How To Accept Credit Card Payments For Your Small Business

Whether you’ve been in business for a while or are just starting out, you know how important it is to be able to accept credit and debit cards as payment from your customers. Credit card usage has soared over the past twenty years or so, while the use of traditional payment methods such as cash and paper checks has dwindled. Put simply, accepting credit cards will lead to increased sales and happier customers.

Unfortunately, adding credit card acceptance to your suite of business tools is neither easy nor inexpensive. The credit card associations (i.e., MasterCard, Visa, etc.) charge a fee known as interchange every time their cards are used, and you’ll need to sign up with a credit card processor to process your transactions and pay those fees for you. Your processor will, in turn, add a markup to your processing charges to cover their costs, and – in most cases – also charge you a bewildering variety of fees for maintaining your account.

In this article, we’ll provide a brief overview of the requirements you’ll need to meet to set up credit and debit card processing for your small business. There are a huge number of providers out there on the market, all offering different variations on the same basic services that most companies need. We’ll give you a quick and dirty explanation of how credit card processing works, what a merchant account is, and whether you need one to accept credit or debit cards. We’ll explain the various options for taking card payments, including the required hardware and software you’ll need to get started. Finally, we’ll give you some tips to help you avoid having your account suddenly frozen or terminated – a situation you can and should avoid.

If you’re looking for the best credit card processing companies for your business, you should take a look at our favorite payment processor shortlist to get you headed in the right direction.

How Credit Card Processing Works

You don’t need to be familiar with all the intimate details of processing a credit card transaction, but it’s a good idea to have a basic understanding of the steps involved and how they go together. A little knowledge of how processing works can help you avoid some of the common problems that can result when a transaction doesn’t go smoothly.

First, you’re going to need a way to accept your customer’s card data. This can be accomplished using either a traditional credit card terminal or a payment gateway in the case of online transactions. Another option is a software service known as a virtual terminal, which turns your computer into a credit card terminal and allows you to either input the card data manually or read it using a compatible card reader.

Once you’ve input your customer’s card data, it’s sent to your provider’s processing system for approval. Your provider’s network will check with the cardholder’s issuing bank to confirm that funds are available to cover the transaction. For debit cards, this is a simple check of the remaining balance on the banking account linked to the card. Credit cards require that the cardholder won’t exceed their available credit if the transaction is approved. The processing networks will also run a few anti-fraud checks to (hopefully) detect a suspicious transaction. If sufficient funds are available and there aren’t any clear indications of fraud, the transaction is approved, and you can complete the sale.

At the end of the day, you’ll upload all completed credit/debit transactions to your processor’s network for processing. This usually occurs automatically if you’re using a payment gateway or a modern credit card terminal. For each transaction, your processor will deduct both the applicable interchange (which is then forwarded to the cardholder’s issuing bank) and their markup. You’ll receive whatever is left over after these fees have been deducted. It usually takes another two to three days for these funds to be transferred back to your bank account.

From our payment processing infographic:

Do You Need A Merchant Account To Accept Credit Cards?

For many years, the only way to accept credit cards was to open a merchant account. At its most basic, a merchant account is simply an account to deposit funds into from processed credit/debit card transactions. Of course, maintaining a merchant account also requires transaction processing services, equipment and software to process the transactions, security features, and numerous other services, depending on the needs of your business. Traditional merchant accounts tend to end up being rather expensive, and merchant services providers often require that you agree to a long-term contract with a hefty early termination fee in case you close your account before the contract expires. As a result, traditional merchant accounts tend to be expensive, especially for a small business that’s trying to minimize their expenses.

In recent years, an alternative has become available that lowers costs for small businesses while still providing most of the essential features available with a full-service merchant account. Payment service providers (PSPs) allow you to accept credit and debit card transactions without a traditional merchant account. PSPs such as Square (see our review) and PayPal (see our review) have revolutionized the processing industry by offering simple, flat-rate pricing, no fees for basic services, and month-to-month billing that eliminates long-term contracts. They’re able to do this by aggregating accounts together, so you won’t have a unique merchant identification number for your business. PSP accounts are easier to set up, but they’re also vulnerable to sudden account freezes or terminations which can make them a risky proposition for businesses that depend on being able to accept cards without interruption.

Cheapest & Easiest Ways To Accept Credit Cards Without A Merchant Account

There are now quite a few well-known PSPs on the market, each one specializing in providing credit card processing services to particular segments of the business community. Here’s a brief overview of each of the most popular options:

Square:

This is the best all-in-one solution for low-volume users, especially those in the retail sector. Square also supports eCommerce businesses, but doesn’t have quite as many features for online enterprises as its competitors. Square features a mobile processing system that uses a new, EMV-compliant card reader, no monthly fees, month-to-month billing, and a simple flat-rate pricing system that’s more affordable for a small business than a traditional merchant account. See our review for complete details.

Shopify:

This is the best option for eCommerce merchants looking to easily set up a fully-featured webstore. While Shopify has better eCommerce tools than Square, it’s also more expensive. Pricing starts at $29.00 per month for the Basic Shopify Plan, with a flat-rate processing fee of 2.9% + $0.30 per online transaction. Billing is month-to-month, but you can receive a discount if you pay for a year (or two) in advance. See our review for more specifics.

 

PayPal:

Easily the oldest and best-known option for online credit card acceptance, PayPal is now available for retail merchants also. While a standard PayPal account comes with no monthly fee, you’ll have to pay $30.00 per month for the PayPal Payments Pro Plan. This upgraded plan includes a virtual terminal and a hosted payments page. PayPal uses a flat-rate pricing plan for processing fees that’s nearly identical to what Square charges. See our review for details about PayPal’s services.

Stripe Payments:

Stripe logo

Very tech-oriented, Stripe only supports eCommerce businesses. They don’t charge any monthly fees and have no long-term contracts. All transactions are processed at a fixed rate of 2.9% + $0.30 per transaction. Stripe offers a huge library of APIs that allow you to customize your eCommerce website just about any way you like. However, utilizing these features will require either extensive coding experience or the services of a developer. Check out our full review for more details about what Stripe has to offer.

Braintree Payment Solutions:

Braintree Payment Solutions logo

Another eCommerce-only provider, Braintree is very similar to Stripe in terms of features and pricing. The primary distinction is that, unlike Stripe, Braintree is a direct processor. This translates to increased account stability, which is very important for an online business where credit and debit cards are just about the only forms of payment you can accept. Braintree charges 2.9% + $0.30 per transaction, but doesn’t require a monthly fee or a long-term contract. They also offer a variety of developer tools to help you customize your website any way you like. For more details, check out our complete review.

When & How To Set Up A Merchant Account

With so many low-cost alternatives available, you may be wondering why you would ever consider the added expense and complication of a full-service merchant account. The primary reason that merchant accounts are still alive and well today is that for many businesses the overall cost of a merchant account is actually lower – sometimes much lower – than using a payment services provider. How is this possible? It primarily comes down to processing rates and how your monthly volume and average ticket size affect them. With a full-service merchant account, you can obtain interchange-plus processing rates that are significantly lower than the flat rates charged by PSPs. Providers such as Square (see our review) have to charge an inflated processing rate to pay for all the ancillary services they aren’t charging you for with a monthly fee. A traditional merchant account provider bills for those services separately, so they can afford to offer a lower per-transaction markup.

Unfortunately, there’s no easy way to determine the point at which it’s more cost-effective to upgrade to a full-service merchant account. The primary factor you’ll want to look at is your monthly processing volume. Your average ticket size is also important, but to a lesser extent. We’ve seen providers recommend merchant accounts for businesses processing anywhere from $1500 to $10,000 per month at a minimum, and sometimes even more. Where to draw the line will ultimately depend on the unique needs of your business, and what options for upgrading are available to you. You’ll want to compare your current processing costs with an estimate based on a quote from a merchant account provider to see which option is cheaper. Be sure to factor in all the hidden costs that come with merchant accounts. You can usually uncover these in the fine print of your proposed contract.

For more, see our complete guide to credit card processing rates and fees.

Account stability is also an important factor. With a PSP, a single unusually high transaction can be enough to have your account suspended or even terminated. For some businesses, particularly eCommerce merchants, this can be catastrophic. While this situation can still happen with a traditional merchant account also, it’s far less likely and you’ll have better access to customer service to get your account working again if it does occur.

Setting up an account with a PSP is usually very easy. Most PSPs have online application forms that you can fill out and submit without ever having to talk to a sales agent. If you need a card reader, your PSP will mail it to you. Account activation is usually also accomplished online.

Traditional merchant accounts are more complicated to set up. You’ll need to contact the sales team at the provider you’re interested in and negotiate the terms of your agreement. There’s also a lot more paperwork, although some providers now offer you the opportunity to complete your merchant application online. Beware that automation can sometimes work against you when setting up a merchant account, as some sales agents are now using tablet devices to get your electronic signature. This practice often locks you into a long-term contract before you’ve had any chance to review your contract terms and conditions. Insist on a paper copy of all contract documents and study them very carefully before you sign anything. For some suggestions on making this process go more smoothly, please see our article How to Negotiate the Perfect Credit Card Processing Deal.

How To Accept In-Store Credit Card Payments

For retail merchants, you’re going to need at least one credit card machine per location. These days, you have a choice between a traditional countertop credit card terminal and a point of sale (POS) system. Countertop terminals can process transactions, but most models offer little or no other functionality. A POS system, on the other hand, can handle things like inventory management, employee scheduling, and a host of other features to help you run your business. Naturally, POS systems cost more than most countertop terminals, although tablet-based systems such as ShopKeep (see our review) are more affordable (and mobile) than a standalone POS terminal.

Whatever type of equipment you decide to purchase, make sure it’s EMV-compatible. EMV (Europay, MasterCard, and Visa) is now the standard method for accepting credit and debit cards in the United States, and since the EMV liability shift in October 2015, you can be held responsible for a fraudulent transaction if you accept an EMV-enabled card using the magstripe instead of the chip. EMV-compatible terminals are widely available and less expensive than ever. With most customers now carrying EMV cards, there’s really no good reason to continue using a magstripe-only card reader.

If you want the latest and greatest in card acceptance technology, it’s pretty easy to find a terminal or POS system that accepts NFC-based payment methods. NFC stands for near-field communications, and it’s found on payment systems such as Apple Pay, Google Pay, and Samsung Pay. NFC technology is built into most modern smartphones, tablets, and even smartwatches. While it hasn’t seen widespread adoption by the general public yet, it’s gaining in use as more people become aware of its availability and convenience.

Regardless of what type of terminal or POS system you decide to get for your business, we highly encourage you to buy your equipment outright rather than signing up for a lease. Equipment leasing is still being pushed by sales agents, who cite misleading arguments about the low up-front cost and the possibility of writing off the lease payments on your taxes. While these arguments are technically true, they mask the reality that leasing a terminal or POS system will cost you far more in the long run than buying. Equipment leases typically come with four-year contracts that are completely noncancelable. The monthly lease payments will, over the term of the lease, far exceed the cost to simply buy the equipment. Adding insult to injury, you won’t even own your equipment when the lease finally expires. Instead, you’ll either have to continue making monthly lease payments or buy the equipment (often at an inflated price). For more details on why leasing is such a bad idea, see our article Why You Shouldn’t Lease A Credit Card Machine.

How To Accept Credit Card Payments Online

If your business is eCommerce-only, you’ll have it a little easier because you won’t need a credit card terminal or POS system. However, you will need either a payment gateway or at least a virtual terminal to accept payments from your customers. A virtual terminal is simply a software application that turns your computer into a credit card terminal. Mail order and telephone order businesses use them to enter their customers’ credit card data manually. They can also be combined with a card reader (usually USB-connected) to accept card-present transactions. For retail merchants, a virtual terminal can replace a dedicated countertop terminal if you add a card reader. Unfortunately, we haven’t seen many EMV-capable card readers that are compatible with virtual terminals yet.

A payment gateway is a web-based software service that connects your eCommerce website with your processor’s payment networks. Payment gateways allow customers to enter credit card data from wherever they are, as long as they have access to the internet. Most merchant services providers charge a monthly fee (usually around $25.00) for the use of a payment gateway. You might also have to pay an additional $0.05 – $0.10 per transaction for the use of the gateway in some cases. Authorize.Net (see our review) is one of the most popular payment gateway providers, but there are many others today as well. Many of the larger processors now offer their own proprietary gateways that include the same security and ease-of-use features that you’d find in a more well-known gateway. For more information on payment gateways, see our article The Complete Guide to Online Credit Card Processing With a Payment Gateway.

Depending on how many products you sell on your website and the options you want to give your customers, you may or may not need to use an online shopping cart in conjunction with your payment gateway. Shopping carts allow you to feature products, conduct secure transactions online, and perform a variety of other functions related to running your business. You’ll want to ensure that your chosen shopping cart is compatible with your payment gateway before you set up your site. Most of the popular shopping carts today are compatible with almost all of the more well-known payment gateways. For more information on online shopping carts, see our article Shopping Carts 101: How to Choose a Shopping Cart for Your Business.

How To Accept Credit Card Payments With Your Mobile Phone

When Square (see our review) first introduced their original card reader in 2009, it was revolutionary. For the first time, merchants could accept credit or debit cards using their smartphones or tablets. Square was (and still is) a great choice for very small businesses, startups, and merchants who operate seasonally. Naturally, they’ve spawned a lot of competitors, and today almost all merchant services providers offer some type of mobile payment system.

