8 Facts You Should Know Before Crowdfunding A Video Game On Fig

fig crowdfunding

For as long as I can remember, people have bemoaned the ever-accelerating consolidation of the video game industry. For much of the past two decades, small-to-mid-size game developers have been going bust as industry behemoths like EA grow ever more dominant. For those who have followed the industry, it’s an ever-present trend and one that is not likely to abate anytime soon.

However, the second decade of the twenty-first century has given rise to a phenomenon that could be seen as a countervailing force to this trend; a social media-powered boat, gamely pushing upstream against The Market’s unloved current. Crowdfunding pools the resources of those who want a piece of the next big thing, delivering grassroots funding to projects that would otherwise struggle to get funding.

Anyone with a cursory familiarity with crowdfunding could tell you what Kickstarter (see our review) and GoFundMe (see our review) are, but lesser-known specialty crowdfunders continue to pop up, catering to the particulars of individual industries.

Enter Fig. Launched in 2015 in San Francisco, Fig is a platform on which independent game developers and mid-size game studios can get video games crowdfunded. However, Fig is more than just a “Kickstarter for Video Games.”

It’s a unique crowdfunding system and one that presents unique challenges to those looking to use crowdfunding to finance their gaming dreams. Let’s go through what you need to know before using Fig’s crowdfunding platform for game developers.

1) Fig Provides Both Rewards Crowdfunding & Equity Crowdfunding For Video Games

With Fig, you can set up a crowdfunding campaign for your incipient game project that gives the would-be backer two options: back a traditional rewards crowdfunding campaign in exchange for a copy of the game, branded swag, expansion packs, etc., or back an equity crowdfunding campaign in which the backer becomes an investor who buys Fig Game Shares and thereby stands to profit from future sales of the game.

Actually, I lied. The backer also has a third option: back both!

You probably have a decent handle on what rewards crowdfunding is, but with Fig’s equity crowdfunding, investors fund your game’s development by buying Fig Game Shares (more on how Fig Game Shares work later). At the end of the process, the profits from sales of your game are divided between your company, Fig, and the equity investors who bought Fig Game Shares in your game

2) You Can Run Both A Rewards And An Equity Campaign Or Just A Rewards Campaign

I said in the introduction that Fig wasn’t just “Kickstarter for video games.” However, if you’re not trying to raise six or seven digits’ worth or capital, you can, in fact, treat Fig as if it were Kickstarter and just run a rewards crowdfunding campaign. Describe/show off your cool game, offer various rewards for different tiers of support, and hope to raise your goal within your funding period.

However, most Fig campaigners opt to run both a rewards campaign and an equity campaign concurrently. This way, you can attract support from the more casual backer who may want to see your game produced and ultimately receive a copy, as well as the investor who sees profit potential in your game idea and wants to support it in exchange for a cut of future sales.

Check out the campaign page for Pig Eat Ball if you want to see what Fig’s unique brand of rewards/equity hybrid crowdfunding looks like in action.

3) Fig Is Selective

Some crowdfunding platforms allow anybody who signs up and creates a profile to launch a crowdfunding campaign on their platform. Not Fig. According to the company, when a developer applies to use the platform:

We evaluate the game and the developer to determine whether, in our opinion, they have the potential to generate significant income based on criteria such as experience and talent of the developer, the developer’s record for delivering games on time and within budget, our estimates of potential sales of the game and the extent of the game’s existing social community and fanbase.

Also note that Fig only hosts one or two new funding campaigns per month. When considering whether to send your pitch to Fig, determine whether you can afford to, in effect, wait in line for your chance to be featured on the site.

4) Funding Is All-Or-Nothing For Both Rewards And Equity Campaigns

Just about every crowdfunding platform requires you to set some kind of funding goal before launching your campaign. Some crowdfunders let you keep whatever money you end up raising regardless of whether or not you’ve reached your funding goal before your funding period ends.

Not so with Fig. Launch a Fig crowdfunding campaign, and you’ll have to meet or exceed your funding goal before you can collect. Fail to reach your funding goal, and you’ll get nothing at all. This goes for both rewards and equity campaigns. You’ll want to have done your due diligence before launching your campaign with Fig, as an 80% funded project will see you get 0% of the cash.

5) Investors Aren’t Actually Buying Shares Of Your Company

Launch an equity crowdfunding campaign with Fig and you won’t have to worry about investors owning a portion of your intellectual property. That’s because with Fig’s unique equity crowdfunding system, the investor invests in stock created by Fig to pay dividends based on the sales receipts from the game post-release. Fig describes the system like so:

Developers maintain 100% creative control and IP ownership over their game. The community invests in Fig Game Shares, which pay out based on Fig’s own revenue share gained through a licensing agreement with the developer, and Fig takes on the accounting and legal risk associated with the investments as it’s our stock. Developers are not involved in selling investments, nor are investors investing in studios or IP.

Here’s where you can learn more about Fig Game Shares. Essentially, they allow you to retain full ownership of your company and its products while offering investors the chance to profit from your future game sales commensurate with the proportion of Fig Game Shares they purchased.

6) Fig’s Rewards Crowdfunding Campaigns Carry No Platform Fees

If you’re using Fig as if it were Kickstarter and just want to run a rewards campaign, there’s one way in which Fig is actually superior to Kickstarter. Let me explain.

Kickstarter, like most non-charitable crowdfunding sites, charges a 5% platform fee from what you raise. Factor in payment processing fees, which can come to about 3-5% of what you raise, and you could be paying 8-10% of what you raise in fees.

Fig, however, does things differently. Launch a rewards campaign with Fig and you won’t pay any platform fees. You will only have to pay credit card processing fees. These will come out to about 2.5% of what you raise. If you’re an independent game publisher looking to use rewards crowdfunding to get your project started, this factor alone gives Fig a leg up on the competition.

For Fig’s equity crowdfunding campaigns, the company states the following:

If and only if the campaign succeeds, a portion of Fig’s out-of-pocket legal and accounting transaction costs will be deducted from the investment proceeds (up to 5%).

