email address, password and business name, select your business category from the drop-down menu and click “Create account.”

Follow the next steps, which are self-explanatory. These include selecting your language and country, adding your website URL and picking at least five categories in which you’re interested.

If you already have a Pinterest account, log in and click on Settings. It will say “Business Account Basics” on the top left if it’s a business account. If it’s a personal account, you can convert it to a business account by going to this link.

2. Claim Your Website

When you set up your business account, you should have added your business website URL to your profile. If you didn’t do that yet, go to your settings by clicking on the profile image on the top right when you’re logged into your account. Scroll down until you see the “Claim Website” section.

After you claim your website, you can utilize features such as:

  • Website analytics – Track traffic to pins from your site.
  • Featured logo – Add your profile picture to any content that’s pinned from your site.
  • Early access to tools – Be the first to hear about new business tools that Pinterest rolls out.

To claim your website, you’ll need to either add a bit of code to the <head> section of your website’s index.html file or download a file from Pinterest and upload it to your site’s root directory. After you do that, you can submit your website to Pinterest for review.

3. Install A Conversion Tag

You can add another Pinterest code to every page that you want to track on your website. The code is the same for every page, but you can use it to retarget people who have visited specific pages on your website.

To do this, click on “Ads” on the top left of your account, and then select “Conversion Tracking.”

Choose “Generate Pinterest Tag.” You’ll get code that you can insert between the <head> and </head> elements in the HTML of every page on your website for which you want to track visitors.

4. Upload Your List

If you have amassed a list for your newsletter, you can upload it to Pinterest so that you can target the same users with your Pinterest ads**. Just create a .csv file with the email addresses that you’ve collected over the years. Log into your Pinterest account.

**If you go this route – you need to have your audience’s consent. If you are in the EU, because it’s the law. If you are outside the EU, because you need to be cool, not creepy.

Click on Ads > Audiences.

Then, click on “Create Audience.” Choose “A list of customers that you upload” from the window that appears. Name your audience, and include the date so that you can update it a few months from now.

Pinterest will match up the email addresses from your list with those of its users so that you can show ads to the same people. In the future, you can also create “an actalike audience that behaves similarly to the one you already have.” This will choose people with similar demographics and interests as the people on your email list.

5. Pin Some Content

You can’t promote a pin unless you’ve pinned it publicly. Therefore, if you have created a new Pinterest account in hopes of setting up some ads, you should take some time to create boards and pin content for free before you put money into it.

Make sure that all of your pins contain high-quality images. The visuals are going to grab people’s attention before anything else. Therefore, they need to be top-notch.

Vertical Pins

Pinterest displays images vertically. Therefore, you need to use the correct aspect ratio to get the most out of your pins’ appearance. For years, Pinterest has claimed that a 2:3 aspect ratio is ideal. However, some pinners said that posts with these dimensions didn’t perform well. Some people even created extra-long posts to capture people’s attention.

As of June 2018, however, Pinterest said that those “giraffe pins” may be cropped and won’t show up as frequently in people’s feeds. The ideal aspect ratio is 600 pixels wide by 900 pixels high (720 x 1080 works well too). Square images look good, and they are easy to import from Instagram.

An aspect ratio of 600 x 1260 (with 1260 being the height in pixels) won’t be cropped. Anything taller will.

If you’re creating long giraffe pins, make sure that they add value. Infographics and step-by-step tutorials are ideal for these space-hogging pins.

Rich Pins

Creating Rich Pins can help people learn more about your products. Rich pins contain additional information, including:

  • App – Takes viewers to the app store for download
  • Article – Includes a headline, author and story description
  • Product – Includes pricing, availability and purchase location
  • Recipe – Includes title, ingredients, cooking times, serving information and ratings

By adding the metadata directly to the pin, brands can increase engagement. Picture a recipe that contains a gorgeous picture of the food that you’re eating with the recipe itself below it. The pins pull from the metadata on your website.