Visit Square

These systems inevitably include both an app for your smart device and a card reader. Unfortunately, many of the apps are very basic and don’t offer the depth of features that Square does. Card readers have lagged behind current technology, with many providers still offering magstripe-only readers. The current trend among smartphone manufacturers to remove the headphone jack has also caused problems, as most mobile card readers use a plug that fits into the jack to connect to the device. Today, Square and a few other providers now offer upgraded card readers that feature both EMV compatibility and Bluetooth connectivity. These card readers are significantly more expensive than the older models, but they’re still cheaper than a traditional countertop terminal. For businesses that need to accept transactions out in the field, they’re lighter and far less costly than wireless terminals, which usually run at least twice as much as their wired brethren and require a separate wireless data plan. For more information on mobile payment systems, please see our article on why accepting credit cards with your phone is the easiest option.

Can You Accept Credit Card Payments For Free?

Whether you ultimately use a PSP or a traditional merchant account, you’re still going to pay several percent from every sale to cover your processing costs. While there are many ways to get this percentage down to a reasonable level and avoid overpaying, at some point you’re going to ask yourself why you have to pay for processing instead of your customers. After all, they’re the ones who consciously choose to pay with credit and debit cards rather than cash or a paper check. Wouldn’t it be nice if there was a way to transfer this expense to your customers rather than having it come out of your profits?

In fact, there is a way to do this. Transferring the cost of processing onto your customers, also known as surcharging, is allowed in 41 states. However, the practice is currently going through a series of legal challenges that will ultimately either lead to it being banned or expanded into all jurisdictions. With surcharging, your processor will calculate the processing charge when a transaction is submitted for approval and add it to your customer’s bill.

Needless to say, your customers aren’t going to like unexpectedly having a few percentage points added to their bill just for using a credit card. For this reason, surcharging isn’t popular with most merchants, and you’ll usually only encounter it in certain industries where it’s become an accepted practice, such as taxi cabs and busses. For most merchants, it’s much easier to “adjust” your prices to cover your anticipated processing costs rather than passing those costs directly onto your customers. For a more in-depth look at surcharging, check out our article The Truth Behind Free Credit Card Processing.

How To Avoid Account Terminations & Funding Holds

Once you’ve got your merchant account up and running, you’ll naturally want it to be available and fully functional every day. While this isn’t normally a problem, account holds, freezes, and terminations sometimes occur. You’ll want to understand how this happens, and what you can do to prevent it from happening to you.

An account hold usually occurs when a single transaction is held up, and you don’t receive the funds you were expecting. In most cases, your processor’s risk department has flagged the transaction as suspicious, and you won’t get your funds until they can investigate and confirm that the transaction is legitimate. A single transaction that’s for much more money than your average ticket size is most likely to trigger a hold. Fortunately, you should still be able to process other transactions while the matter is being resolved.

This isn’t the case with an account freeze, unfortunately. Your processor can and will freeze your account – preventing you from getting paid for previous transactions or processing new ones – if fraud is suspected that would affect your entire account. While the wait can be excruciating, account freezes are usually temporary unless your processor decides to terminate your account.

As the name implies, an account termination is final. Your account is shut down, and you won’t be able to reopen it. The risk of an account termination is higher with a PSP than a traditional merchant account. Account terminations usually occur when your processor determines that you’ve misrepresented your business and the type of goods you’re selling. It doesn’t matter if this was intentional or just an honest mistake on your part. If your business type is one that usually falls into the high-risk category, save yourself the aggravation and get a high-risk merchant account from a provider who specializes in these kinds of accounts. It will cost you more, but you’ll have a much more stable account. For more information on the various hiccups that can affect your merchant account, please see our article How to Avoid Merchant Account Holds, Freezes, and Terminations.

Final Thoughts

If you’ve read this far, you’re probably thinking that merchant accounts and credit card processing are pretty complicated. You’re right! There’s a lot to know, and unfortunately, there’s also a lot of misinformation out there. The credit card processing industry has a lousy reputation for misleading sales practices, high costs, hidden charges, and long-term contracts that are very difficult to get out of. The main reason that PSPs like Square (see our review) have become so popular is that they offer a simpler, more transparent alternative to traditional merchant account providers, both in terms of costs and contract requirements.

For many businesses, however, Square can actually be more expensive than signing up for a traditional merchant account, even when factoring in the various account fees and the cost of buying processing equipment. While we heartily recommend Square for very small businesses and startups, realize that if your business grows large enough, you’ll eventually want to switch to a full-service merchant account. You’ll enjoy lower costs, improved account stability and (hopefully) better customer support. PayPal is also a great choice for eCommerce businesses that are just starting out. Again, if your business grows large enough, a full-service merchant account with a fully-featured payment gateway will be a better choice.

Note that this article only provides a relatively brief overview of the significant factors that affect credit card processing for small businesses. For more information, please take a look at the other articles we’ve linked to above for a deeper dive into subjects you aren’t already familiar with. For an overview of several highly recommended providers, please see our article The 5 Best Small Business Credit Card Processing Companies. You can also compare several excellent providers side-by-side using our Merchant Account Comparison Chart.

The post How To Accept Credit Card Payments For Your Small Business appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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Debt Service Coverage Ratio: How To Calculate And Improve Your Business’s DSCR

Debt Service Coverage Ratio (DSCR)

Applying for small business loans can be stressful. But it wouldn’t be so bad if you knew exactly what lenders are looking for, right? One of the biggest factors in lending decisions is your debt service coverage ratio (DSCR).

But what is the DSCR and how can you figure out what yours is?

In this post, we’ll cover everything you need to know about the debt service coverage ratio. We’ll teach you what a DSCR is, how to calculate your debt service coverage ratio, what a good DSCR looks like, how to increase your debt service coverage ratio, and more.

What Is The Debt Service Coverage Ratio?

The debt service coverage ratio (DSCR) measures the relationship between your business’s income and its debt. Your business’s DSCR is calculated by dividing your net operating income by your current year’s debt obligations.

The debt service coverage ratio is used by lenders to determine if your business generates enough income to afford a business loan. Lenders also use this number to determine how risky your business is and how likely you are to successfully make your monthly payments for the length of the loan.

Why Is The Debt Service Coverage Ratio Important?

The debt service coverage ratio is important for two reasons:

  1. It shows how healthy your business’s cash flow is.
  2. It plays a factor in how likely your business is to qualify for a loan.

The debt service coverage ratio is a good way to monitor your business’s health and financial success. By calculating your DSCR before you start applying for loans, you can know whether or not your business can actually afford to make payments on a loan.

A high DSCR indicates that your business generates enough income to manage payments on a new loan and still make a profit. A low DSCR indicates that you may have trouble making payments on a loan, or may even have a negative cash flow. If this is the case, you may need to increase your DSCR before taking on more debt.

In this way, knowing your DSCR can help you analyze your business’s current financial state and help you make an informed business decision before applying for a loan.

For lenders, the debt service coverage ratio is important as well. Your DSCR is one of the main indicators lenders look at when evaluating your loan application.

Lenders use the DSCR to see how likely you are to make your monthly loan payments. They also look at how much of an income cushion you have to cover any fluctuations in cash flow while still keeping up with payments. This ratio can also help lenders determine the borrowing amount they can offer you.

Here are some of the benefits of a high DSCR ratio:

  • More likely to qualify for a loan
  • More likely to receive an offer with better terms
  • Increases your chances of lower interest rates and a higher borrowing amount
  • Indicates your business can manage debt while still bringing in income
  • Shows your business has a positive cash flow

Unlike your debt-to-income (DTI) ratio, which is healthiest when it is low, the higher your debt service coverage ratio, the better. It is not uncommon for lenders to ask for your debt service coverage ratio from previous years or for up to three years of projected debt service coverage ratios.

How To Calculate Your Debt Service Coverage Ratio

The debt service coverage ratio differs from the debt-to-income ratio in another significant way — lenders don’t all agree on how the DSCR should be calculated.

Different lenders have different ways of calculating your debt service coverage ratio. Some lump the business owner’s personal income in with the business’s income; others don’t. We’ll teach you the most common way to calculate DSCR, but be sure to check with your potential lender for the most accurate DSCR calculation.

Most often, the debt service coverage ratio is calculated by dividing your business’s net operating income by your current year’s debt obligations:

Net Operating Income / Current Year’s Debt Obligations = Debt Service Coverage Ratio

But what is net operating income and how do you determine your current year’s total debt?

Net Operating Income

Your net operating income is your total revenue or income generated from selling products or services, minus your operating expenses. According to the Houston Chronicle:

Operating expenses are those directly related to acquiring and selling your products and services. Such expenses might include costs to make or buy inventory, wages, utilities, rent, supplies and advertising. Operating expenses exclude interest payments to creditors, income taxes and losses from activities outside your main business.

Net operating income is also sometimes referred to as a business’s EBIT (earnings before interest and taxes). To calculate your net operating income, use accounting reports to find your annual income and average operating expenses.

Note: Some lenders calculate your debt service coverage using your EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization) instead of your EBIT.

Current Year’s Debt Obligations 

Your current year’s debt obligations refer to the total amount of debt payments you must repay in the upcoming year.

This includes all of your loan payments, interest payments, loan fees, business credit card payments, and any business lease payments. Tally up your monthly charges and multiply them by 12 to get your total year’s debt.

Examples

Now that you know how to figure your net operating income and total debt, let’s do an example using the DSCR formula from earlier:

Net Operating Income / Current Year’s Debt Obligations = Debt Service Coverage Ratio

Let’s say you’re calculating your debt service coverage ratio to see if you can take on a new small business loan to expand your business.

Say your business earns $65,000 in revenue annually but pays $15,000 in operating expenses. That leaves you with a net operating income of $50,000.

Now, let’s say each month you spend $2,000 on your mortgage, $400 on a previous loan, and $100 on your business credit card. That means you pay $2,500/mo on debt. Since the DSCR calculation requires the current year’s debt, we need to multiply our monthly debt by 12. That gives us a total of $30,000 in debt obligations for the year. Now, let’s plug these numbers in.

50,000 / 30,000 = Debt Service Coverage Ratio

50,000 / 30,000 = 1.666667

When you divide 50,000 by 30,000 you get 1.666667. Round this number to the nearest hundredth to get a current debt service coverage ratio of 1.67.

Now you’ve successfully calculated a debt service coverage ratio! Try plugging your own business’s numbers into the formula. And be sure to remember that this is only one way of calculating your DSCR. While this way is fairly common, be sure to ask your lender how they calculate DSCR for the most accurate ratio.

What Is A Good Debt Service Coverage Ratio?

So now you know how to calculate your DSCR, but you may not know what makes a DSCR good or bad. How can you tell whether your debt service coverage ratio will qualify you to take out a new loan or if it means you’re in trouble?

When it comes to DSCR, the higher the ratio the better. Let’s say your DSCR is 1.67, like in our earlier example; that means you have 67% more income than you need to cover your current debts. If you have a DSCR ratio of 1, that means you have exactly enough income to pay your debts but aren’t making any extra profit. If your DSCR is below one, then you have a negative cash flow and can only partially cover your debts.

Obviously, you don’t want a negative cash flow, and breaking even doesn’t quite cut the mustard if you want to take out a loan. So what’s the ideal debt service coverage ratio that lenders look for?

In general, a good debt service coverage ratio is 1.25. Anything higher is an optimal DSCR. Lenders want to see that you can easily pay your debts while still generating enough income to cover any cash flow fluctuations. However, each lender has their own required debt service coverage ratio. Additionally, accepted debt service coverage ratios can vary depending on the economy. According to Fundera contributor, Rieva Lesonsky:

In general, lenders are looking for debt-service coverage ratios of 1.25 or more. In some cases — when the economy is doing great — they might accept a ratio as low as 1.15, but in others — when the economy is tight — they may require a ratio of 1.35 or even 1.5.

FitSmallBusiness writer, Priyanka Prakash, notes that multiple aspects of your loan application can affect whether you are approved as well, not just your DSCR. Prakash says:

Your lender may be willing to overlook a slightly lower DSCR if other aspects of your application, such as business revenue and credit score, are very strong.

Be sure to carefully research each lender’s application process and qualification requirements before applying for a loan. Again, make sure you know how that specific lender calculates DSCR. This is important both for before you apply and after you are accepted as many lenders require you to maintain a certain DSCR throughout the length of your loan.

Most lenders will reevaluate your DSCR each year, but you may want to check your debt service coverage ratio even more often to make sure you’re on track to meet your lender’s requirements. If you don’t meet their DSCR requirements, they may say you’re in violation of your loan agreement and expect you to pay the loan in full within a short time period.

To be safe, it’s always best to know exactly what your lender’s policies are and try to keep your DSCR as high as possible.

Using DSCR To Determine Whether You Can Afford A Loan

Not only can you use your DSCR to check your business’s financial health and ability to pay its debt, you can also use it to determine if you can afford a loan and how big of a loan you should take out.

Let’s return to our example from earlier. Your business is trying to decide if it can afford to take out a business expansion loan. We calculated your current DSCR at 1.67, which means you have an extra 67% of income after you’ve paid your debts. This is well above the 1.25 DSCR mark, but it doesn’t necessarily indicate the size of the loan you can reasonably afford to borrow.

Take your annual income and divide it by 1.25 to figure out how much you can afford to pay back each year:

Net Operating Income / 1.25 = Borrowing Amount

50,000 / 1.25 = 40,000

In our example, your current year’s debt obligations were $30,000/year. From the calculation above, we can see that you can afford to pay up to $40,000 a year on your debt obligations. So, you can take on an extra $10,000/year in debt (because $40,000 – $30,000 = $10,000). That amounts to roughly $830/mo.