7) Fig Can Publish Your Game As Well

Fig states the following regarding its publishing services:

Fig stands as a non-exclusive co-publisher of your game, so you can maintain control over the publishing of your game while receiving Fig’s support in distribution and marketing. Fig is open to exclusively publishing your game if that is your desire. Some developers have requested we exclusively publish their games.

Fig’s publishing services can be opted into — you are not required to use them to publish your game.

8) You Can Run A Private Funding Campaign Before You Go Public

Is your video game idea still in its embryonic stage? Is it unworthy of being seen by the general public at this point? You might want to consider running a private funding campaign before you run a public one.

Fig’s Backstage Pass Program lets you do exactly this. Through this program, Fig’s most hyper-attuned backers can evaluate your campaign away from the prying eyes of the public and give you valuable feedback, all while you start the fundraising process, getting a head-start on your public crowdfunding campaign.


Here’s a disclaimer I’ve started attaching to everything I write related to equity crowdfunding:

Bear in mind that equity crowdfunding is a still-evolving field, with the full impact of the JOBS Act still being assessed. Equity crowdfunding is a more complex proposition than, say, rewards-based crowdfunding, as investing is much more substantially regulated. Consult an attorney if you have any legal questions regarding the process, SEC regulations, taxes, etc.

Final Thoughts

No form of popular entertainment inspires as much passionate devotion (among other things) as does the video game. For those looking to get in on the ground floor of the industry, crowdfunding is a way you can fund your passion projects while a) retaining control of your work, and b) not going into debt.

Fig’s particular brand of video game crowdfunding gives independent developers and game studios alike the ability to fund their work by monetizing the all-consuming devotion of video game fans. Just make sure you know the essentials before you embark on your crowdfunding journey.

The post 8 Facts You Should Know Before Crowdfunding A Video Game On Fig appeared first on Merchant Maverick.


GoFundMe Alternatives: 10 Sites Like GoFundMe For Business Funding

gofundme alternatives

In terms of raw numbers, GoFundMe (see our review) stands atop the crowdfunding industry. With over $5 billion in crowdfunded dollars raised from over 50 million donors since its founding in 2010, no crowdfunding platform has been able to match GoFundMe in terms of transferring money to those who need it. What’s more, since late 2017, GoFundMe has started eliminating their 5% platform fee for individual crowdfunding campaigns (the 0% platform fee now applies to campaigns started in the US, UK, and Canada).

However, there are plenty of reasons why an entrepreneur looking to crowdfund a startup or a small business might look for an alternative to GoFundMe. While people can and do use GoFundMe to fundraise for businesses, the vast majority of campaigns on the site are personal campaigns for charitable causes, often to cover medical expenses. Facilitating commerce isn’t the focus of GoFundMe’s brand.

Let’s go through some of the GoFundMe alternatives you can use to fund your business.


Kickstarter (see our review) needs no introduction, but I’ll write one anyway out of habit. Between Kickstarter’s 2009 birth and today, the company has become synonymous with crowdfunding. Kickstarter has raised over $3.5 billion in funding pledged to its campaigns (more than any crowdfunding site besides GoFundMe), boasts more than 140,000 successfully funded projects with over 14 million total backers. You might say the folks at Kickstarter have hit the big time.

Kickstarter embodies the concept of rewards crowdfunding: crowdfunding in which backers support campaigns and receive rewards in return, typically in the form of the product being produced.

Best For…

Kickstarter helps artists, musicians, filmmakers, designers, and other creators find the resources and support they need to make their ideas a reality.

Thus reads Kickstarter’s About page. It sums up Kickstarter’s target audience: those in the business of creating things to share with others. For instance, Kickstarter almost single-handedly spawned the current “golden age” of tabletop games. Game makers found Kickstarter to be the ideal platform from which to launch their passion projects. Tech startups have hit paydirt on the platform as well.

How Does Kickstarter Work?

Kickstarter’s product on offer is its rewards crowdfunding platform. The details of the platform are as follows:

  • Campaigns can be open for 30 to 60 days
  • Campaigns are all-or-nothing — you either meet your funding goal by the time your campaign ends, or you get no funds whatsoever
  • A 5% platform fee is taken from what you raise
  • A 3% + $0.20 payment processing fee is taken from each pledge made to you

Kickstarter Rules

Kickstarter has five rules for projects:

  • Projects must create something to share with others
  • Projects must be honest and clearly presented
  • Projects can’t fundraise for charity
  • Projects can’t offer equity
  • Projects can’t involve prohibited items

Pay special attention to the first rule. In order to host a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign, you must offer rewards to your potential backers. It’s not optional. Furthermore, these rewards must be of your making and must relate to your project. They can’t just be whatever you have sitting around the house.

How To Start A Kickstarter Campaign

Go to the website, choose a category, enter the basic details of your project into the form, and confirm your identity. When you submit your project for review, you might pass the automated check and be able to start immediately, or your project might be flagged for additional screening, which can take up to three days. Kickstarter estimates that about 80% of submitted projects are accepted.


Hobbyists, tech geeks, and superfans continue to demonstrate their willingness to spend money on crowdfunding projects in order to get in on The Next Big Thing, and Kickstarter is the best-known place to do just that. Their track record of crowdfunding success is second to none. It’s very competitive, though, so you best have done your due diligence prior to launch. If you have, who knows? Your project could take off on social media and become the next great cultural phenomenon; the next viral dream that captures the imagination of a generation; the next RompHim.


I only pray you experience such spiritual validation in your lifetime. Kickstarter: Catch the fever!

Read our full Kickstarter review

Visit the Kickstarter website


Indiegogo (see our review) was launched at the Sundance Film Festival in 2008. It was originally conceived as a crowdfunding platform for independent films. Soon thereafter, Indiegogo expanded its mission, and is now a leader in the crowdfunding industry. Indiegogo’s rewards crowdfunding platform is more flexible and less exclusive than that of Kickstarter, as Indiegogo doesn’t prescreen projects prior to launch. Many startups have found success on Indiegogo after being rejected by Kickstarter.