Creating Rich Pins is a two-step process. First, you must add metadata to the articles, products and recipes on your site. If you have a WordPress site, you can do this easily with a plugin like Yoast. Then, you need to verify your Rich Pins with Pinterest. Once you validate one URL with a Rich Pin on your site, you’re all set. You don’t need to validate all of the URLs with Rich Pins.

Buyable Pins

Pinterest rolled out Buyable Pins in 2015 to make it easier for its audience to shop directly from a pin. These pins list the price in blue and contain a Buy It button so that people can make a purchase right from the app. When someone clicks Buy It, they go directly to the checkout, where they can pay with a credit card or Apple Pay.

If you’re a retailer or sell your own products, you’ll need to have a Shopify store that’s linked with the Pinterest sales channel to take advantage of Buyable Pins. As long as you point a pin’s URL to the product detail page on your Shopify store, it will activate as shoppable.

Pinterest automatically matches your product feed with your pins and generates Buyable Pins for any products that you have already pinned. For any other product, you should create pins from scratch. These can include additional images so that more people can discover your products.

Buyable Pins are similar to Rich Pins in that they display additional information. Rich Pins, however, don’t send you to the checkout when you click on them.

How To Set Up A Pinterest Ad

If you’ve decided to spend money on advertising, you might wonder how to advertise on Pinterest. This is a step-by-step tutorial that teaches you how to do it.

1. Create The Ad

When you’re ready to start advertising, click on the + sign that appears toward the top right, and then select “Create Ad.”

This brings you to your Ads Manager, where you can create your campaign.

2. Set Your Goals

You’ll begin by selecting your campaign objective.

Then, you’ll enter your campaign details. You’ll have to come up with a name for your campaign if it’s new, or you can select an existing campaign from the drop-down menu. You’ll also designate your daily and lifetime budget for the campaign here.

Then, decide on your campaign placement, which includes whether you want to make your ads one-tap. This feature can’t be edited once your campaign starts running.

If you’re creating an app install ad, you will have the option to select whether to optimize the campaign for completed installs or visits to the app download page. Both are charged on a cost-per-click basis. Pinterest also has direct integrations with mobile measurement partners, or MMPs, which help you track the install performance.

Finally, click “Create campaign and continue.”

3. Set Up An Ad Group

An ad group is a set of promoted pins that fall under the same campaign. You can have multiple ad groups for one campaign, which means that you will have a separate budget for your ad groups than you do for the campaign as a whole.

Understanding Ad Groups

Each ad group can have multiple promoted pins within it. You can assign different budgets and targets to each ad group, though. Therefore, you can use ad groups to set up unique budgets for different marketing areas, such as regions, demographics or products. You can also use ad groups to test the design, placement and objectives of your advertisements without building separate campaigns.

For example, you could create separate ad groups with maximum daily budgets to target:

  • Your email list
  • People who have visited related pages on your website
  • Actalike audiences

To keep everything straight, you should name your ad group based on its organizational structure, such as who you’re targeting or what promoted pins are showing up within that group.

4. Create A Target Audience

On the ad group page, you’ll be asked to create a target audience. This helps you get your ads in front of the right people. You can target viewers based on the following criteria:

You’ll need to give this audience a name and description. If you choose to retarget people who have visited your website, you’ll have to create a Pinterest tag to track them. If you choose to target individuals from an email list, you’ll be asked to upload the list.

You’ll be able to further clarify your audience by interests, such as boards and pins that they’ve interacted with in the past, keywords, languages, locations, devices and genders.

5. Create Your Maximum CPC Bid

On the page where you create your ad group, you’ll be asked to set a maximum CPC bid. This is the maximum amount that you want to pay per audience action, whether that’s impressions, clicks, engagement or app download. You won’t be charged the full bid unless it’s necessary to beat out the next-highest bidder.