If you approach a potential lender knowing exactly how much you can afford to pay each month, you can avoid being pressured into borrowing more than you can afford.

If you aren’t comfortable with a 1.25 DSCR and would rather have a little more wiggle room, that’s totally fine. Don’t ever borrow more than you are comfortable with. The good thing is, you can use the debt service coverage ratio to see exactly how much you can safely borrow while maintaining your desired DSCR. Simply replace “1.25” in the formula above with your desired ratio to figure the payments you can afford.

How To Improve Your Debt Service Coverage Ratio

To increase your chances of getting a loan — or to maintain payments on your existing loan — you may need to improve your DSCR. Here are a few ways to increase your debt service coverage ratio:

  • Increase your net operating income
  • Decrease your operating expenses
  • Pay off some of your existing debt
  • Decrease your borrowing amount

To increase your net operating income, consider various ways to increase your revenue. Maybe offer additional services or goods or raise your prices. Try a new marketing strategy that brings in additional buyers or offer an extra incentive to existing buyers to make them purchase more goods.

Increasing sales isn’t the only way to increase your net operating income. A huge portion of your net operating income comes down to operating expenses. Cut back unnecessary expenses. Find ways to streamline your work processes and make employees more productive during work hours. Ask your existing vendors about discounts for buying in bulk. Maybe even consider eliminating products that don’t sell well or are too time-consuming and expensive to make.

Besides increasing your net operating income, a good way to lower your debt service coverage ratio is to lower your existing debt. Carefully evaluate your budget. Cut unnecessary expenses and allocate that money to paying down your debt instead. You can pay off your debt quickly using various methods like the debt snowball method or the debt avalanche method. Depending on your financial situation, consolidating your business debt might also be a good option.

Final Thoughts

For small business searching for funding, the debt service coverage ratio plays a huge factor in lending decisions. Lenders use your DSCR to determine whether you can afford to make regular loan payments and how much you can borrow.

But more than that, your debt service ratio is also a great tool for understanding your business’s financial health and cash flow. Your DSCR can show you both how much income your company has after debt payments and whether it’s financially wise to take out a loan. The higher your DSCR, the better.

As always, we recommend carefully evaluating your financial situation before seeking a loan. Calculate your DSCR, see if you can afford to take on a loan, and know exactly how you are going to use that loan before you borrow. With debt service coverage ratios, it’s more important than ever to carefully research your lender’s requirements as each has their own way of calculating the DSCR. And don’t forget to confirm whether your lender requires you to maintain a specific DSCR for the length of the loan.

Looking for good lending options? Our small business loan reviews cover both online lenders and major banks. To evaluate multiple low-interest lenders at once, it’s a good idea to use a free loan matchmaking service, often called a “loan aggregator.”

Merchant Maverick has partnered with Mirador Finance, a financial technology company, to bring you the Merchant Maverick Community of Lenders. By filling out one application, you can be matched to multiple potential lenders. Check your eligibility below.

Borrower requirements:
• Free loan aggregation service; requirements vary by area and lender.
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The post Debt Service Coverage Ratio: How To Calculate And Improve Your Business’s DSCR appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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The Best Credit Card Reader For Your Small Business

So you want to use your cell phone or tablet to start accepting payments for your business. Whether this is your first time around or you’re just wondering if it’s time to update that old credit card reader you’ve had for four years, there’s certainly a lot to consider. What kind of technology is out there? How much does a cell phone credit card reader cost? Should I get a credit card machine and POS instead? Which are the best credit card readers?

I’ve seen a lot of mobile card readers in my time. And the first thing to understand is that the card reader is tied to the mobile processing app (mobile point of sale, or mPOS for short). Sadly, we can’t just mix and match one card reader with another app. So before anything, you need to look at the software and make sure it’s a good fit for your needs. You should also check the processing rates and the cost of the hardware.

Apart from aesthetics, the reality is there aren’t a lot of differences between one card reader and the next. They all have the same core features, and they all use the same sort of security. Reliability is as much a product of the app design as it is the hardware design, sometimes moreso. So while you do want a good, affordably priced credit card reader, you should first narrow down the list of potentials using the software as your main criteria. Once that’s done, you can take a closer look at all the hardware.

If you are curious about what your hardware options are, read on! I’ve compiled a list of the most popular credit card readers and their specs. Make sure you read our reviews for each mobile app so that you understand the drawbacks and shortcomings of each as well as all the advantages.

But first, let’s set the record straight.

Credit Card Reader vs. Credit Card Machine: Know Your Terms

So what’s the difference between a credit card reader and a credit card machine? While it’s certainly possible that you might encounter some people who use the terms interchangeably, “credit card reader” is generally the term for small mobile devices that connect to smartphones and tablets and process transactions through a mobile app. This connection can be physical or wireless. However, the smartphone or tablet typically has to also have either cellular signal or a Wi-Fi connection.

A credit card machine (also called a credit card terminal) is larger, not mobile, and generally connects to a full-fledged POS. They may or may not have an integrated receipt printer or a PIN pad device for customers. Credit card machines require a connection to either a phone line or the Internet to function. Some machines are capable of wireless Internet connections, but they do add to the cost.

The biggest difference between a credit card reader and a credit card machine is price, though. A mobile card reader can cost anything from $10 to about $80, whereas the typical entry-level price for a machine is about $120. However, depending on what features are included, a credit card terminal can cost $600 or more.

Types of Credit Card Readers for Phone & Tablet

When categorizing credit card readers, you need to consider two criteria: how the device connects to your phone or tablet, and which payment methods the device accepts (we’re not talking about manual entry options just yet).

Phone Connection Options:

  • 3.5mm/Headphone Jack: Most of your entry-level credit card readers will connect to a phone or tablet via the 3.5mm headphone jack. However, it’s worth noting that this design is slowly fading out. Part of the driving force is Apple’s removal of the headphone jack from its iPhones, but I think it’s also a result of our overall shift toward wireless. It’s worth pointing out that both Square and PayPal have Lighting to 3.5mm headphone jack adapters that will allow you to continue to use their magstripe readers.
  • Bluetooth: Bluetooth readers are becoming increasingly common. They’re compatible with both iOS systems, they’re secure, and they allow for some sophisticated card reader designs. The one downside to Bluetooth readers is that they can run low on power quickly if they’re always connected without a “sleep” mode.

Generally speaking, credit card readers for smartphones and tablets support one of these connection methods, but not both. There’s always an exception to the rule, however. With Apple moving toward Lightning ports for everything, it’s worth getting a Bluetooth device, which will ensure that no matter what smartphone or tablet you get in the future, the card reader will be able to connect.

Supported Payment Methods

  • Magstripe: Until 2015, magstripe transactions were the only form of credit card payment commonly accepted in the US. Magstripe transactions (also referred to as swipe transactions because they are made by swiping the card through a terminal or card reader) are still supported, but becoming superfluous as other, more secure payment methods become available.
  • EMV: In October 2015, a major liability shift occurred, shifting responsibility for fraudulent swipe transactions onto merchants, if that card had an EMV chip and the merchant did not have an EMV-enabled credit card reader. As a result, you probably saw a surge of chip cards appear, and payment processors rushed to introduced new hardware capable of processing chip card transactions. Chip cards are more secure and can help reduce in-person fraudulent transactions.
  • NFC/Contactless: Apple Pay, Android Pay, Samsung Pay, and all of the other “Pay” apps you’ve seen rely on NFC (near-field communication) technology. Transactions are often called contactless or “tap” transactions.

All mobile card readers on the market accept some combination of these three payment methods. As a merchant, it’s important that you are able to process EMV transactions to protect yourself against liability for fraudulent transactions.

Card Readers for iOS vs. Card Readers for Android: Is There a Difference?

Generally speaking, mPOS apps tend to offer more features to tablet users, especially iPads. But apart from enhanced features for tablets, there usually isn’t much difference between apps for iOS vs. apps for Android.

The same goes for mobile card readers. Unless the app itself is built to function only on one operating system, a card reader for iPhone or iPad works with an Android phone or tablet. So if your business has a mix of Android and iOS devices, you can use your hardware on both. You’ll just have to worry about pairing and re-pairing any Bluetooth devices as needed.

Now that we’ve identified the defining traits of credit card readers, let’s look at the mobile card readers from the most popular mPOS systems: Square and PayPal.

Square Credit Card Readers

Square (read our review) is definitely a leader in the mPOS industry, both for its software and hardware. It was one of the first mobile systems to embrace chip cards and it seems to put a high priority on keeping its hardware affordable.

The one piece of Square hardware that we haven’t included here is the Square Register, which is more of a full-fledged POS than a mobile system. Check out our full review of Square Register for a closer look at the system.

Square Magstripe Reader

If I wanted to be extremely hyperbolic, I would say that Square’s magstripe reader is synonymous with mobile processing. Instead, I’ll just say that the white and boxy device certainly is iconic. The overall design hasn’t changed in years. Available for free if you order directly from Square or $9.99 at retail stores such as Staples (Square will reimburse you later), this entry-level device connects via the headphone jack, and as the name says, handles magstripe transactions only.

  • Cost: Free ($9.99 reimbursed if bought at a retail location)
  • Connection: 3.5mm
  • Payment Types Supported: Magstripe

Square Chip Card Reader

If you just glance at the Square Chip Card Reader (read our unboxing review), you might not notice any immediate differences between the magstripe reader and the chip card reader. That’s because Square didn’t exactly reinvent the wheel. The Chip Card Reader is slightly thicker than the original, with an extra slot for inserting the chip end of a credit or debit card. Unlike the magstripe reader, you need to periodically charge this model. Square sells the Chip Card reader for $29, which is, all considered, a pretty good price for a device that can handle magstripe and EMV transactions.

  • Cost: $29
  • Connection: 3.5mm
  • Payment Types Supported: Magstripe, EMV

Square Contactless & Chip Card Reader

The Contactless and Chip Card Reader from Square doesn’t exactly break the mold as far as design: White, boxy, with Square’s logo set into it. What’s that expression? If it isn’t broke, don’t fix it?

Unlike the previous two card readers, the contactless and chip card reader relies on a Bluetooth connection to process transactions. And it doesn’t support magstripe cards at all. To get around this, Square includes a magstripe reader in the package as well.

The contactless and chip reader sells for a very reasonable $49, but if the upfront investment makes you cringe a bit, Square also offers an installment plan that will allow you to pay off a portion of the cost each week. Expect to pay a little bit more in the long term as a trade-off for the convenience of the installment plan, but it’s nowhere near as bad a hardware lease program from a traditional merchant account.

The contactless and chip reader is a slim, slick little device and you can certainly use it in a handheld mobile situation. But Square also sells a clever little dock to charge the device and still allow you to use it. The dock goes for $29 on its own, but it is optional.

  • Cost: $49 (dock available for additional $29)
  • Connection: Bluetooth
  • Payment Types Supported: EMV, NFC/Contactless (separate magstripe reader included)

Square Stand

The Square Stand isn’t really a card reader — it’s an iPad stand with an integrated magstripe reader. But it was one of the devices that helped make Square so popular with merchants. These days Square sells the stand with a contactless and chip card reader plus the dock. But it merits a mention here because it shows that mobile card readers can also be used in countertop/retail setups. Square even sells bundles and kits with everything you need to get set up.

The Square Stand plus the card readers will run you $169, which is less than you’d pay for all the individual components — the stand ($99 originally). The contactless and chip card reader ($49), and the dock ($29). Bundles that include a cash drawer and receipt printer start upwards of $500, not including the iPad.

  • Cost: $169
  • Connection: Bluetooth
  • Payment Types Supported: EMV, NFC, Magstripe (integrated into tablet stand)

PayPal Credit Card Readers

The other major name in the mPOS space (and commerce in general) is PayPal. The company’s mobile processing app, PayPal Here (read our review), isn’t quite as full-featured as Square, but you’ll find a lot of similarities between the two, especially as far as business model.

PayPal Mobile Card Reader

PayPal’s mobile card reader is a standard magstripe reader with a headphone jack connector. While the color has changed from PayPal blues to black, the overall shape hasn’t: it’s still a simple and quite stable triangle that connects via a headphone jack. There’s no frills or fuss here.

PayPal used to offer the mobile card reader for free through its website, but that’s no longer the case. It’ll cost you $14.99 to get started, though it’s worth the extra money to upgrade to at least an EMV reader.

  • Cost: $14.99
  • Connection: 3.5mm
  • Payment Types Supported: Magstripe

PayPal Chip & Swipe Reader

PayPal’s Chip and Swipe reader is a step up from its Mobile Card Reader, with a sleek rectangular design. It’s about the size of a credit card and slim at just half an inch thick. Plus, $24.99 for a Bluetooth device that accepts both EMV and magstripe, makes it one of the more affordable options for card readers, especially if all you need is mobile support.

  • Cost: $24.99
  • Connection: Bluetooth
  • Payment Types Supported: Magstripe, EMV

PayPal Chip & Tap Reader

If you want more than just magstripe and EMV support, PayPal also sells a Chip and Tap reader that allows you to accept Apple Pay, Android Pay, and other contactless methods. The Chip and Tap reader looks quite a bit different from the Chip and Swipe reader. Though it’s still black, it’s boxy and measures 0.75 inches in depth.