Indiegogo also hosts equity crowdfunding campaigns through a joint venture with MicroVentures (see our review). Equity crowdfunding means your backers are purchasing shares in your company — they aren’t just backing you to get a t-shirt or a board game. Because equity crowdfunding involves investing, it is much more heavily regulated than rewards crowdfunding. Unlike Indiegogo’s rewards crowdfunding campaigns, the requirements to launch an Indiegogo equity crowdfunding campaign are fairly stringent. The bulk of Indiegogo’s business is on the rewards crowdfunding side.

Best For…

Indiegogo appeals to a lot of the same entrepreneurs and creators as Kickstarter. Tech, games, and the arts (particularly movies, no surprise) are well represented in Indiegogo’s campaign listings. But because Indiegogo doesn’t curate its campaigns the way Kickstarter does, a broader array of businesses can fundraise successfully with Indiegogo.

How Does Indiegogo Work?

Indiegogo’s rewards crowdfunding platform carries the following conditions:

  • Campaigns can last up to 60 days
  • You can choose a keep-what-you-raise campaign (you keep what you raise whether you meet your funding goal or not) OR an all-or-nothing campaign
  • 5% platform fee
  • 3% + $0.30 payment processing fee (per pledge)

Indiegogo Rules

Indiegogo doesn’t restrict entry to its platform — you can start a campaign for just about any non-charitable purpose. Unless you’re later found to be operating a fraud or otherwise violating the terms of service, you’re good to go. And unlike Kickstarter, Indiegogo doesn’t mandate that you offer rewards. They do highly recommend it, however. Campaigns that don’t offer rewards have a tendency to fail.

How To Start An Indiegogo Campaign

Just go to Indiegogo’s website, click “Start A Campaign,” detail your campaign, and launch it!


Indiegogo’s welcoming approach and flexible campaigns make it an excellent crowdfunding choice for businesses and artists of all stripes.

Read our full Indiegogo review:

Visit the Indiegogo website


Patreon (see our review) may be a rewards crowdfunding site, but compared to the likes of Kickstarter and Indiegogo, Patreon is a beast of a different nature. Launch an Indiegogo campaign, and it’s a one-time deal. Once your campaign ends after 30 or 60 days, you get what you get, and that’s that. But with Patreon, your campaign is continuous. It doesn’t end unless you end it. Patrons sign up to support you on a recurring basis (either per-month or per-creation), somewhat akin a subscription service. In return, you provide your patrons exclusive content. Founder and musician Jack Conte discussed his motivations in a 2013 article:

“I’m releasing new things on a monthly basis. I have friends releasing material weekly,” Conte said. “They’d have to almost invent an excuse to raise money after going on Kickstarter once. We’re saying, ‘No, no. Don’t make up a new endeavor. Keep doing what you do best and let people pay you each time you do that.”

Best For…

Those in the business of creation will find Patreon an ideal crowdfunding platform. Game designers, journalists, musicians, comic book artists, and YouTubers are all to be found, though podcasters have had particular success on the platform. From Chapo Trap House to Sam Harris to everything in between, Patreon has been a boon to podcasters.

One thing Patreon has allowed in the past that most crowdfunding sites haven’t is a certain degree of adult content, though that has been changing as of late.

How Does Patreon Work?

These are the terms of using Patreon:

  • Funding duration is unlimited
  • Can charge patrons per month OR per creation
  • 5% platform fee
  • ~5% payment processing fee

Patreon Rules

As long as you don’t violate the terms of service (which are more relaxed than those of many competitors), you should be fine.

How To Start A Patreon Campaign

Sign up online, fill in the form fields, and poof, you’re in!


If creation is your business and GoFundMe doesn’t quite fit what you do, Patreon and its innovative brand of continuous rewards crowdfunding provide a means of monetizing your work.

Read our full Patreon review

Visit the Patreon website


FundRazr (see our review) refers to itself as “Canada’s leading crowdfunding platform.” Though that places it well behind the likes of Kickstarter in regards to total money raised, FundRazr distinguishes itself by having an exceptionally good reputation for a crowdfunding site among both donors and campaigners. I had a hard time finding comments from user upset with the product. This is most definitely not the case with most of the competition!

FundRazr hosts a wide variety of personal and charitable crowdfunding campaigns, though they host business campaigns as well (and not just in Canada).

Best For…

Pretty much any business with something to offer backers can make use of FundRazr.

How Does FundRazr Work?

This is what a FundRazr crowdfunding campaign entails:

  • No mandatory time limit for campaigns
  • Keep-what-you-raise OR all-or-nothing funding — your choice
  • 5% platform fee
  • 2.9% + $0.30 payment processing fee (per pledge)

FundRazr Rules

FundRazr doesn’t prescreen campaigns, nor does it have any particular bent as to what sort of businesses it favors. And while business campaigns should offer rewards, it isn’t mandatory.

How To Start A FundRazr Campaign

Create an account, fill in the details, and you’re on your way.


FundRazr isn’t the most high-profile crowdfunding service in the business, but its exceptional reputation for treating people well makes it worth considering for the startup in need of funding.

Read our full FundRazr review

Visit the FundRazr website


The name resembles FundRazr, but this is a very different platform. Ohio-based Fundable (see our review) is a crowdfunding platform exclusively for businesses. Fundable hosts both rewards and equity-based funding campaigns. Rather than charge a platform fee to users, Fundable charges a monthly fee of $179 to all campaigners. It’s a system that favors serious startups and early-stage companies over small-time artists and creators.

Fundable has sent $411 million in crowdfunded dollars to businesses thus far. Not too shabby at all.

Best For…

Fundable hosts crowdfunding campaigns for a wide variety of businesses, though tech, food service, and healthcare companies are particularly well-represented.

How Does Fundable Work?

Fundable lets you launch both rewards and equity crowdfunding campaigns, though not both simultaneously. Some businesses start with a rewards campaign and, once successful, use the campaign’s success to demonstrate the product’s viability in the market to investors, thus laying the ground for an equity campaign.