6. Select Your Promoted Pin

Now, you can select the pin that you want to promote. You can only choose from items that you’ve publicly pinned. The pin doesn’t have to be one that you have initiated through your own website, although it would probably be a good idea to use an image that you’ve created.

Next, you’ll give the promoted pin a name (optional) and set the URL of the landing page that you want visitors to end up on when they click on it.

Consider the URL carefully. Ideally, you’ll send people who click on your ad to a page dedicated to your Pinterest audience. The landing page should have something to do with the pin that led people to it. If you’ve added Pinterest tag code to your website, you’ll be able to track the success of each promoted pin.

Click “Promote Pin” when you’re finished. The ad will go to Pinterest for review, which can take 24 hours. At this time, add your billing details so that you can pay for your ad once it’s approved.

The Quick Way To Promote A Pin

Pinterest also provides a way to promote your pins in about 10 seconds. Go to your profile and hover over a pin that you want to advertise. Click on the Promote button.

A window will open up where you can add all of the promotional details, including the URL, daily budget, campaign duration, target audience and keywords.

Tips And Tricks For Optimizing Your Pinterest Advertising

Just putting yourself out there isn’t always enough to gain an audience. Instead of wasting your dollars by advertising blindly, follow this advice to get the most out of your budget.

Promote The Best Pins

You might wonder what pins to promote when you advertise on Pinterest. Those with strong visuals do best. Making multiple pins for the same product is a good idea. You can show different angles, styles and descriptions to pull in different customers. Adding your brand name or logo to the image improves credibility.

If you sell products, Pinterest says that photographing them in lifestyle shots is more effective than displaying the product on its own. For example, a fashion pin should show someone wearing the clothing in a real-world setting. Home décor pins do better when they concentrate on the product instead of people. Hair and beauty products get great engagement when the items are displayed against a plain, contrasting background.

Most experts recommend promoting pins that are already doing well. Even though you might figure that boosting a low-performing pin could help it get in front of your audience, promoting a high-performing pin is more likely to give you results. Wouldn’t you want to pay for results as opposed to a lackluster reception to your ad?

When you’re picking a pin in step 3 of the ad creation process, you have the option of choosing from all pins, 30-day most clicked pins or 30-day most saved pins. Use this to your advantage to promote your most engaging content.

Add Text To Your Pins

Even though Pinterest relies on photos, it doesn’t hurt to add a little text to your images. The text overlay should clarify what viewers are looking at without detracting from the design as a whole. The words shouldn’t detract from the aesthetic. A simple overlay works wonderfully.

Make sure that you’re using the description wisely too. A call-to-action helps users stay engaged. You can ask people a question or give an instruction, such as “Learn more” or “Buy now.” You might even try having your call-to-action say, “Pin this for later” to remove the urgent sales quality but encourage people to save your pin.

Consistently Monitor And Analyze Your Ads

It’s hard to predict what’s going to resonate with viewers. Pinterest is a visual platform, and some images may capture more attention than others. When you’re just starting out, test everything, including the:

  • Image
  • Description
  • Call-to-action
  • Keywords
  • Bids
  • Audiences

After doing this consistently for a while, you’ll begin to notice which combinations are more effective.

Focus Your Keywords

Although you’re allowed to include up to 150 keywords with a promoted pin, you don’t have to use all of them. If you’re all over the place, you won’t get many click-throughs. Think about the way that your audience interacts with Pinterest.

The keywords should match the way that your target audience uses the platform (similar to how you “theme” keywords for SEO). Make sure that the keywords are also consistent with the information in the pin and the landing page to which they’re directed.

Because Pinterest is a search engine, keywords are crucial to your pins’ visibility. Create your descriptions the way that you would create meta tags for a web page’s title and description. Using trending keywords earlier in the text will help your pins get noticed.

When you place pinnable images on your website, make sure that you include keywords in the alt text. Your boards should contain long-tail keywords. Use Pinterest Analytics to track which pins get the most impressions and experiment with the keywords that you use.