I actually hate to say this, but the PayPal reader reminds me a bit of Clover Go’s all-in-one reader, just more refined. And unlike the Chip and Swipe reader, this design is meant for both mobile and countertop use — and PayPal offers a charging dock for those who are interested in a countertop setup.

Alone, the reader sells for $59.99, but a bundled kit with the reader and dock sells for $80 (PayPal indicates that’s a markdown from $89.99 on its website). I don’t see the dock listed for sale separately, but I would assume it would sell for $30 on its own.

  • Cost: $59.99 (bundle available for $79.99)
  • Connection: Bluetooth
  • Payment Types Supported: Magstripe, EMV, NFC/Contactless

PayPal Chip Card Reader

PayPal’s Chip Card Reader was actually the first EMV-enabled reader the company offered, and it wasn’t PayPal’s own design. The reader is actually a branded Miura M010, which has also previously been offered by Square, and is still available from Shopify as well.

The Chip Card Reader is a handy little mobile reader, but you can get a dock for it and mount it in a countertop setup (at least, until PayPal possibly phases this device out of its lineup). Despite its rather bland name, this reader accepts magstripe, EMV, and NFC/contactless payments. However, it comes at a steep price $79, which is still less than the original $150 it sold for. It’s worth noting that despite the PIN pad, it doesn’t support PIN entry because PayPal Here doesn’t support debit transactions.

  • Cost: $79
  • Connection: Bluetooth
  • Payment Types Supported: Magstripe, EMV, NFC/Contactless

Alternatives to Square & PayPal Readers

While Square and PayPal are certainly two of the biggest names, they’re not the only options if you need a mobile credit card reader. Let’s take a look at some of the other processors and what hardware they offer.

Shopify

Shopify is mostly associated with eCommerce, but it’s moved toward an all-in-one approach that includes a POS (read our review). The full-fledged POS package is designed for a countertop setup and syncs with your Shopify store. However, for a very reasonable $9/month, you can get the Shopify Lite plan, which supports sales through social media and a buy button on your own website, as well as access to the mobile POS. Keep in mind that this is designed almost exclusively for retail environments. For mobile users, though, Shopify offers two readers.

Shopify Tap, Chip & Swipe Reader 

I mentioned before that PayPal’s Chip Card Reader is actually made by another company and is called the Miura M010. Shopify licenses the same device and calls it the Tap, Chip and Swipe reader.

Again, you have a Bluetooth connection with support for magstripe, EMV, and contactless transactions. Shopify sells the reader for $89, which is on the higher end of things. The dock sells for $39. However, the reader is well designed and very functional, and if you want to accept Apple Pay and other “Pay” apps with Shopify, it’s the only option.

  • Cost: $89 (dock available for $39)
  • Connection: Bluetooth
  • Payment Types Supported: Magstripe, EMV, NFC/Contactless

Shopify Chip and Swipe Reader 

Shopify’s Chip and Swipe Reader is a sleek white device. As the name implies, the reader can handle both magstripe and EMV transactions, but not contactless/NFC. I like that it comes with a dock charging dock by default, instead of as a pricey add-on.

The retail price for the reader is listed as $29, but as I am writing this, Shopify is offering it for free. The Chip and Swipe Reader is easily one of the more beautiful card readers I’ve seen, as well as innovative and well priced.

  • Cost: $29
  • Connection: Bluetooth
  • Payment Types Supported: Magstripe, EMV

Payline Mobile

Payline Data is a traditional merchant account processor, but its Payline Mobile app (read our review) is actually a viable standalone processing option even for low-volume and seasonal merchants. The company offers a standard magstripe reader (the Ingenico G5X) that isn’t particularly interesting. Its other mobile reader, though, is the Ingenico RP457c, and it is definitely one of the more innovative card reader designs I’ve ever seen.

For starters, the RP457c can connect to cell phones and tablets through the headphone jack or Bluetooth, which is very uncommon. It also supports magstripe, EMV, and NFC transactions all in one. The device is designed to clamp onto phones or rest in a dock for use as a wireless reader.

Payline doesn’t disclose its current pricing for the RP457c, in part because some merchants may be eligible for a free device. However, I was able to confirm that the reader retails for $150, which is quite expensive.

  • Cost: $150
  • Connection: 3.5mm, Bluetooth
  • Payment Types Supported: Magstripe, EMV, NFC/Contactless

SumUp

SumUp (read our review) is a European company that opened up processing for US merchants in 2017. While it’s not as comprehensive as other mPOS options, it does everything most merchants will need to do. It’s also worth pointing out that the SumUp mobile card reader, called the SumUp Air, actually won an award for its innovative design.

The SumUp Air shows its European sophistication with its sleek white minimalist design. It relies on a Bluetooth connection to process magstripe, EMV, and contactless transactions. If you want more information, check out our unboxing review of the SumUp card reader.

  • Cost: $69
  • Connection: Bluetooth
  • Payment Types Supported: Magstripe, EMV, NFC/Contactless

Clover Go

Clover Go (read our review) is the mobile extension to the Clover family of POS products developed by First Data. It functions best as an extension of Clover, but it can be a standalone POS option. However, pricing for the hardware as well as payment processing can vary significantly depending on which reseller you go through, and you should be wary of sales gimmicks and possible contracts with early termination fees.  However, don’t forget that anyone selling Clover products is just reselling First Data’s processing services.

Clover Go Reader 

Clover’s basic “entry level” reader is a headphone jack reader that supports magstripe and EMV transactions. The design is overall larger than most comparable devices, but Clover does include a clamp to help stabilize the card reader while attached to a phone or tablet.

Pricing for the Clover Go reader will depend on resellers. Some may even offer it for free. Unlike its all-in-one sibling, you can’t get this reader through the Apple Store and if you sign up with First Data directly you’ll probably be offered the All-In-One Reader first and foremost.

  • Cost: Varies according to reseller
  • Connection: 3.5mm
  • Payment Types Supported: Magstripe, EMV

Clover All-In-One Reader

I said earlier that the PayPal Chip and Tap Reader reminded me of Clover Go. That’s because Clover Go is also a square, boxy device with very similar dimensions. However, whereas PayPal’s is black, Clover Go’s is white.

You’ll also find the All-In-One Reader comes with a dock. It’s not the most elegant design, but it will allow you to charge the device or keep it on a countertop while still processing card transactions.

Unfortunately, pricing for this card reader varies depending on which company a merchant chooses to sign up with. You can get it direct from First Data (or the Apple Store) for $39.95, not counting the dock, which sells for $34.  

  • Cost: $39.95 (through First Data or Apple Store; other prices vary according to reseller)
  • Connection: Bluetooth
  • Payment Types Supported: Magstripe, EMV, NFC/Contactless

Intuit/QuickBooks GoPayment

Intuit’s mobile payment solution, QuickBooks GoPayment (read our review) appeals mostly to a small but viable niche — QuickBooks Online customers who need an easy way to take payments in person. While the app isn’t loaded with advanced features, it will work pretty well for merchants with simple needs. Intuit offers two readers to address merchant needs.

Chip and Magstripe Reader

Intuit’s Chip and Magstripe reader is a small, gray, unassuming device. It doesn’t have quite the sophistication of some other readers (I might even call it bland), but the design is overall good. The curves have a sort of friendliness about them rather and prevent it from looking boxy like other devices. As the name implies, this card reader supports magstripe and EMV transactions. It connects to a phone or tablet via Bluetooth.

The Chip and Magstripe Reader goes for $19 normally, but Intuit is offering the reader free for new merchants. That puts it at the lower price end, especially for a Bluetooth enabled device with EMV. You can also connect the device to computers running QuickBooks Desktop Pro 2018 and future versions of the software.

  • Cost: $19 (free with signup for new merchants)
  • Connection: Bluetooth
  • Payment Types Supported: Magstripe, EMV

All-In-One Card Reader

Intuit’s newer card reader is an all-in-one device that connects via Bluetooth. But unlike its sibling, this device supports magstripe, chip card, and contactless transactions. By default, it’s meant to nest in a charging dock.

Intuit sells the all-in-one reader for $49, which is not a bad price at all considering that the dock/cradle is included at no extra charge. It has the same sort of nondescript gray finish, but Intuit has embraced a curvy aesthetic that is easy on the eyes.

  • Cost: $49 (including dock)
  • Connection: Bluetooth
  • Payment Types Supported: Magstripe, EMV, NFC/Contactless

PayAnywhere

Last on the list is PayAnywhere (read our review). While the name isn’t as recognizable as some of the alternatives, PayAnywhere’s mPOS does have some good features and interesting hardware. Its biggest shortcoming is simply the quality of customer service and some practices involving its Storefront plan.

PayAnywhere offers merchants a choice of two readers for merchants, though they still leave me a bit perplexed in terms of design.

PayAnywhere 2-In-1 Reader

PayAnywhere’s entry-level reader is a 2-in-1 device with magstripe and EMV support and Bluetooth connectivity. It looks pretty simple, and it actually reminds me of PayPal’s Chip and Tap reader with its shape and coloring.

There’s not much more to say about this little device except that PayAnywhere offers it free for new merchants. Additional 2-in-1 readers run for $30.

  • Cost: $29.95 (free for new merchants)
  • Connection: Bluetooth
  • Payment Types Supported: Magstripe, EMV

PayAnywhere 3-In-1 Reader

I think the most interesting thing about PayAnywhere’s 3-In-1 Reader is that it’s the only mobile card reader I’ve seen that supports NFC and connects via a headphone jack. (The Ingenico RP457c can connect via headphone jack OR Bluetooth, so I don’t count it in the same category.) It looks shiny and futuristic with its black finish and lights, which is ironic for a device that uses a dying connection method.

PayAnywhere offers its 3-in-1 device for $40, but on the website you’ll also see an offer for free processing on your first $5,000 in Apple Pay transactions (valued at $135). However, an offer like that should not be the deciding factor in choosing a processor.

  • Cost: $39.95
  • Connection: 3.5mm
  • Payment Types Supported: Magstripe, EMV, NFC/Contactless

Is a Mobile Credit Card Reader Absolutely Necessary?

You don’t actually have to have a mobile credit card reader to process payments with a mobile POS system.

Flint Mobile, a mobile processor that works through Stripe, has no credit card readers at all. Instead, the app relies on a device’s camera to scan cards. The camera doesn’t actually snap a photo of the card, which would be a huge security issue. But the app is able to open the camera and scan a card the same way QR code readers are able to access the camera to open QR code links. Flint has a couple of filters it applies to the camera for added security.

That said, Flint isn’t the only mobile option with this ability. PayPal Here and Intuit GoPayment also include the camera scanning feature.

Not only that, but most mPOS apps also include a feature that allows you to manually key in transactions. These process at a higher rate that swiped/dipped/tapped transactions because they’re processed as card-not-present, like ecommerce transactions. But it’s a useful alternative when the card reader is being glitchy or the card is very worn. The notable exception to all this is SumUp, a company that started in Europe and doesn’t support manual entry for cards except through its virtual terminal.

Of course, if you don’t want to pay extra for manually entering transactions, it might be best to spend a little extra money and buy a backup card reader or two in case one starts to misbehave.

Are Free Credit Card Readers Worth It?

Several mobile POS options (including Square) provide an incentive for potential customers in the form of a free credit card reader. This can certainly make it more tempting to try out a payment processing service, but it shouldn’t be the deciding factor.

For one, free card readers tend to be pretty basic. Some have EMV support, but none of the free card readers on this list support contactless payments. Contactless support may not be mandatory for everyone, but EMV support should be a mandatory feature for every merchant. A reader with a Bluetooth connection will also ensure it’s future-proof no matter what phone or tablet you upgrade to later on.

Two, a free mobile card reader will absolutely not offset a processor’s shortcomings, such as poor customer service or missing features. It’s smarter for merchants to make a decision based on the quality of the mobile app, its features, and the processor’s customer support.

So while the ability to try some mPOS options without any upfront investment is nice, please don’t let a free credit card reader be the reason you pick one processor over another. Make sure you explore all of your options.

Don’t let a free reader be the determining factor in choosing an mPOS.

Final Thoughts

I’m not going to try and convince you that mobile credit card readers are the world’s most fascinating subject (even if I could probably talk your ear off for a couple of hours about all the different designs and features and how they embody the philosophies of the companies that sell them).

But if nothing else, you should take away a few key ideas that will prepare you to choose a mobile point of sale app and a credit card reader:

  • Software is more important than the hardware. Make sure the app has what features you need before you set your heart on a device.
  • Make sure the card reader you choose has EMV support. In 2018, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t be taking such a basic step to protect yourself and your business.
  • Prices for credit card readers range from totally free to upwards of $75. How much you want to spend is entirely up to you, but you will generally pay more for Bluetooth connectivity and for NFC support. Don’t be suckered in by the offer of a free reader, because there are lots of other criteria you should consider first.
  • You don’t technically need a mobile reader to take payments on a phone or tablet. However, you will pay more to process manually entered transactions in your mPOS app, so it’s a good idea to get one anyway.

Thanks for reading! If you’re ready to choose an mPOS app, a great place to start is our mobile processing comparison chart! Otherwise, if you have questions, feel free to leave us a comment!

The post The Best Credit Card Reader For Your Small Business appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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What Is A Merchant Services Provider?

What is a merchant services provider?

If you’ve just started your own business or you’re looking to add credit and debit cards as payment methods, you’re going to be bombarded by a bewildering variety of new terms and concepts that you’ve never encountered before. One very basic term you’ll want to familiarize yourself with is the type of business entity known as a merchant services provider.