Here’s how Fundable campaigns work:

  • No mandatory time limit for campaigns
  • All-or-nothing funding
  • $179 monthly fee
  • 3.5% + $0.30 payment processing fee (rewards campaigns only)

Given the monthly fee and all-or-nothing funding, if your campaign is unsuccessful, you won’t just have raised nothing — you’ll have spent money in order to raise nothing. Try not to fail!

Fundable Rules

Though just about any business can apply to use Fundable, the company prescreens every campaign profile submitted before allowing it onto the platform. A poorly-resourced startup may have better luck using a site with no barrier to entry, like Indiegogo, to crowdfund.

How To Start A Fundable Campaign

Fill out the online application, submit it, and wait for an answer from the company.


Fundable’s terms and fees make it tough for the little guy, but a startup with high growth potential stands to benefit from the absence of the 5% platform fee many crowdfunding sites impose. After all, if you raise $50K, well, 5% of $50K is a lot more than Fundable’s $179 monthly fee!

Read our full Fundable review:

Visit the Fundable website


Wefunder (see our review) has been an innovator in the equity crowdfunding space. A purely business-oriented crowdfunding platform. Wefunder hosts equity campaigns in which non-accredited investors can invest (this is known as Regulation Crowdfunding). The term “accredited investor” basically just means “rich person,” so by allowing non-accredited investors (i.e. everyone) to invest, you’re casting a wider net in your hunt for investors, so to speak.

Equity crowdfunding with non-accredited investors has only been legal since May 2016, but so far, Wefunder holds 50% of the market share in Regulation Crowdfunding. It’s a new field, but Wefunder has it figured out more than anybody.

Best For…

Wefunder hosts funding campaigns for many different business types (particularly craft breweries), but as equity crowdfunding is harder to pull off for unless your project already has some resources behind it, Wefunder is best for startups whose high-profit potential is apparent to investors. In fact, Wefunder states that of the 174 companies that have hit their funding goal on Wefunder’s site, “most are alumni of Y Combinator.” The cream of the crop, in other words.

How Does Wefunder Work?

Wefunder offers equity crowdfunding under the following terms:

  • 1-year funding limit
  • All-or-nothing funding
  • $195 one-time fee
  • 7% platform fee
  • No payment processing fees (all funds are transferred offline)

The 7% platform fee seems a bit high, but consider that with most crowdfunding sites, an additional 3-5% goes to the payment processor, making that apparent 5% platform fee more like 8-10%. Wefunder doesn’t handle online payments, so there are no processing fees to be paid.

Wefunder Rules

Wefunder allows just about any applying company onto its site. The company doesn’t do the heavy vetting that other equity crowdfunders engage in. Wefunder recommends having at least one experienced investor endorse your campaign and set the terms of your raise, but that’s not a requirement.

How To Start A Wefunder Campaign

Just apply online on the website.


Wefunder is one of the few crowdfunding companies with a track record of success in Regulation Crowdfunding. Startups with high growth potential have reason to take a closer look.

Read our full Wefunder review

Visit the Wefunder website


The forgettably-named Crowdfunder (see our review) is unapologetic about being an equity crowdfunding platform for “high-impact ventures” only. Crowdfunder’s equity campaigns are open to accredited investors only, meaning that you’ll be drawing from a smaller, richer, and likely more selective pool of investors than with Wefunder. (Note that the British rewards crowdfunding site named Crowdfunder is an entirely different company)

$160 million in investment commitments have been made via Crowdfunder.

Best For…

Crowdfunder has specific ideas about the identity of its target audience:

Crowdfunder is designed for early-stage startups and more mature businesses raising seed stage, Series-A & Series-B funding. Our offering does not cater to inception stage companies at this time.

Tech, software, and investment companies comprise many of the businesses using Crowdfunder

How Does Crowdfunder Work?

Here are the details of Crowdfunder’s platform:

  • No mandatory time limit for campaigns
  • Keep-what-you-raise funding
  • $449-$749/month subscription fee (depends on your subscription package)
  • No platform fees or payment processing fees (funds are transferred offline)

Crowdfunder’s monthly subscription fees are high. No getting around it.

Crowdfunder Rules

You can set up a profile for free, but in order to actually start your equity campaign, Crowdfunder will have to approve your plans.

How To Start A Crowdfunder Campaign

Sign up and apply through the website, silly.


If your startup company has boundless potential in the eyes of investors, Crowdfunder is a very intriguing prospect. Though the monthly fees are high, they’ll be worth it in the end if you raise a significant sum, as Crowdfunder campaigns don’t carry a percentage platform fee.

Read our full Crowdfunder review

Visit the Crowdfunder website


Headquartered in Paris, Ulule (see our review) is one of Europe’s largest rewards crowdfunding platforms. It’s not widely known in the US, but if you’re in North America and your project appeals to the European market, it’s definitely a crowdfunding site to consider.

Ulule distinguishes itself with what it claims is the highest rate of successful campaigns for any crowdfunder: 65%. The company attributes this to its focus on personalized coaching, which it provides to all campaigners. Indeed, Kickstarter’s success rate is approximately half that of Ulule!

Best For…

Any sort of business can campaign on Ulule, though art-related startups seem to do particularly well.

How Does Ulele Work?

Ulule’s crowdfunding campaigns are structured like so:

  • Campaigns can last up to 90 days (45 is recommended)
  • All-or-nothing funding
  • Platform fees: 6.67% of all funds received via credit card, 4.17% of funds received via check or PayPal
  • ~3% payment processing fee

Ulule’s fee structure could stand to be less complex.

Ulele Rules

Launching a Ulule crowdfunding project requires passing two validation stages. Ulule really wants to make sure your plan is solid before letting you loose on the platform. If you are ultimately accepted, you’ll be assigned a “success manager” to help you with every stage of your campaign. Compared to most of the competition, particularly in the rewards crowdfunding space, Ulule is quite hands-on in its approach to campaigners.

How To Start A Ulele Campaign

Write Ulule an essay explaining why you think you’re worthy of their platform and send it to them in the mail.

I kid, I kid. Just apply online.


Ulule does things differently than most of the crowdfunding sites on this side of the pond. More consultation, more guidance. Does this approach jibe with your needs? If your company produces things that have Continental appeal, give Ulule a closer look.