Add Value

The best practices for advertising on some other platforms involve using a call-to-action to send people to a lead page. However, people who search using Pinterest are looking for information. They might get annoyed if they come across your promoted pin, click on it to investigate it further and reach a page that simply asks them for their email address.

An effective way to use Pinterest for advertising is to send people to a landing page where they can explore what you offer. You can certainly include a lead generation form on this page, but don’t make it the only asset at that URL.

Group Boards

Group boards are sometimes referred to as shared, community, collaborative or contributor boards. Using them can lead to significant increases in traffic.

More than one person can add pins to a group board. Therefore, when anyone adds pins to the board, those pins may appear in the home feed of anyone who follows any of the board members. This exponentially increases your reach.

If you focus on sharing your own content to group boards, you’ll gain exposure for your brand. Keep the content relevant, however.

Because Pinterest rewards high-quality pins with exposure, make sure that you join the right group boards. Those that are targeted to a specific theme usually have more traction with an audience and get more engagement. Click on several of the pins on a group board that you’re thinking of joining to make sure that the links aren’t broken or redirect to a spammy or inappropriate site.

Pinterest is an opportune way to expose your brand to a new audience. The platform isn’t just used by crafty people, DIY-ers and foodies. Travel, fashion, design, hobbies, health and beauty, entertainment, accessories and sporting goods are commonly searched categories on Pinterest. Creating a business account for your brand is free, and you can play around with promoting your pins at a low cost to determine whether it works well for your business.

Next Steps

Pinterest holds a lot of opportunity for businesses of all sizes. It’s also straightforward and fairly risk-less to experiment there.

You’ll learn more from running a single experiment than any blog post – so go for it!

If you want to know other ways to use Pinterest for marketing, check out Nate’s post on Pinterest & SEO research in addition to Using Pinterest Analytics.

The post How To Advertise On Pinterest Effectively appeared first on ShivarWeb.

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How To Get Small Business Loans For Restaurants

Restaurants have a (somewhat unfair) reputation for being especially risky businesses that are hard to get off the ground. The good news is that restaurant business loans aren’t especially hard to find, even if you’re looking for a loan to open a restaurant.

Want to know how to get restaurant financing or a loan to open a restaurant? Below, we’ll look at how to finance your restaurant with working capital. If you’re specifically looking to finance restaurant equipment, check out our companion post on restaurant equipment leasing.

Comparison Chart

fundation logo
Read Review Read Review Read Review Read Review Read Review
Borrowing Amount  $10K – $5M $10K – $5M $2K – $100K $20K – $500K $1K – $5M
Term Length Varies by product Varies by product 3 – 36 months 1 – 4 years Varies by product
Required Time In Business Varies by product Varies by product 1 years 12 months 6 months
Required Sales $1.50 for every $1 borrowed $100K/yr $10K/mo
Required Credit Score 640 670 620  660 550

 

kiva logo avant logo
Read Review Read Review Read Review Read Review Read Review
Borrowing Amount  $5K – $500K $5K – $500K $6K – $5M $25 – $10K $1K – $35K
Term Length 3 – 36 months 13 – 52 weeks 6 – 12 months 3 – 36 months 2 – 5 years
Required Time In Business 6 months 9 months 6 months N/A N/A
Required Sales $10K/mo $42K/yr $120K/yr N/A N/A
Required Credit Score 550 550 600  N/A 600

Where To Get Restaurant Business Loans

Most traditional and alternative lenders, at least on paper, offer restaurant lending services. Typically, your ideal option for restaurant funding is a bank or credit union with whom you have an established relationship. In most cases, they’ll offer the best rates and terms.

If you or your business are too risky for a traditional lender, however, there are still restaurant financing options in the form of alternative lenders.

The Cost Of Restaurant Financing

Before we look at your restaurant funding options, you want to be able to compare the offers you might come across.