To understand what a merchant services provider is and what it can do for your business, you’ll first need to understand the concept of merchant services. This term describes the range of services and hardware and software products that allow merchants to accept and process credit or debit card transactions. Before the internet came along, things were pretty simple. Merchant services consisted of countertop terminals to input card payments, processing services to approve the transaction, and merchant accounts to deposit the money in after the sale. Today, it’s a much more complicated landscape, with eCommerce opening up far more opportunities for selling products remotely than just mail and telephone ordering. Software products such as payment gateways allow customers to pay for purchases directly over the internet, while inventory management and online reporting services give you the power to track virtually every aspect of your business on your computer.

Merchant services providers are sometimes also referred to as acquirers, processors, or merchant account providers. Here at Merchant Maverick, we use the term merchant services providers as a catch-all to cover entities such as merchant account providers, payment services providers (PSPs), payment gateway providers, and any other type of business that allows you to accept payment methods other than cash or paper checks.

Types of Merchant Services Providers

Not all merchant services providers offer the same features, but most fall into one of several categories that help to differentiate them a little from their competitors. The most common types of merchant services providers include the following:

Merchant Account Providers

These entities are the most commonly encountered merchant services providers. A merchant account provider can, at a minimum, provide you with a merchant account and processing services to ensure that you receive your money when a customer pays by credit or debit card. While all merchant account providers can set you up with a merchant account, only a few of the largest companies can also offer processing services to process your transactions. These companies are called direct processors, and include industry leaders such as First Data (see our review), Elavon (see our review), and TSYS Merchant Solutions (see our review). Most other merchant account providers rely on one of these direct processors to process their merchants’ transactions.

Payment Services Providers (PSPs)

While having a merchant account is a good idea for all but the smallest of businesses, you don’t absolutely need one to accept credit or debit card payments. A payment services provider (PSP), such as Square (see our review) or PayPal (see our review) can give your business the ability to accept these kinds of payment methods without a dedicated merchant account. Instead, your account will be aggregated with those of other merchants, and you won’t have a unique merchant ID number. This arrangement has the advantage of virtually eliminating the account fees and lengthy contract terms that often come with a traditional merchant account. However, these accounts are more prone to being frozen or terminated without notice, and customer service options aren’t as robust as they are with a full-service merchant account. PSPs are an excellent choice for businesses that only process a few thousand dollars a month in credit/debit card transactions or only operate on a seasonal basis.

Payment Gateway Providers

With the advent of eCommerce, a new kind of provider has come on the scene: the payment gateway provider. These companies can offer you a payment gateway, which you’ll need to accept online payments. However, they may or may not also offer you a merchant account to go with it. Authorize.Net (see our review), one of the largest and oldest gateway providers, gives you a choice between one of their merchant accounts or using their gateway with your existing merchant account. Other providers, such as PayTrace (see our review), offer a gateway-only service. You’ll have to get your own merchant account from a third-party provider.

Types of Merchant Services

Most merchant services providers offer a wide variety of products and services to allow merchants to accept credit and debit card payments, as well as manage their inventory and track other aspects of their business. Your needs as a merchant will depend on the nature and type of your business. While all businesses will need either a merchant account or a payment service account (if you’re signed up with a PSP), other features will only be useful for certain types of businesses. For example, if your business doesn’t sell anything online, you won’t need a payment gateway. Here’s a brief overview of the most common types of merchant services:

Merchant Accounts

Every business that wants to accept credit or debit cards as a form of payment will need a merchant account. While most merchant account providers offer full-service merchant accounts, those from PSPs like Square (see our review) lack a unique merchant ID number. Merchant ID numbers make your business easier to properly identify to payment processing systems, giving you some protection from fraud and adding stability to your account. A merchant account is simply an account where funds from processed transactions are deposited. Those funds are then transferred by your provider into a business account that you specify, such as a business checking account.

Credit Card Terminals

Retail merchants will also need a hardware product that can read your customers’ credit and debit cards and then transmit that information to your provider’s processing network. Traditional countertop terminals such as the Verifone Vx520 can connect to processing networks via either an Ethernet connection or a landline. Wireless models are also available, but they tend to be bulkier and more expensive than wired models, and require a wireless data plan (usually around $20.00 per month) to operate.

Terminals may be purchased outright or leased from your merchant services provider. Because most providers support the same terminals, we recommend either buying your terminal directly from your provider or purchasing it from a third-party supplier. Terminals require a software load which must be installed before they can accept transactions. If you buy your terminal from a third-party source, you’ll need to have it re-programmed to install this software. We strongly discourage terminal leasing due to the noncancelable nature of the leases and the fact that you’ll pay several times more than the value of the terminal over the lifetime of the lease.

In shopping for a terminal, you should select an EMV-compliant model as a minimum. Support for NFC-based payment methods (such as Apple Pay and Google Pay) is also a good choice as these methods are becoming more popular among customers.

Point of Sale (POS) Systems

POS systems combine the functions of a credit card terminal with a large computer display, enabling you to manage inventory and monitor your sales through a single piece of equipment. These systems include fully-featured, dedicated terminals and tablet-based software options that can run on an iPad or Android tablet. Many providers offer optional accessories such as tablet mounts, cash drawers, and check scanners, allowing you to accept any form of payment through a single device.

Mobile Payment (mPOS) Systems

These systems allow you to use your smartphone or tablet as a credit card terminal. mPOS systems consist of a mobile card reader that connects to your mobile device and an app to communicate with your provider’s processing network. While Square (see our review) was the first provider to offer a simple mPOS system, most providers now offer similar products. Although they’re difficult to find and cost more than simple magstripe-only readers, we recommend selecting a card reader with EMV compatibility and a Bluetooth connection (rather than the traditional headphone jack plug) to future-proof your system.

Payment Gateway

A payment gateway is simply software that communicates between your website and your provider’s processing networks, allowing you to accept payments over the internet. Because not all merchants need a gateway, providers usually charge a monthly gateway fee (around $25.00) to access this feature. Most gateways include support for recurring billing, a customer information management database, and security features such as encryption or tokenization to protect your customers’ data.

Virtual Terminal

A virtual terminal is another software product that turns your computer into a credit card terminal. Transactions can be entered manually or swiped using an optional USB-connected card reader. Virtual terminals are most commonly used by mail order/telephone order businesses that don’t have an eCommerce website.

Online Shopping Carts

Shopping cart software is designed for eCommerce merchants who need a more specialized shopping experience or want to customize the features of their website. Shopify (see our review) is one of the most popular online shopping carts. Check compatibility with your merchant services provider before selecting an online cart.

eCheck (ACH) Processing

eCheck processing is an optional feature offered by most merchant service providers. It allows you to scan paper checks and instantly confirm that funds are available to cover the purchase. This service protects you from fraud and saves you a trip to the bank.

Merchant Cash Advances and Small Business Loans

Merchant cash advances and small business loans provide another way for your business to receive funds when you need them, and most merchant services providers offer them. Check out our Merchant’s Guide to Short-Term Loans for more information.

Final Thoughts

Which specific merchant services you need will depend on the nature of your business. Retail-only businesses won’t need a payment gateway, but they will need reliable credit card terminals. eCommerce businesses can’t function without a payment gateway, but do not require terminals. Of course, if your business operates in both the retail and eCommerce sector (which is becoming more common), you’ll need just about every service your provider has to offer.

Every merchant service provider has their own unique combination of products and services, so you’ll want to ensure that a provider offers the features that you need before you sign up. Many of these services are proprietary, meaning they’ll only work with the provider that offers them. While this helps to ensure compatibility between different products, it also means you won’t be able to take your favorite product with you if you switch providers. This is more of a factor in the eCommerce sector, where payment gateways are often proprietary products. For an overview of our highest-rated merchant services providers, check out our Merchant Account Comparison Chart.

The post What Is A Merchant Services Provider? appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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Gym Equipment Financing: Is It Better To Rent Or Buy Fitness Equipment?

Gym Equipment Financing: Should You Rent Or Buy Fitness Equipment

Without weight machines, treadmills, exercise bikes, and barbells, your gym or fitness center is just a big, open room with a bunch of rubber mats. While there’s nothing wrong with calisthenics, you’ll probably want to lure in your fitness fanatics with some exercise equipment.

That leaves you with the question of whether to rent gym equipment, rent to own workout equipment, or buy gym equipment.

Below, we’ll look at some of the ways you can approach gym equipment financing.

Advantages Of Buying Gym Equipment

The cheapest way to own equipment — without considering external factors — is to buy it. Once you’ve purchased equipment, it’s yours for as long as you want it or as long as it lasts, whichever comes first. Ideally, pieces of equipment that you buy outright will last a long time with minimal maintenance.

Generally speaking, the less complex the item and the fewer the moving parts, the more sense it makes to buy it. For example, there’re only a few things that can go wrong with a dumbbell, and it’s unlikely to be obsolete years down the road.

Ways To Buy Equipment

If you want to completely avoid interest payments, you’ll have to buy gym equipment out of pocket. Of course, that requires that you have healthy working capital and a large amount of cash on hand.

Everyone else is looking at financing their equipment through a loan or a type of lease called an equipment finance agreement (or more broadly, a capital lease).

An equipment loan typically covers about 80% of the cost of your equipment. Like other term loans, it will accrue interest over time, so expect to pay more in aggregate the longer your loan lasts. Typically, the equipment you’re buying serves as collateral for the loan, although you may also be asked to give a personal guarantee or put up additional collateral.

If you don’t have the credit or capital to secure an equipment loan, you may want to look at an equipment finance agreement. While leases are generally thought of as a type of rental, this type of lease will transfer ownership to the lessee (you) either immediately or over the course of the lease. Most capital leases have small residuals (the remaining amount that you have to pay to formally own the item at the end of the lease), sometimes as little as $1, which means you can expect to pay the vast majority of the equipment’s cost (plus interest) over the course of the lease.

Generally speaking, loans are less costly than leases, but harder to qualify for. Leases, which can be offered by either a third party or a captive lessor, will usually cover the full cost of the item. Some lessors will even cover shipping expenses.

Advantages Of Renting Gym Equipment

It’s nice to own your equipment, but sometimes it’s not your best option.

Exercise fads come and go. The cutting-edge machines of several years ago may be obsolete hunks of metal now. Further, they may require more maintenance than they’re worth.

Do you want the option to easily return and upgrade? Would you like to be able to write your monthly payments off as operating expenses? If so, you may want to consider renting or equipment leasing.

Ways To Rent Equipment

Renting commercial gym equipment usually means getting an operating lease. Typically, this type of lease allows the lessor to retain formal ownership of the equipment while you are granted permission to use it for the life of the lease. Depending on the agreement, either you or the lessor may be responsible for upkeep and repairs.

Compared to capital leases, operating leases typically have lower monthly payments but a significantly higher residual. While you do often still have the option to buy the equipment at the end of the lease (usually for fair market value), you’ll generally return the equipment at the end of your term.

Note that not all operating leases are eligible to be written off as operating expenses. If your financial strategy depends on this, make sure to discuss the any prospective lease with your lessor and your financial advisor.

The Cost Of Financing Gym Equipment

In addition to the ticket price of your gym equipment, expect to incur some additional charges depending on the type of financing you go with.

Here are some of the more common costs to expect:

  • Interest: This is (usually) the APR of the loan or lease, although some lenders may use a flat rate instead. In either case, the longer your term length, the more money you’ll be spending on the item.
  • Origination Fee: This is a closing fee some lenders charge in addition to interest. It’s either a percentage of the amount you’re borrowing (1% – 5% is typical) or a flat fee. This fee is more common with loans than leases.
  • Administration Fee: This is a fee charged in addition to interest to maintain your account. It may be a percentage or a flat fee. It’s more common with leases than loans.
  • Downpayment: A payment you’re expected to make at the time of closing. This is either the portion of the cost that an equipment loan didn’t cover or, in the case of leases, the first (and sometimes last) month’s payment.
  • Residual: This is the amount of money you’d owe if you were to purchase the equipment at the end of the lease. In the case of capital leases, the residual may be a trivial formality ($1, for example). In the case of operating leases, it may be substantially higher, typically the fair market value of the asset.
  • Shipping: Depending on the type of financing you select, this may or may not be covered by your lease. Loans rarely account for shipping expenses.

Third Party Financers

If your equipment vendor has a captive lessor, they may offer deals especially suited to gyms. That said, don’t assume they offer you the best rates. Your local bank or credit union may offer competitive financing, especially if you have an established relationship with them — and don’t have bad credit.

You can also seek financing through online lessors. Here are some that finance gym equipment.

eLease

Types of Leases:
• $1 buyout; FMV; equipment finance agreement (EFA)
Visit the eLease website

Read our review

eLease finances gym equipment through one of three types of leases. In addition to normal interest rates, expect to pay an administrative fee, as well as your first and last month’s payment as a downpayment.

National Funding 

 

Types of Leases:
• Capital leases
Visit the National Funding website

Read our review

National Funding primarily deals in term loans and merchant cash advances, but they also offer capital leases to gyms looking to own their exercise agreement.

Final Thoughts

Whether you choose to rent or buy gym equipment for your fitness center, you’ll have numerous financing options. Remember to consider the life cycle of the pieces you’re buying (and the impact sweaty bodies pumping out reps will have on them) to decide whether it’s worth building equity in items.

Looking for more equipment financing options? Check out our equipment financing comparisons and reviews.