Read our full Ulule review

Visit the Ulule website

Republicrepublic review

Republic (see our review) is, like Wefunder, a Regulation Crowdfunding platform — an equity crowdfunding outfit open to any and all investors.

Founded by AngelList alumni and considered to be an AngelList spinoff, Republic stands out for its public commitment to social justice. The company’s About page details their intention to help level the playing field when it comes to capital by prioritizing women, minorities, and others who the investing world has historically overlooked.

Best For…

Republic may have egalitarian aspirations, but equity crowdfunding is nonetheless best suited to companies with uniquely high-profit potential.

How Does Republic Work?

Republic’s equity crowdfunding campaigns are structured as follows:

  • 1-year funding limit
  • All-or-nothing funding
  • 7% platform fee
  • 3.5% payment processing fee for payments made via credit card

Republic Rules

Companies applying to Republic undergo a thorough evaluation before being allowed to raise funds. The following factors will be taken into consideration:

  • Experience of founders and management team
  • Products, services, and market
  • Revenue and growth
  • Customer base and demographics
  • Fundraising needs
  • Offering terms
  • Business plan
  • Financial health
  • Recordkeeping procedures

How To Start A Republic Campaign

Just apply online through the website.


Being an AngelList spinoff, Republic is already making waves in the equity crowdfunding world. Does its idealistic outlook match reality? The years to come should give us our answer. In the meantime, if you run an exceptional startup and you come from a historically-underserved community, Republic wants your attention.

Read our full Republic review

Visit the Republic website

Kiva USkiva logo

And now for something completely different.

Kiva US (see our review) doesn’t offer rewards crowdfunding or equity crowdfunding. What the heck do they do, then? They offer debt crowdfunding, otherwise known as crowdfunded loans. Kiva US is a nonprofit entity, and the crowdfunded loans it offers carry 0% interest. Not bad, eh? It may be the only platform in which lenders stand to make no profit whatsoever. Kiva’s mission is to open up the lending world to businesses that would otherwise struggle for funding. If you need $10K or less for your business and are willing to wait a bit for your money, Kiva’s crowdfunded loans just might be for you.

Best For…

Absolutely any sort of business can apply for a Kiva US crowdfunded loan.

How Does Kiva US Work?

Here are the details of Kiva’s crowdfunded loans:

  • Borrowing amount: $25 – $10K
  • Term length: 6 – 36 months
  • 0% interest
  • Time to funding: 1-3 months

Kiva US Rules

The only requirement to receive a Kiva US loan is that you put the money towards business expenses.

How To Apply For A Kiva US Loan

Yes, you apply online, but that’s only the first step to getting a Kiva loan. The entire process is as follows:

  1. Fill out an application online
  2. Enter the approval stage
  3. Enter a 15 day private funding period
  4. Enter a 30 day public funding period
  5. Get funds within 5 – 7 days

The process takes a while — certainly longer than with other lenders — but then again, crowdfunding with rewards/equity is hardly an instantaneous process either.


If you own a business, you need less than ten grand, and you want a loan you won’t have to pay interest on, Kiva US is your only funding option. Assuming you can wait a while before seeing any funds, there’s no reason whatsoever not to give it a shot.

Read our full Kiva US review

Visit the Kiva US website

Final Thoughts

If you find yourself looking for a crowdfunding site with more business-specific features than GoFundMe, the ten companies I’ve mentioned are all solid possibilities, depending on the nature of your business, its potential, and whether you want to offer rewards, equity, or debt payments with interest to your potential backers. Consider what makes sense for your business, then make the jump while you can! Your ideas won’t stay ripe indefinitely. Don’t wait too long!

The post GoFundMe Alternatives: 10 Sites Like GoFundMe For Business Funding appeared first on Merchant Maverick.


The 7 Best Equity Crowdfunding Sites For Businesses And Entrepreneurs

So, what is equity crowdfunding, anyway?

Let’s start with the term “crowdfunding.” If you’re only loosely familiar with the concept, you might think of GoFundMe’s brand of medical and charitable crowdfunding. You may also think of rewards-based crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter and Patreon in which entrepreneurs and artists solicit funds from backers in exchange for a physical product or exclusive creative content.

What if I told you that there existed an entirely different form of crowdfunding — one in which entrepreneurs and startups receive funding from backers in exchange, not for gifts or products, but for an equity stake in the company? A crowdfunding campaign in which the backers are investors?

Equity-based crowdfunding got its start later than rewards crowdfunding because crowdfunding involving investments was, until relatively recently, illegal in the US. Enter the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, better known as the JOBS Act. Passed by Congress and signed into law by President Obama in 2012, the JOBS Act amended federal securities regulations to legalize equity crowdfunding. The reasoning was that allowing startups to publicly solicit investment via crowdfunding would help spur the economy in general and startup formation in particular.

The various portions of the Act, however, did not immediately come into force. For instance, the provision that allowed the offering of equity investment to non-accredited investors (more on what this means later) wasn’t actually enacted until 2016. Suffice to say, equity crowdfunding is new. In fact, the reality of equity crowdfunding hasn’t yet lived up to the loftier predictions of those who pushed its creation. Nonetheless, the fact remains that billions of dollars have been raised by startups and companies via equity crowdfunding. For the right kind of business, equity crowdfunding represents a prime opportunity.

If your company is still just getting off the ground, however, you might find that rewards crowdfunding is a better fit for your enterprise, considering that investors tend to be less starry-eyed than the typical crowdfunding project backer. In this case, you might want to read our reviews of Kickstarter, Indiegogo, and Patreon. Bear in mind that in many cases, a successful rewards crowdfunding campaign can set you up for an equity crowdfunding campaign by showing proof of demand to potential investors.

Let’s take a look at the leading equity crowdfunding sites and what they have to offer growing businesses.

But First, A Warning

Let’s pump the brakes for a moment and go over the disclaimer I’ve started putting on my equity crowdfunding reviews:

Bear in mind that equity crowdfunding is a still-evolving field, with the full impact of the JOBS Act still being assessed. Equity crowdfunding is a more complex proposition than, say, rewards-based crowdfunding, as investing is much more substantially regulated. Consult an attorney if you have any legal questions regarding the process, SEC regulations, etc.