Here are some of the data points to consider when comparing restaurant loans:

  • Term Length: The amount of time you have to pay back your loan. The longer the term, the higher your interest or factor rate will usually be.
  • Interest/Factor Rate: A percentage or decimal multiplier that determines the amount of money you have to pay back. For short-term loans, this may be a flat fee rather than accumulate over time.
  • Origination Fee: This is a closing fee some lenders charge in addition to interest. It’s either a percentage of the amount you’re borrowing (1% – 5% is typical) or a flat fee. In most cases, it will be deducted from the amount of money you receive from the lender.
  • Administration Fee: This is a fee charged to maintain or set up your account. It may be a percentage or a flat fee. Sometimes charged in place of an origination fee.
  • APR: Annual percentage rate represents what your effective interest rate over a year would be. This can help you determine how expensive a product is relative to another.
  • Payment Schedule: If you’re used to monthly billing, you may be surprised to hear that some lenders expect payments weekly or even daily. May sure you’re prepared for whatever terms you accept.
  • Collateral: An asset, property, or cash deposit used to secure a loan. Not all loans require collateral.

Types Of Restaurant Business Loans

Restaurant loans and related products come in a few different forms. When you’re looking for a lender, you’ll also want an idea of the type of financial product you’re seeking. All of these products will get you the money you’re seeking, but with different terms. Some are cheaper; others are more versatile. Some are more available to applicants with bad credit.

  • Term Loans: Term loans are for a specific amount that, once received, is paid off in regularly scheduled installments (they’re also sometimes called installment loans). Medium and long-term loans usually accrue interest over time while short-term loans have flat fees.
  • Lines Of Credit: Lines of credit are a bit like credit cards. You’ll be approved for credit up to a set limit. You can draw on your account as often as you want as long as you stay below your limit, paying interest only on the outstanding balance.
  • SBA Loans: As is the case for other business types, there are Small Business Administration loans for restaurants. These loans are partially guaranteed by the SBA, allowing you to access better rates. Just bear in mind that the application process is usually more complicated and often slower.
  • Merchant Cash Advance: MCAs aren’t technically loans, but can serve as the financial product of last resort for businesses with bad credit but steady credit card revenue.
  • Equipment Leasing: If you’re looking to finance restaurant equipment, you also have the option to lease it, which you can read about in more detail in our restaurant equipment financing article.

Restaurant Loans For Start-Ups

If you’re looking for start-up restaurant financing, you’ll face a narrower band of options, but you aren’t completely out of luck. Conservative lenders may still consider approving a loan to start a restaurant if you have a good business plan and credit and are able to put some of your own money into the mix. Additionally, some alternative lenders offer loans specifically geared toward brand new businesses.

Restaurant Loan Providers

Not sure where to start looking for small business loans for restaurants? Here are some lenders to consider.

For Good Rates

Wells Fargo

Borrower Requirements:
• Credit score of 640 or higher
Read Our Review

 

As big banks go, Wells Fargo is one of the easier institutions for small businesses to work with. Due to their size and resources, they can offer a wide range of products for restaurants of any size. Their credit restrictions are higher than those of most of alternative lenders and they require you to show strong month-to-month revenue, but they’re more accessible than many of their conservative competitors.

Chase

Borrower Requirements:
• Excellent credit
Read Our Review

 

Chase has a reputation for offering some of the best business loan rates out there. The trick will be qualifying for them. Despite its size and prominence, Chase is very conservative about who they lend to. You’ll also need to have a branch near you as you’ll need to go to your local branch to apply.

StreetShares

Borrower Requirements:
• 1 year in business
• 620 credit score
Get Started With StreetShares

Read Our Review

 

If you don’t have a bank in your area with whom you’ve built a good relationship, you can still find good rates with online lenders. StreetShares is a bit more selective than many of their competitors, but they offer loans and lines of credits at reasonable rates with no collateral.