The post Gym Equipment Financing: Is It Better To Rent Or Buy Fitness Equipment? appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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The 5 Best Fora Financial Alternatives For Business Funding

fora financial logo

Fora Financial (read our review) is one of the more reliable online lenders in the business. While they don’t necessarily excel in any one area, they do provide short-term loans and merchant cash advances at fairly reasonable (for the industry) rates and are willing to work with new businesses. If Fora doesn’t sound like your cup of tea, what other options are available?

Here are some business funding alternatives to Fora Financial.

Square Capital

Best for…

Square customers looking for small loans with low rates

Requirements

Time in business: N/A
Credit score: N/A
Revenue: $10K/yr

Square (read our review) isn’t primarily known for loans, but they do offer some of their point of sale hardware customers loans ranging in size from $500 to $100,000.

These loans come at lower rates (1.1 – 1.16) than you’ll probably get from Fora, and Square’s payment processing infrastructure makes it easy to set up the automated repayment process. If you’re looking for convenience and don’t mind your payment services company also being your lender, it’s a pretty good deal.

How To Apply For A Square Capital Loan

Unfortunately, the process for determining who is eligible for a Square Capital loan is a bit opaque. Rather than apply at your leisure, Square will, at their leisure, send email notifications to qualifying customers. That means that you may not qualify for funding through Square Capital when you need it.

If you do receive an offer, the process is extremely easy. You decide how much you want from the options offered, then Square will use the information they already have on file to process your application. In some cases they may ask for additional documents.

Takeaway

It’s best to consider Square Capital as a perk that comes with being a Square customer.

Credibly

 

Best for…

New businesses looking for a transparent lender

Requirements

Time in business: 6 months
Credit score: 500
Revenue: $15K/yr + avg. daily balance over $1K for expansion loans

It can be hard for new businesses to get funding right out of the gate. One of the nice things about Fora is that they’re willing to work with businesses that have been around for only three months.

Credibly (read our review) isn’t quite so lenient, but they are willing to work with businesses that have only been in business for six months. Like Fora, Credibly offers some variety in their financial products, although they’re more focused on installment loans than merchant cash advances. Expect slightly more stringent lending guidelines than you will find with Fora.

One nice aspect of Credibly is that they’re more transparent than most of their competitors, making it a little easier to know what you’re getting into. Credibly’s rates are comparable to Fora’s, falling between 1.09 and 1.36.

How To Apply For A Credibly Loan

You can begin your Credibly application online on their website. This is essentially a screening process. If you make the cut, you’ll be contacted by a representative who will prompt you to provide the following information:

  • Business lease or mortgage agreement
  • Picture ID of all owners
  • Business tax returns
  • Bank statements for the last three months
  • Basic personal information including Social Security number

Takeaway

Credibly’s easy qualifications and above-average transparency make it a decent choice for new businesses without a lot of options.

Breakout Capital

 

breakout capital

Best for…

Businesses looking for a flexible funder

Requirements

Time in business: 1 yr / NA(invoice factoring)
Credit score: 600/ NA (invoice factoring)
Revenue: $10K/month / NA (invoice factoring)

Breakout Capital (read our review) offers a number of short-term funding solutions for new businesses. In fact, flexibility is one of their biggest draws.

Breakout’s loans operate on a principle similar to a line of credit, making it easy to tap additional funding in the future without racking up punishing fees or double-dipping. While Breakout’s rates are still on the high side — as are those of most online lenders — the company takes pains not to pull too many unexpected fees or terms of service changes.

They also offer a niche form of financing that can be useful to businesses that want to borrow against their unpaid invoices. Invoice factoring allows businesses to sell unpaid invoices to a lender at a discount. Rather than owing interest, you’ll sign over your invoices to Breakout, who will then advance you a percentage of the invoice’s worth. The advantage here is that you can bypass credit checks and similar prerequisites. You just need to have invoices to sell. Note that Breakout doesn’t provide invoice factoring in-house, but rather partners with invoice factoring companies to offer the service.

How To Apply For A Breakout Capital Loan

You can fill out a truncated application at Breakout Capital’s website, or bypass that part and contact them by phone. Expect to have to provide documents that establish your identity, your business’s details, and your revenue. Breakout will then determine which of their products you qualify for.

Takeaway

Breakout is a great option for businesses that need flexible lending. Both their lines of credit and invoice factoring give you control over when and if you want to tap your credit resources. This freedom comes at a premium, however.

Street Shares

 

Best for…

Profitable businesses with decent credit, businesses looking for a line of credit

Requirements

Time in business: 1 year, some exemptions for 6 months
Credit score: 620
Revenue: $100K (for 6 month consideration)

Street Shares (read our review) may sound like an arcade game, but they’re actually among the more conservative online lenders, offering installment loans and lines of credit.

The credit requirements here are a bit higher than many of their competitors, but businesses with good credit can take advantage of Street Shares’ lower rates and weekly (rather than daily) repayment process.

Profitable companies should take special notice as Street Shares will work with companies that are less than a year old, provided they’ve earned $100,000 in revenue at the time of application.

Street Shares charges interest just like a bank loan. You’re looking at APRs between 7 – 39.99%.

How To Apply For A Street Shares Loan

Like most online lenders, Street Shares lets you begin your application on their website. There you can submit some basic information about yourself, your business, and the financial products you’re interested in.

If you’re approved, you’ll be contacted by a representative and asked to provide additional information. The documents will vary depending on the product (if you’re provided with multiple loan offers, you can decide between them).

Takeaway

Street Shares is a little harder to qualify for than some of the other options here, but their competitive rates and the flexibility of their products make them a good choice for businesses that can make the cut.

BlueVine

 

bluevine logo

Best for…

New companies needing a flexible lending plan

Requirements

Time in business: 3 – 6 months
Credit score: 530 – 600
Revenue: N/A

BlueVine (read our review) operates in a similar niche to Breakout capitals, offering both lines of credit and invoice factoring. Note above that the lower “time in business” and “credit score” requirement ranges are for invoice factoring, while the higher ones are for lines of credit. The line of credit product isn’t available to businesses based in Kentucky, Tennessee, Nevada, Vermont, New Hampshire, or either of the Dakotas.

BlueVine only assesses a fee (1.5%) on their lines of credit when you draw upon them, but you’ll want to make sure you pay them off quickly. Interest accumulates weekly at a rate of 0.3% to 1.5% (this is not an APR).

BlueVine does their invoice factoring in-house. If you choose to use this service, they’ll set up an account that will receive your invoice payments from B2B transactions. When you receive an invoice, you can then decide whether or not you want an advance on it. If you choose to, Bluevine will advance you between 85% – 90% of its value. When the invoice is paid, you’ll get a rebate on the remaining amount, minus any accumulated fees.

How To Apply For A BlueVine Loan

You can begin the application on BlueVine’s website by creating an account and answering some questions about your business. You’ll then have to provide read-only access to your bank account or three months worth of bank statements. You can create invoices in BlueVine’s interface or connect your QuickBooks, Xero, or FreshBooks account.

In addition to the usual information like income and creditworthiness, BlueVine also considers your transaction volume and advertising strategy.

Takeaway

New businesses that haven’t had much time to establish themselves, but have good fundamentals, can find a lot of flexibility with BlueVine.

Final Thoughts

Alternative lending is a highly competitive market with a huge number of options for businesses looking for non-traditional sources of funding. Finding a lender that will meet your needs at a reasonable rate can take some work, but it’s worth the effort.

Need more information? Check out our small business loan comparison.

The post The 5 Best Fora Financial Alternatives For Business Funding appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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8 Ways To Finance Your Small Business

Business financing is often a necessary part of growing a business, but when it comes to finding capital, it can be difficult to know where to start. Should you get a credit card? What about a loan from your local bank? Is there useful financing out there that you haven’t even heard of?

Read on, and we’ll point you in the right direction. This article discusses the most common (and some less common) ways of getting financing for your business. And, if you find the right type of financing for your business, we’ll give you the next steps to continue your search.

Want help finding a business loan? Apply now to Merchant Maverick’s Community of Lenders. We’ve partnered with banks, credit unions, and other financiers across the country to bring you fast and easy business financing.

1. Business Loans

As you might expect, business loans are one of the most popular and versatile ways of financing your business. Most businesses will qualify for a business loan of one sort or another, and they can be used for many business purposes, from working capital to business expansion to refinancing.

Business loans come from many different places. While everybody knows that you can get a business loan from a bank, you might not be aware that other financial institutions offer business loans. Many offer loans that are easier to qualify for and have faster applications than bank loans. Here are places that commonly offer business loans:

  • Banks and credit unions offer business loans and other types of financing.
  • Nonprofits, not-for-profit institutions, and microlenders offer small business loans and other types of financing to create jobs and fuel community growth.
  • The Small Business Administration partners with financial institutions to offer business loans. Read more about SBA loans in our guide to their programs.
  • Online lenders, also called “alternative lenders,” offer business loans and other types of financing with fast, semi- or fully-automated application processes.

Loans come in many different forms. The most common are installment loans, in which the money is granted to the business in one lump sum and then repaid via incremental, fixed, payments. However, some loans might have special fee and repayment structures — you might find loans with fixed fees (like short-term loans), loans that have repayment rates based on the percentage of money you make every day or month, or other arrangements. In other words, with a little looking, most merchants will be able to find something that is suited to the needs of their business.

For more information on small business loans, check out our free Beginner’s Guide to Small Business Loans. Or, to read reviews of individual lenders, head over to our small business loans review category.

2. Business Lines Of Credit

Business lines of credit are a sort of hybrid between business loans and credit cards. Like business loans, with a line of credit, you can borrow a sum of money which is (normally) repaid along with interest in installments over a set period of time. Like credit cards, you can request funds at any time, up to your available credit limit.

If you occasionally need funds to make ends meet or grow your business, or you simply want a safety net in case of emergencies, a line of credit is an excellent tool at your disposal.

Credit lines can be especially useful to businesses on a timeline because you don’t need to apply every time you need to borrow funds. When you are approved for a credit line, you’re granted access to a certain amount of money from which you can draw at any time. If you have a revolving line of credit, the amount you can borrow will replenish as you repay outstanding debts.

Some credit lines, such as asset-backed lines of credit, can work a little differently. If you have access to a credit line secured by unpaid invoices, inventory, or other assets, the amount you can draw at any given time will depend on the value of the assets you have outstanding. These credit lines are normally best for B2B businesses.

Credit lines carry a few drawbacks — most credit lines have variable interest rates, which mean that your rates might change without notice. And, if you aren’t very good at managing money, you might find that you don’t have emergency funds when you need them. However, lines of credit are useful tools for many businesses.

In the past, it was difficult for all but the most well-established and prosperous businesses to get credit lines. With the advent of online loans, it’s becoming easier for businesses of all sizes to access this useful financing tool. Check out our guide to business lines of credit for more information, or, if you’re interested in procuring one, take a look at our favorite line of credit services.

3. Business Credit Cards

There are many reasons to get a business credit card for your business.

For starters, most credit card issuers offer rewards and benefits to merchants who have signed on with their services. By using the card, you could be earning savings in the form of cash back points (that can be redeemed for travel or other expenses). These rewards add up in the long run, and you might be able to save your business quite a bit of money. Additionally, many credit card issuers offer benefits to cardholders, such as extended warranty, price protection, roadside assistance, and other perks.

Credit cards are also convenient ways to keep track of expenses and smooth out cash flow. If you put all your purchases on your credit card, you can easily see what you’ve been spending money on and where you might be able to cut costs. Because the money isn’t coming out of your own account right away, you can defer payments until a more convenient date. You don’t have to struggle to come up with money for expenses if you don’t have it at the moment, or it would be more convenient to pay later.

Of course, credit cards do have some downsides: the APRs can be expensive, so if you don’t pay your bills in time you could wind up with hefty fees that can be difficult to pay off. Additionally, some credit cards carry extra fees, like annual fees and balance transfer fees, which could eat into the money you save by using the card in the first place. However, if you are good at managing money, and spend time choosing a card that will maximize your savings based on how much you plan to utilize the card, credit cards can be excellent tools for many businesses.

Interested in getting a business credit card? Check out a list of our favorite business credit cards. Or, if you are starting a business, you might be interested in our favorite personal credit cards that can be used for business.

4. Merchant Cash Advances

If you need a one-time amount of funds, it might be worth considering a merchant cash advance. This type of financing can be useful for B2C businesses with strong daily sales.

In practice, merchant cash advances are similar to business loans, with the exception of how they’re repaid. Cash advances are repaid by deducting a small percentage of your daily sales; the amount you are repaying each day will vary along with your cash flow. These financial products don’t have a set repayment date, but are normally repaid in a year or less.

Merchant cash advances are an excellent tool for B2C businesses that need a small infusion of cash for working capital, business growth, or other reasons. Know, however, that cash advances have a few downsides: they can be very expensive, and the cost might not be immediately apparent because the fee structure is different than a traditional loan. Instead of interest, cash advance fees are calculated using a factor rate, which can obscure the true cost of the advance.

Head over to our comprehensive article on merchant cash advances for more information, or take a look at our reviews of merchant cash advance providers if you’re interested in finding an advance.

5. Personal Loans

While business loans are based on the credibility and strength of your business, personal loans are based on your personal creditworthiness and financial health. For this reason, these loans can be useful for entrepreneurs, startups, and other businesses that don’t yet have a credit history. You’ll want to give this option a pass if you have separated your business and personal finances, but if you’re not there yet, a personal loan can help you get your business up and going.