In short: Equity crowdfunding is legally complex. Be careful and don’t get into trouble!



Crowdfunder (see our review) was launched in Los Angeles in 2012 with a mission to, in the company’s own words, “empower thousands of entrepreneurs to grow high-impact ventures.” The company provides the following figures regarding equity funding services:

  • $160,000,000 in investment commitments on the platform
  • 12,000 individual & institutional investors
  • 36,000 companies
  • Funded 100+ deals with an average deal size of $1.8M

Let’s take a closer look at the equity crowdfunding platform with the hopelessly generic name. (The company shares its name with an unrelated British rewards crowdfunding site.)

Best For…

Crowdfunder is very explicit regarding its target audience:

Crowdfunder is designed for early-stage startups and more mature businesses raising seed stage, Series-A & Series-B funding. Our offering does not cater to inception stage companies at this time.

The platform accepts businesses that fall into a variety of categories including Tech Startups, Social Enterprises, Small Businesses, and Film & Entertainment.

A look through the companies currently campaigning on Crowdfunder reveals more tech companies than anything else, with financial/investment companies a close second.

Products Offered

Crowdfunder allows companies to raise money via Title II equity crowdfunding. For those who aren’t familiar with what I mean, here’s a brief explainer.

Title II equity crowdfunding essentially means your crowdfunding campaign can solicit investment from accredited investors only. An “accredited investor” is defined someone who either has a net worth of $1,000,000 minus the value of their principal residence OR who made more than $200,000 a year for the past three years. The term simply refers to someone with a certain level of wealth/income — it does not denote any particular investment skill.

Title III equity crowdfunding, or Regulation Crowdfunding, means you can solicit investment from anybody — both from accredited investors and those who are not. Title III crowdfunding was legalized more recently than Title II crowdfunding and is currently less widely used. On its website, Crowdfunder explains why it does not currently allow Title III crowdfunding.

With Crowdfunder, all funds are transferred offline, so Crowdfunder doesn’t take a percentage cut of what you raise. And while it won’t cost you anything to create a (non-public) profile on the platform, you’ll need a monthly subscription in order to launch your equity campaign.

  • Crowdfunder’s Starter package, for $299/month, lets you take your profile public and start raising money.
  • The Premium plan, at $499/month, gives you the above while letting you browse and contact the accredited investors on Crowdfunder’s platform. You also get advanced data/metrics and up to one hour per month of phone support.

I’ll note that in addition to equity-based crowdfunding, Crowdfunder lets you raise money via debt, convertible note, or revenue share offerings. Furthermore, Crowdfunder’s funding campaigns are keep-what-you-raise — you don’t have to hit a specific funding goal to collect funds.


Anyone can set up a profile on Crowdfunder’s website, but in order to launch your campaign, you’ll have to prepare and submit three documents: the Term Sheet, the Executive Summary, and the Investor Pitch Deck. These documents are complex, particularly the Term Sheet. Crowdfunder recommends that you work with an attorney when creating your financial offering.

Of course, you’ll also need to buy a monthly subscription before raising funds.

How To Apply

Anyone can set up a profile on Crowdfunder and submit the documents required for taking your campaign public. However, upon reviewing your documents, it’s up to Crowdfunder’s sole discretion to determine whether your business is “high-impact” enough for their platform.


Startups with boundless growth potential, particularly tech and investment startups, stand to potentially raise significant sums through Crowdfunder’s equity crowdfunding platform. While the monthly fees are high, they’ll be worth it if your campaign is successful, as Crowdfunder doesn’t charge a platform fee.

Read our full Crowdfunder review

Visit the Crowdfunder website


Like Crowdfunder, EquityNet (see our review) is an equity crowdfunding site that doesn’t process transactions itself, but rather facilitates offline transactions between campaigners and investors. Founded in Fayetteville, Arkansas in the pre-crowdfunding days of 2005 as a private investment company, EquityNet started offering equity crowdfunding after the enactment of Title II of the JOBS Act.

Best For…

EquityNet markets itself to a broader range of entrepreneurs and businesses than does Crowdfunder. EquityNet states in its FAQ that they are not just a platform for high-tech and high-growth businesses:

EquityNet is designed with flexibility to accommodate all ranges of private businesses, whether it’s an $100M/yr in revenue international biotech company, a pre-revenue one person software start-up, or a modest one-location coffee shop.

Products Offered

EquityNet offers entrepreneurs and businesses the ability to use its equity crowdfunding platform. EquityNet’s equity campaigns operate under Title II rules, so you’ll be raising funds from accredited investors only. You’ll also get to keep everything you raise regardless of whether you hit your funding goal.

Since all funds are transferred offline, EquityNet doesn’t take a cut of what you raise. Instead, EquityNet operates on a subscription basis. You can actually sign up with EquityNet and publish your business profile for free, but if you want to, say, share your business plan with investors (investors typically like to see a business plan before investing in something!), you’ll need one of EquityNet’s three subscription plans.

  • The Full Access package goes for a one-time fee of $900 and gives you full access to the accredited investors on the site. You’ll also get full access to fundraising documents and EquityNet’s patented business planning tools.
  • The Premium Consulting package goes for $2,500 and gives you all of the above, plus access to one-on-one consultations with an EquityNet team member regarding every aspect of your business plan, funding strategy, pitch, marketing, and more.
  • The EquityNet + plan costs a whopping $25,000 and gives you the ultimate hands-on equity crowdfunding package in which the company tailors everything to your exact needs.

Also note that since all transactions between entrepreneurs and investors occur offline, you can theoretically enter into a debt funding arrangement with an investor or even seek a grant. It’s up to you.


Anyone can freely set up a business profile page on EquityNet. However, EquityNet reserves the right to remove profiles for any reason.

Of course, you’ll need a paid subscription if you want to run an equity funding campaign with any likelihood of success.

How To Apply

Just sign up with EquityNet and set up your profile. EquityNet does not pre-screen businesses before allowing them onto the site.