Fundation

fundation logo
Borrower Requirements:
• 1 year in business
• 660 credit score
• $100K/yr
Get Started With Fundation

Read Our Review

 

Fundation is another option for borrowers with good credit who would prefer (or have) to avoid dealing with a traditional bank. Fundation offers both installment loans and lines of credit with no collateral needed. Just be prepared for a slightly lengthier application process than you’ll typically experience with alternative lenders.

For Borrowers With Bad Credit

Lendio 

Borrower Requirements:
• 6 months in business
• 550 credit score
• $10K/month
Get Started With Lendio

Read Our Review

 

Lendio is an online lending platform that matches businesses with lending partners. This is a handy service for restaurant owners who don’t have a lot of time to compare loans on their own, or who have bad credit. Lendio’s pool of potential lenders is big enough that you’re more likely than not to find one willing to work with you, even if you haven’t been in business very long. If you’re looking for a loan to open a restaurant, however, you may have to look elsewhere.

OnDeck

Borrower Requirements:
• 12 months in business
• 500 credit or higher
• $100K/year
Get Started With OnDeck 

Read Our Review

OnDeck is one of the bigger names in alternative online lending and a solid choice for borrowers with poor credit but decent cash flow. Just be aware that their factor rates use a per month formula rather than a flat fee, which can make them a little bit difficult to compare to many of their competitors.

OnDeck offers installment loans and lines of credit.

LoanBuilder

Borrower Requirements:
• 9 months in business
• 550 credit or higher
• $42,000K/year
Get Started With LoanBuilder 

Read Our Review

LoanBuilder doesn’t offer as many products as some of the other lenders on the list, but they do give you the freedom to tweak the terms of a short-term loan to your liking. Combined with relatively low qualifications and integration with PayPal’s infrastructure, working with them should be pretty painless.

BlueVine

Borrower Requirements:
• 3 months in business
• 530 credit or higher
• $100,000K/year
Get Started With BlueVine 

Read Our Review

If your company is profitable, but you haven’t been in business long enough to build up a good credit score, BlueVine might be the lender for you. Rather than offering installment loans, BlueVine gives you the option of getting a line of credit or, if you do a lot of B2B business, invoice factoring. Just be aware that their lines of credit aren’t available in every state.

For Borrowers Starting Their Restaurant

Kiva

kiva logo
Borrower Requirements:
• A strong professional and social network
Read Our Review

 

If you’re coming up blank with ideas about how to get a loan to start a restaurant, Kiva is one possible solution. Kiva is a nonprofit microlender that operates worldwide. Rather than measure your income and credit, Kiva uses a process called “social underwriting” to measure your community standing and character. Best of all, the loans have zero interest.

So what’s the catch? Well, Kiva uses a type of crowdfunding to finance your loan, which means you’ll be waiting longer to get your funds than you would with most other lenders. You’ll also be limited to a maximum of $10,000, which may not cut it for your business plan. If you have some of your own money to put into your new business and just need to make up that last few thousand dollars, though, it’s worth a look.

Avant

avant logo
Borrower Requirements:
• Credit score of 600 or higher
Read Our Review

 

Another way around the time in business restrictions you’ll often encounter when seeking new restaurant business loans is to forget the “business” part and get a personal loan. While you won’t be able to borrow the large amounts that you can with a business loan, they can get you a modest ($1,000 – $35,000) amount of money with which to start a restaurant.

Note that you’ll still have to show a strong income relative to the amount of money you’re seeking. Additionally, Avant cannot currently lend to individuals in Colorado, Iowa, Vermont, or West Virginia.

Final Thoughts

If you didn’t find what you were looking in our examples above, don’t fret! We’ve barely scratched the surface of the resources restaurants can tap to find funding. If you don’t have much in the way of collateral, you can try to get an unsecured business loan.

If you’re looking to finance restaurant equipment, check out our resources on leasing and equipment loans. Good luck hunting for restaurant business loans! Do your research and you’re sure to find something that fits your needs.

The post How To Get Small Business Loans For Restaurants appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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