Personal loans are normally available from banks, credit unions, and online lenders. You’ll have to have a steady source of income, a solid debt-to-income ratio, and fair credit to qualify for reasonable rates.

Take a look at our guide to personal loans for business for more information, or check out our startup business loan reviews for reviews on personal lenders.

6. Crowdfunding

Rising to prominence due to the internet and some changes in legislature, crowdfunding allows you to finance your business via a network of your peers.

Crowdfunding is normally used by entrepreneurs to get a startup off the ground, or by creators who need money to fund a product. In a crowdfunding arrangement, the entrepreneur creates a campaign, which usually includes a description of their business or product, information about the founders and their partners, a rough timeline, potential problems, and other frequently asked questions.

Perhaps the most well-known type of crowdfunding, popularized by services such as Kickstarter (read our review) and Indiegogo (read our review), is rewards crowdfunding. You may not be aware that there are actually quite a few different type of crowdfunding available:

  • Rewards crowdfunding, from services like Kickstarter and Indiegogo, allows contributors to receive products in exchange for backing the business or project.
  • Donation crowdfunding, on sites like Razoo (read our review), involves funds that are donated to your cause. This type of crowdfunding is typically only used for nonprofits or other charitable projects.
  • Debt crowdfunding, from services such as Kiva U.S. (read our review), works similarly to a business loan — backers contribute money with the expectation that it will be paid back, normally with interest.
  • Equity crowdfunding, from company’s like Fundable (read our review), works when backers contribute money in exchange for equity in your business.

Between all the different types available, most entrepreneurs should be able to find a type of crowdfunding that will suit their business or project. Some less-than-sexy businesses, however, might find that they have trouble appealing to casual investors. While debt and equity crowdfunding — which tends to attract more serious backers — might solve that problem, some businesses might still need to look at other financing options.

Crowdfunding also tends to take a long time. Typically, the entrepreneur has to create a campaign and enter into a one- to three-month funding period. The funding period might require a fair amount of marketing, networking, communicating with current and potential backers, and other work to get your project funded.

Interested in crowdfunding? Head over to our startup business loans review category to read reviews of crowdfunding services.

7. Invoice Factoring

Invoice factoring is a financial solution for B2B businesses that invoice their customers. If you have cash flow struggles due to slow-paying customers, invoice factoring is a potential solution. Factoring is commonly used in industries such as construction, manufacturing, printing, and other B2B businesses.

Invoice factors purchase your unpaid invoices at a discount. While you’ll have to take a bit of a loss, invoice factoring can get you the money you need, when you need it, to keep your business going.

When you sell an invoice to a factoring company, you will receive most of the money up-front, and the factor will place a small amount on reserve. Then, when your customer pays the invoice, the funds are diverted to the factoring company, and you will receive the rest of the money in the reserve, minus the invoice factor’s fee.

There are many invoice factoring arrangements, depending on the factoring company and the needs of your business. You can find factors that require you to sell a lot of invoices or ones that let you pick and choose more carefully. Some factors require that your customers know about the arrangement, while others will keep it a secret, and so on.

Invoice factoring has gotten a bad rap in the past because some factoring companies employed poor practices, such as failing to disclose extra fees, requiring long-term contracts and monthly minimums, and other reasons. However, if you do your due diligence, you will be able to find an invoice factor that suits your business’s needs without employing poor tactics. Check out our Basic Introduction To Invoice Factoring to learn what to look for, and take a look at our comprehensive invoice factoring reviews to learn about individual factors.

8. Equipment Financing

If you run a business that relies on computers, manufacturing equipment, restaurant equipment, vehicles, or other equipment that might be difficult to pay for out of your business’s own pocket, equipment financing might be right for you.

Equipment financing covers two types of financing: equipment loans and equipment leases.

Equipment loans are similar to traditional business loans, but the equipment is generally used as collateral. In a typical equipment loan arrangement, the lender will cover 80% to 90% of the equipment, and you will be responsible for paying the other 10% to 20%.

Equipment leases are arrangements in which you rent the equipment for a certain period of time. In practice, some lease arrangements are similar to loans, because you have the opportunity to buy the equipment at the end of the leading period, but other arrangements are designed so that you can return or trade in the equipment after a certain period of time. Because you don’t have to purchase the equipment, leases can be a good option for businesses that only need equipment for a short time, or frequently need to upgrade expensive equipment (like computers) due to changes in technology.

Equipment financing, especially equipment loans, will most likely be more expensive in the long run than purchasing the equipment outright. However, if you can’t afford what you need, an equipment loan or lease is an excellent way to get financing.

Head over to What Is Equipment Financing? to learn more about this type of financing, or our equipment financing review category to learn about individual financiers.

Final Thoughts

Business owners have many financing tools at their disposal, but finding the right tool for the job can take some work. The above resources will point you in the right direction.

Need some more help? Merchant Maverick’s Community of Lenders is there for you. We’ve teamed up with banks, credit unions, and other financiers across the country to provide our readers with fast and easy business financing. With one short application, you can check your eligibility for all participating financial institutions. Read more about the service, including a step-by-step guide through the application process, in Mirador Finance & Merchant Maverick: Making Small Business Loans Easier.

The post 8 Ways To Finance Your Small Business appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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Exactly what is a Synthetic Lease?


If you’ve ever purchased equipment or property for the company, you’ve most likely observed there are a lot of various kinds of leases available, with a lot of creative names. Regrettably, oftentimes, what they are called don’t convey a obvious concept of the things they really are. So what is is really a synthetic lease, exactly?

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Exactly what is a Synthetic Lease?

Synthetic leases were common within the late ’90s and early ’00s, declined publish-2008, and therefore are now visiting a resurgence. Generally, they’re only provided by institutions using the sources to navigate the regulatory structure these contracts make an effort to take advantage of.

In a fundamental level, an artificial lease is definitely an operating lease. Normally which means that the lender (the lessor) maintains formal possession from the asset and rents it towards the business (the lessee) throughout the lease. One of the greatest attractions from the operating lease would be that the asset never seems around the lessee’s balance sheet and could be wiped off being an expense.

Sounds easy, right? Well, synthetic leases are considerably more complicated than that. Actually, they might require a really sophisticated understanding of tax and leasing law if you wish to avoid legal troubles. Because of this, you’re more prone to discover their whereabouts provided by major banks than alternative lenders.

Inside a synthetic lease, the lessee or even the lessor results in a new entity, which assumes possession from the equipment. This entity is nominally independent, a minimum of enough that need considering another business. After that it leases that focal point in the lessee being an operating lease. It effectively functions like a capital lease for that special-purpose entity as well as an operating lease for that lessee. Used, because the intermediate entity is simply a helpful fiction, an artificial lease is really a capital lease for tax purposes but a practical lease for accounting purposes.

Synthetic leases usually feature 5-year terms.

Hold On, Aren’t Lease Laws and regulations Altering?

They’re. Actually, instantly, the brand new law appears enjoy it would largely make synthetic leases obsolete. But, once we catch up with towards the new regulatory structure, synthetic leases have become more prevalent again.

So what’s happening?

The financial alchemy is fairly complex, but synthetic leases still provide a couple of benefits of companies that may pull them off. Ideally, they are able to considerably lessen the liability connected using the asset. Additionally they provide some versatility for businesses that are looking the choice to buy the asset prior to the finish from the term.

Would You Like One?

The typical company most likely won’t discover the complexity of the synthetic lease to become useful, presuming they’re capable of acquire one whatsoever. This is also true because of the coming changes to leasing law.

Bigger investment corporations, particularly individuals coping with large-scale property development, might find the accounting math calculates within their favor. They’ll, however, still to take into consideration the altering lease laws and regulations, that will eliminate the opportunity to keep your asset from their balance sheets.

Conclusion

Still confused? We can’t really blame you. Synthetic leases are among the more complicated ideas in leasing, made much more confusing through the coming changes to lease law. The good thing is that you’re unlikely to finish up signing one unless of course you particularly seek one out.

Chris Motola

Chris Motola is definitely an independent author, journalist, programmer, and game designer that has mastered the skill of using his laptop in no less than 541 positions, many of them unergonomic. When he isn’t pushing keys or swiping screens, he’s most likely out exploring urban or natural environs, experimenting in the kitchen area, or delighting/annoying his buddies together with his ideas and theories.

Chris Motola

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The Reality Behind Free Charge Card Processing

Truth behind free credit card processing imageFree. Free like a bird. Free as with beer. Whatever saying you affiliate using the word “free,” the thought of getting something for free has a unique appeal. Obviously, just about everyone has learned right now that nearly nothing that’s marketed to be “free” comes with no price of some type. Whether it’s offering your individual information to Facebook or simply having to pay hidden charges on something you thought would be free, there’s always a catch.

Charge card processing services aren’t any different. You probably know this: every merchant is most likely just a little unhappy concerning the fact that they need to feel the hassle and cost of establishing a credit card merchant account so their clients may use charge cards. Getting to pay for the charge card processing charges whenever a customer utilizes a card causes it to be a whole lot worse. In a perfect world, having to pay having a charge card wouldn’t differ (or costlier) than having to pay with cash. Regrettably, within the real life, this really is not going to happen. Issuing banks basically need to loan customers the cash to pay for their charge card charges, which inevitably requires the risk they will not be compensated back. Charge card associations, likewise, only earn money by charging interchange charges whenever their cards are utilized. Because it stands today, someone has to cover charge card usage, which someone is nearly always you, the merchant.

How can this be? The primary reason is the fact that customers shouldn’t need to pay extra only for utilizing their charge cards. If you wish to take advantage of the additional sales that allowing charge cards brings, you need to accept the trade-from absorbing the price of processing individuals transactions. With charge card usage soaring and customers more and more not really transporting money with them, this compromise may even work out to your benefit. Nevertheless, it is easy to transfer the price of charge card processing on your customers, a minimum of in many states. This practice is known as surcharging, although you’ll also listen to it known as zero-fee processing or something like that.

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How Surcharging Works:

Surcharging is just the procedure for transferring the price of charge card processing on your customers by means of yet another fee that’s put into their bill once they develop a transaction. The very first factor you should know about surcharging is it isn’t legal in most jurisdictions. Presently, 41 states allow surcharging in a single form or any other, even though the needs you’ll need to meet to do this change from condition to condition. Nine states ban surcharging altogether. Here’s a summary of america in which you can’t surcharge:

  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Florida
  • Kansas
  • Maine
  • Massachusetts
  • New You are able to
  • Oklahoma
  • Texas

If you are located in certainly one of individuals states, you will not have the ability to surcharge whatsoever. If you’re located elsewhere but conduct business within the affected states, you will not have the ability to surcharge any transactions via individuals jurisdictions. California has additionally banned surcharging, however the statute was discovered to be unconstitutional in 2015 with a Federal court and it is presently unenforceable.

Surcharging will also apply simply to charge card transactions. If your customer pays with debit cards, cash, or eCheck (ACH) payment, you can’t give a surcharge. You’ll need to have your charge card terminal (or POS system, virtual terminal, or payment gateway) established to only apply surcharges to transactions in which the customer is having to pay having a charge card. Any processor can perform this for you personally, although most traditional credit card merchant account providers don’t advertise the supply of surcharging. You’ll also need to provide notice for your customers that they’ll need to pay a surcharge for implementing their charge cards. Retailers can meet this requirement with signs and placards published within their business, while eCommerce retailers will need to include these details online.

When you can surcharge with any processor, as well as your current provider, nowadays there are numerous companies available on the market specializing in supplying the things they call “free” or “zero-fee” charge card processing. We’ll check out a few of the more well-known zero-fee providers later in the following paragraphs. To understand more about surcharging and also the needs for applying it, please visit our article Every One Of Your Help guide to Charge Card Surcharges.

Legalities:

Surcharging hasn’t existed for very lengthy. In 2005, several retailers filed an enormous class-action suit (known as the Payment Card Interchange Fee and Merchant Discount Antitrust Litigation) against Visa and MasterCard, alleging the charge card associations were charging unreasonably high interchange charges and stopping them from passing this cost onto consumers. A $7.25 billion settlement was arrived at this year that decreased interchange charges and permitted surcharging. This settlement was initially authorized by the Federal District Court judge, which is when surcharging (and firms specializing in configuring it) first made an appearance in this area. However, the settlement was overturned in June 2016 through the U . s . States Court of Appeals for that Second Circuit if this was challenged on appeal.

Since that time, the situation continues to be appealed again, this time around towards the U . s . States Top Court. In March 2017, the final Court declined to listen to the situation. At this moment, the prior settlement is not valid and also the situation continues to be came back lower towards the District Court level, in which the parties will either must see trial or make an effort to achieve another settlement.

Although this may all appear really perplexing (which is), the conclusion here would be that the practice of surcharging is on very shaky legal ground although this action remains litigated. The next court ruling could invalidate the practice altogether – departing retailers to scramble to regulate the way they purchase processing charges and most likely forcing most of the processors who focus on surcharging bankrupt. If you are considering surcharging your clients, you’ll want to understand this legal cloud and an eye on the progress of the suit.

Pros and cons for Surcharging:

Whether surcharging is not going anywhere soon, there are many issues you’ll be thinking about prior to deciding to begin using it. Here are the benefits and drawbacks you have to consider:

PROS:

  • Lower costs for the business: Clearly, the main benefit of surcharging is it helps you save a lot of money, that ought to result in greater profits. At the very least, your clients is going to be having to pay your processing charges rather individuals, helping you save around 2.-3.5% on every transaction. You might, obviously, still need pay a variety of separate charges connected with preserving your credit card merchant account. Included in this are monthly account charges, annual charges, PCI compliance charges, yet others. However, some providers will help you to pass these charges on your customers too by charging a rather greater processing fee for every transaction.
  • It encourages your clients to make use of alternate payment methods: If customers know they’ll need to pay a surcharge to make use of their charge card, most of them will avoid having to pay extra by utilizing cash, debit cards, or perhaps a personal check. This benefits you too, because the surcharge isn’t likely to you anyway, which other payment methods cost little or free to process.