The folks at EquityNet make a point to try to attract a broad range of businesses to their platform. It’s not just for Silicon Valley tech startups and investment funds. And while the premium services cost a pretty penny, they come with one-time charges, not monthly charges. EquityNet is one of the less elitist equity crowdfunding sites out there, and to that, I’ll tip my cap.

Read our full EquityNet review

Visit the EquityNet website



Founded in 2012 and based in Ohio, Fundable (see our review) is an unusual crowdfunding site in it hosts host both rewards and equity crowdfunding campaigns (though not both simultaneously). Think of it as both a Kickstarter-type platform and an equity crowdfunder. Given the subject of this article, however, I’ll be focusing on the equity side.

Best For…

You can raise funds for just about any type of business endeavor on Fundable. When it comes to choosing a rewards campaign or an equity funding campaign, Fundable states that rewards campaigns “are effective for smaller dollar raises (typically below $50,000)” and goes on to describe the target audience for its equity campaigns:

Equity raises are best for companies looking for larger sums of operating capital to move their business forward. Also, some businesses do not have a developed product or service that they can market through a Rewards raise, so offering equity is their best bet for raising funding.

Products Offered

Fundable is another crowdfunding platform that doesn’t take a percentage of what you raise, but rather charges a flat monthly fee to launch a campaign. Fundable offers two subscription packages:

  • The Standard package costs $179/month and gives you data analytics, email support, a guide for marketing your crowdfunding campaign, and marketing outreach templates.
  • The Premium package is available for a one-time payment of $2499. With this package, Fundable puts you in contact with the accredited investors the company believes will be the most receptive to your pitch. Fundable will also provide a list of relevant media contacts so you can better conduct media outreach for your campaign.

As with the previous two companies discussed, all funds transferred in a Fundable equity campaign are transferred offline. You are therefore free to seek a debt-based funding arrangement (or any other type of funding arrangement).


Once you set up your Company Profile in which you detail your company, your proposed campaign, and your funding goals, you’ll have to wait for Fundable to approve your project before you can continue. If you’re approved, you then choose which type of crowdfunding campaign you’d like to run and a subscription package.

How To Apply

Go to Fundable’s website and get started!


Fundable is a flexible crowdfunding platform in terms of what sort of campaign you can launch through the site, and they provide invaluable assistance with media outreach, marketing, and investor contacts at the highest subscription level. Fundable does pre-screen businesses before allowing them to begin fundraising, however, so make sure you have everything in order before you begin the process.

Read our full Fundable review

Visit the Fundable website


Founded in 2010 in San Francisco, AngelList is one of the leading equity crowdfunding platforms. It’s the only crowdfunding site that doubles as a job board for job-seekers trying to find a position with a startup. AngelList distinguishes itself by being the rare crowdfunding platform that lets entrepreneurs/startups raise money free of charge. All fees are paid by investors. Pretty cool, huh?

Best For…

Anybody can sign up with AngelList and attempt to raise money from the accredited investors on the site. However, AngelList doesn’t quite provide the guidance for those looking to crowdfund that many other crowdfunding platforms give you. Their website is much more spartan than the competition, with relatively little information for startups as to how you launch your campaign. Be prepared to do some research.

Products Offered

AngelList doesn’t offer any subscription packages with special features. You just sign up with AngelList on the website, and once you’ve completed your profile, you can launch your Title II crowdfunding campaign and get in touch with accredited investors.

Companies using AngelList raise money through investment syndicates. It’s an investment arrangement that differs from that of the other crowdfunding sites I’ve detailed today. Essentially, accredited investors give money to “angel” investors who then invest the pooled money into companies on the platform.

Keep in mind that though you won’t have to pay a monthly charge or a cut of what you raise to AngelList, that doesn’t mean there are no costs associated with running an equity campaign. The process of arranging an equity deal with investor syndicates on AngelList will cost you money due to paperwork, legalities, etc.


There are no particular requirements for a company looking to establish a profile on AngelList. Of course, in order to actually raise any money, your plan of action must be formidable enough for AngelList’s syndicates to take an interest in you, so this platform isn’t for just anybody.

How To Apply

Create a startup profile on AngelList’s website and start kissing angel investor butt! (Or use any other technique you find effective)


AngelList is a more freewheeling platform than some of the others discussed here, and the complexities involved in working out deals with investor syndicates may seem daunting to the first-time entrepreneur. However, AngelList has an excellent public reputation and is highly rated by those who have used the platform to conduct equity raises, many of whom have used multiple equity crowdfunding sites.

Visit the AngelList website



WeFunder (see our review) differs fundamentally from the other services I’ve mentioned. Every site I’ve mentioned thus far deals in Title II crowdfunding (accredited investors only) and not Title III (anyone can invest). Wefunder, founded in 2012 and based in Cambridge, MA, is the most successful crowdfunding platform to use Title III equity crowdfunding, or Regulation Crowdfunding. In fact, with over $50 million raised thus far, Wefunder comprises 50% of the market share in the Regulation Crowdfunding industry.

Best For…

Of the 174 companies that have been successfully funded through Wefunder, the company states that “Most are alumni of Y Combinator.” That should tell you something about the sort of company to whom Wefunder is best suited. The rare startup with exponential growth potential stands a decent chance of finding funding through the platform. Other businesses may have a tougher time of it. I’ll note that tech and food companies seem to comprise the majority of funded startups on Wefunder.

Only US corporations and LLCs can use Wefunder for crowdfunding.

Products Offered

Wefunder offers the use of its equity crowdfunding platform through which you can raise anywhere from $20,000 to $1,070,000. You’ll have to pay a $195 fee before you can start crowdfunding, and if you’re successful in reaching your funding goal (Wefunder is an all-or-nothing crowdfunding site), Wefunder will take 7% of what you raised as a platform fee. Take that into account when setting your funding goal.


There are no particular requirements for joining Wefunder. The company prescreens applicants for fraud and to make sure your startup complies with the rules, but that’s about it.

How To Apply

Go to Wefunder’s website, sign up and fill out your business profile, and wait to hear back from the company.