CONS:

  • High possibility of lost sales: It ought to go without having to say that the customers will not be at liberty about getting to pay for a surcharge. Retailers happen to be having to pay processing charges for such a long time since most consumers simply don’t realize that it is extra to utilize a charge card. They’ve been resistant to this added expense, with no one likes to need to start having to pay for something that’s been free previously. A current poll discovered that 65% of respondents would stop utilizing their charge cards and depend on other payment methods when they needed to pay a surcharge.
  • Surcharging doesn’t eliminate all your credit card merchant account costs: As we’ve noted, you’ll still may need to pay all of the charges that inevitably include getting a free account. When you could possibly pass a few of the fixed charges on your customers, you’ll still result in such things as chargebacks, Address Verification Service (AVS) charges, and terminal lease charges. Additionally you cannot charge a surcharge greater than 4.%, that is under the particular processing fee that some providers charges you. Within this situation, you’ll need to make in the difference.
  • Legalities regarding surcharging: As we’ve noted above, there’s presently a legitimate cloud hanging over the concept of surcharging. Opt for the variations in condition law concerning the practice. While only nine states have banned it outright, you may expect the dpi to develop if surcharging gets to be more prevalent and consumers demand action using their condition legislatures.
  • Competitive disadvantage: You should know whether your competition are surcharging before you think about following a practice. Clearly, there’s a strong possibility that you’ll lose a minimum of some customers permanently should you surcharge along with other competing companies don’t.

“Zero-Fee” Processing Providers:

Using the charge card associations now allowing surcharging (a minimum of for now, and just under certain conditions), there are many processors joining the marketplace specializing in it. Obviously, you are able to surcharge making use of your current credit card merchant account provider, however these companies take proper care of everything establishing your bank account and equipment that you’d otherwise need to do yourself.

Many of these companies bill their professional services as “free charge card processing” or “zero-fee processing.” The term “surcharging” is seldom used. This practice, obviously, is quite deceitful. They’re attempting to make you believe you’re in some way making your way around having to pay interchange charges, while in fact you’re really just passing them to your customers. Here are a few short profiles of the couple of from the more prominent zero-fee processors:

ChargePass:

ChargePass logo

ChargePass is really a small provider headquartered in New You are able to City, New You are able to. The organization markets their service as “free” charge card processing. They support all major charge cards (including MasterCard, Visa, Discovery, and American Express). Additionally they support NFC-based payment methods for example Apple Pay, as well as offer EMV-compliant charge card terminals.

ChargePass doesn’t disclose any one of their processing rates or charges online. Billing is month-to-month, without any lengthy-term contract with no early termination fee. You can try their Conditions and terms to see all the small print that pertains to their accounts. The organization sets your equipment to instantly use a discount for money payments. While account charges aren’t disclosed, additionally they provide a No-Fee Program. Should you join it, your clients pays a greater processing rate, that is then put on your monthly charges. Other choice is to pay for the monthly charges yourself, which enables your clients to pay for lower surcharges.

The organization also provides a radio charge card terminal, a “web portal” (really an online terminal) that is included with a USB-connected magstripe readers, a mobile payments application, along with a magstripe card readers for the smartphone or tablet. Regrettably, their service doesn’t presently use eCommerce platforms.

ChargePass mandates that retailers possess a minimum $10,000 monthly processing volume to become approved to have an account. While the organization markets to retailers and expertise, it seems that lots of their clients are taxi cabs along with other transportation providers (i.e., buses and shuttle vans).

We couldn’t locate much feedback – negative or positive – about ChargePass. The organization doesn’t actually have a BBB profile. While the lack of complaints isn’t a lot of an endorsement, it’s a minimum of a great indication that ChargePass isn’t a gimmick. One factor we noted online was they imply their service will come in all 50 states. As we’ve noted, surcharging is presently illegal in nine states.

Dynamic Payment Systems:

Dynamic Payment Systems logo

Dynamic Payment Systems is yet another “zero-fee” processing provider, situated in Traverse City, Michigan. In case your first impression of the company comes from their site, you most likely won’t want to use them. It’s quite awful, with lots of spelling and grammar errors in nearly every sentence on every page from the site. Nevertheless, they are doing disclose a bit more details about their service than many of their competitors. They list every condition where surcharging isn’t permitted, along with other limitations on the best way to use their service.

The organization can accept charge card payments from Visa, MasterCard, and Uncover. It normally won’t allow an atm card or payments made using PayPal (it is because PayPal bans surcharging). Additionally they support eCommerce along with other card-not-present transactions. Dynamic Payment Systems offers a number of charge card terminals, such as the Verifone Vx520 and wireless Vx680 models. Regrettably, it seems that terminals are just available via a lease, that you simply should absolutely avoid. The organization also provides an online terminal and POS systems, that they will sell you outright.

Dynamic Payment Systems seems to depend heavily on independent sales people to promote their professional services, and features a recruiting pitch for ISOs online. Although this practice doesn’t appear to possess generated any complaints, remember that independent agents through the processing industry possess a terrible status for misleading and dishonest sales practices.

The organization doesn’t disclose any prices info on its website, however they seem to charge a set 3.45% processing charge on every transaction. If you would like the surcharge to visit toward covering your monthly charges, the speed increases to three.65% per transaction. These minute rates are particularly greater than you’ll usually pay with a classical processor, and therefore are most likely suggestive of the rates billed by other “zero-fee” processors. When you will not be having to pay these rates yourself, they’re definitely not going to aid in having your people to accept the thought of having to pay a surcharge for implementing their charge cards.

Unless of course you go searching for the greater surcharge rate to pay for your charges, you’ll need to pay $5.00 monthly a account. You’ll also pay $6.99 monthly for PCI compliance, and perhaps equipment leasing charges too. Not quite “free,” could it be?

Dynamic Payment Systems doesn’t seem to sell to specific business types, so we couldn’t find any negative feedback about the organization online. It normally won’t disclose the size of their contracts either, so look out for a lengthy-term hire a potential early termination fee (ETF).

Shift Processing:

Shift Processing logo

Another “zero-fee” processing provider, Shift Processing offers both traditional and surcharged processing. The organization uses Pivotal Payments his or her backend processor, but seems to provide somewhat better terms overall. They don’t charge a yearly fee, and billing is month-to-month without any lengthy-term contracts. Additionally they claim that they can provide “free” equipment, but we’re very skeptical of the because it’s a typical misleading claim within the processing industry. There’s more often than not an expense mounted on equipment provided for you from your credit card merchant account provider.

Shift Processing also advertises the supply of high-risk merchant services, but it isn’t obvious from their site whether surcharged processing can be obtained of these retailers. The organization offers a number of charge card terminals, including mixers support EMV and NFC-based payment methods. Prices isn’t disclosed, so be very cautious about unintentionally registering for a terminal lease.

While the website includes a nice, professional appearance, it mostly contains marketing fluff and offers hardly any concrete information. Prices isn’t disclosed, and there isn’t any reference to prices models. You will find, obviously, lots of claims they have the “lowest rates.” They most likely don’t. This may not matter for you if you are likely to surcharge, however it could ultimately affect your main point here in case your customers choose that they’re having to pay an excessive amount of to make use of their charge cards and place their business elsewhere.

The organization seems to promote to regional junk food chains, even though they declare that their “zero-fee” prices option works for almost any kind of business. Unlike another surcharging specialists we’ve profiled in the following paragraphs, Shift Processing has a number of testimonials from verified clients online. The organization does not have a BBB profile, so we weren’t capable of finding any negative feedback about the subject online. While the lack of negative feedback can often be a great sign – designed for a bigger company – we’re still suspicious given Shift Processing’s relatively small size.

Final Ideas on “Zero-Fee” Processing:

From the merchant’s perspective, it can make sense the customer should bear the additional price of utilizing a charge card. Customers have a wide range of payment methods to select from, and when they pick one that ultimately is more expensive to make use of, they should need to pay the additional expense associated with charge card processing. Regrettably, it is not how it operates within the real life. Customers have been receiving away without having to pay extra to make use of charge cards for such a long time that it is simply expected. Convincing the general public they should need to pay for something that’s formerly been freedom be a constant struggle.

Alterations in preferred payment methods through the years allow it to be less likely that surcharging is ever going to gain prevalent public acceptance. It was not that lengthy ago that many consumers transported a checkbook along with a wallet filled with money with them wherever they went. It is not the situation today. Having to pay with cash has delivered dramatically recently, and paper checks are nearly a factor of history. Simultaneously, using debit and credit cards has soared. Since consumers could make NFC-based payments using their smartphones (as well as watches), it’s less likely that they’ll acquiesce to having to pay a surcharge or revert to classical payment methods.

Overall, we’re simply not believing that surcharging your clients may be beneficial, so we doubt that it is ever likely to be advisable. Unless of course your competition happen to be surcharging, it’s probably that you’ll lose a lot of sales should you start surcharging. You may emerge ahead when the savings in processing charges over-shadow losing business, but on the other hand, you may shed more pounds money than it will save you.

The legal uncertainty surrounding surcharging is yet another valid reason to prevent it. We actually won’t know before the class action lawsuit from the charge card associations is finally made the decision whether surcharging is not going anywhere soon. Even if it’s upheld, there’s still the chance that more states will proceed to ban the practice because of an outcry using their voters.

We weren’t very impressed with the providers we checked out specializing in offering “zero-fee” processing. All of them seem to be really small firms that only have been around for any couple of years, and not one of them appear to possess established a status – bad or good – to assist their claims of having the ability to help you save money. Insufficient prices disclosures and frequent utilization of independent sales people are further reasons to step back.

You will find, obviously, always exceptions. Certain specific business types, where surcharging has already been a typical practice, could possibly surcharge without experiencing a loss of revenue of economic. Taxi cabs along with other transportation companies, for instance, can frequently pull off surcharging because of the nature from the transaction. If you’ve just finished a cab ride and all you need to pay with is really a charge card, you will not cash choice but to pay for the surcharge too.

Our final recommendation for retailers thinking about surcharging is by using your family processor – not among the companies focusing on it. It may need a bit more focus on your finish, but you’ll most likely have lower processing rates to pass through to your customers and (hopefully) better customer support. Additionally you won’t need to bother about switching providers.

Have you ever had any knowledge about the companies profiled in the following paragraphs? Have you ever had any knowledge about surcharging generally? For those who have, please inform us about this within the comments section below. Thanks!

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The Reason Why You Shouldn’t Lease a Charge Card Machine

credit-card-terminal-picAlthough the concept of leasing has declined recently, some sales people will still try to convince you that leasing may be the right choice for you. They’ll let you know a lot of excellent achievements like, “you’re not needed to pay for anything in advance,Inches or “you’re guaranteed a substitute terminal if yours breaks.”

Individuals selling points might seem good, but I’m here to let you know that they’re not. I’m here to let you know that the terminal lease will finish up squandering your hundreds, otherwise 1000s of dollars. I’m also here to let you know by using the charges you’ll finish up having to pay to lease a terminal, you can purchase that very same machine within months…if not immediately. Heck, you can most likely buy several.

Furthermore, should you lease a terminal you may even be needed to buy equipment insurance, that is another added cost. And, as well as, you may also need to return the damn factor in the finish of the lease. WTF?!

Why Purchasing a Charge Card Machine is the greatest Option

Listen, a terminal lease carries by using it a 48 month lease agreement (the usual term). The price of that lease can run between $50-$100/month. That’s a Lengthy time for you to be having to pay for any machine that does not are more expensive than $400 nowadays. Why don’t you just get one outright?

The price of the acquisition is totally tax deductible, and also you won’t find yourself in trouble having to pay $2400 for any machine which costs $400. That’s 600 percent in interest during the period of 4 years. Yikes!

Even though you can’t manage to pay cash for the charge card machine, you can easily charge it to some business charge card. The eye compensated continues to be tax deductible, and presuming you’ve got a 14 % APR, should you spend the money for same $50/month toward your charge card balance that you’d have compensated toward your lease, you’ll possess the terminal compensated off in under nine several weeks. That’s a savings of nearly $2,000 that may be better directed into developing and expanding your company. It’s a real no-brainer.

The “Free” Charge Card Machine

Some processors supply “free” terminals for their retailers, but as everyone knows, there’s nothing free nowadays. Generally, a totally free terminal carries by using it an annual “Terminal Replacement” or “Warranty” control of between $50-$100/year. That’s still much under exactly what a lease would set you back though.

So, should you can’t purchase one, find out if your processor provides you with one for “free.” Both CDGcommerce and Gotmerchant.com possess a free terminal program that’ll cost you about $79/year.

Conclusion

If you are already locked right into a lease, you almost certainly won’t in a position to break anything. When I pointed out before, a lease term is generally 48 several weeks, so you’ll need to know when that term ends before you leave with no penalty.

If you are not presently inside a lease, but they are thinking about one, never be fooled by exaggerated claims from sales people. Rather, do your personal homework and calculate the all inclusive costs of leasing versus. owning. I know you’ll discover that the very best and many affordable option is based on possession.

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