Wefunder is the industry leader in Regulation Crowdfunding and can take the right kind of high-growth startup to funding success. Regulation Crowdfunding hasn’t yet been the boon some hoped it would be, but Wefunder is one of the few companies thus far to truly make it work.

Read our full Wefunder review

Visit the Wefunder website



SeedInvest (see our review) was founded in 2012 just as the JOBS Act was being signed into law. In fact, founders Ryan Feit and James Han were part of the movement to get the Act passed in the first place. Like Wefunder, they offer Regulation Crowdfunding, opening up investing to the masses.

Best For…

By their own estimation, SeedInvest has approved only 1% of the companies who have applied to use their platform. SeedInvest is an exclusive platform and they don’t care who knows it. Tech companies seem to dominate the list of offerings on SeedInvest’s site.

I’ll note that while many crowdfunding sites refuse to have anything to do with cannabis-related companies, SeedInvest appears not to be one of them. “Green” startups, take note!

Products Offered

Wefunder offers up the use of its equity crowdfunding platform to the lucky few who survive the vetting process. Per the FAQ, this is what SeedInvest offers to those who get through:

  • Simplify and speed up your fundraising process
  • Access a network of accredited investors from around the world
  • Host virtual fundraising sessions from your desk
  • Streamline investor pitches, execution of legal documents, and processing of investments

Unfortunately, SeedInvest’s fees are complex and depend on your specific offering type:

  • 7.5% placement fee; charged on the total amount raised on SeedInvest in the round, paid only upon the successful completion of your offering.
  • 5% warrant coverage or equity; based on the total amount raised on SeedInvest in the round.
  • Up to $0 – $10,000 in due diligence, escrow, marketing and legal expense reimbursements.

Though the fees are considerable, one advantage of SeedInvest is that you can raise up to $30 million on the platform.


SeedInvest doesn’t lay out specific criteria for making it onto its site, but remember that only 1% of applicants survive SeedInvest’s extreme vetting process. You’d better have done your homework!

How To Apply

Go to SeedInvest’s website, sign up for an account, fill out your project information, and wait to see if you’ll be accepted into the 1%.


To state the obvious, SeedInvest isn’t for everybody. Only the startups with the highest growth potential need apply. If this is you, SeedInvest may be worth investigating.

Read our full SeedInvest review

Visit the SeedInvest website


microventures review

Founded in 2009 and based in Austin, MicroVentures (see our review) is another example of a Regulation Crowdfunding platform. You should know what that is by now if you’ve been paying attention!

MicroVentures states that “(t)he sweet spot for our platform is companies or startups that need $150,000 to $1,000,000 in capital.” Thus far in their lifetime, MicroVentures has facilitated the raising of over $100 million for high-growth startups. Let’s take a closer look at them.

Best For…

According to MicroVentures, the following industries are its main areas of investment:

  • Internet technology
  • Media and entertainment
  • Software
  • Green technology
  • Mobile
  • Social
  • Gaming

MicroVentures goes on to describe the sort of company that best fits the platform:

MicroVentures looks for businesses that have a unique idea or a new spin on an old technology. We review the team, traction, market size and other factors to determine if the company will be a good fit for our platform. Additionally, we believe in accountability to the business (or concept), which is one reason we seek to identify firms whose founders already have invested their own capital in their business.

Products Offered

MicroVentures offers equity crowdfunding with the following fees:

  • $99 application fee
  • $250 due-diligence fee
  • 5% of what you raise

MicroVentures is an all-or-nothing crowdfunding site. If you raise some money but fail to meet your funding goal by the time your campaign ends, you’ll get nothing and like it.


MicroVentures doesn’t spell out any specific requirements to meet in order to be approved to start crowdfunding, but they do state the following:

We review every company that is submitted but we are only able to respond to the ones that we think will be successful on our platform. This is less than 5% of the companies that submit so please include as much detail as possible for us to evaluate.

So, 5% of applying businesses get through. That’s better than SeedInvest’s 1%, but it’s still a high bar to clear!

How To Apply

Sign up for a MicroVentures account, fill out the application for an offering, and submit it.


MicroVentures has a solid reputation in the industry. They offered investments in Facebook and Twitter before each went public. For the 5% of startups that, in MicroVentures’s estimation, have that kind of growth potential, this equity funding site holds great promise indeed.

Read our full MicroVentures review

Visit the MicroVentures website

Final Thoughts

Equity crowdfunding has only been around for a few years. Suffice to say, it is a work in progress. If you play your cards right, however, it might be just the thing to take your startup to the next level. If you’ve done your due diligence in preparing your offering and you possess the ability to excite investors, professional and amateur, then it’s certainly an avenue worth exploring.

The post The 7 Best Equity Crowdfunding Sites For Businesses And Entrepreneurs appeared first on Merchant Maverick.


6 Platforms That Do Crowdfunding For Nonprofits

nonprofit crowdfunding

The crowdfunding industry continues to grow and expand as a means of soliciting donations, product sales, and investment, so it’s only natural that nonprofit organizations are looking to get into the crowdfunding game. In taking advantage of a crowdfunding platform’s fundraising and social media tools, nonprofits can bring their message to a much wider (not to mention younger) swath of the population than would otherwise be possible.

However, it’s not a simple matter of picking from a list of interchangeable platforms and getting started. Not all crowdfunding websites are created equal. Some crowdfunders are purely for creative/business projects and cannot be used for nonprofit fundraising, while other platforms specifically cater to the nonprofit market. Some platforms don’t let you collect the money you raise unless you hit your funding goal amount, while others let you keep whatever you raise regardless. Some platforms charge a percentage of what you raise as a fee (and some charge more if you fall short of your funding goal), while others charge a flat monthly fee to use their services. Some platforms facilitate the giving of rewards to your donors, while others do not.

Point being, your choice of a crowdfunding platform matters. We here at Merchant Maverick want to help you cut through the dizzying array of crowdfunding sites available by highlighting the crowdfunders best suited for nonprofit fundraising.

A Warning Before You Begin

It’s vitally important that you familiarize yourself with the laws regulating nonprofit fundraising in the state or states in which you will be operating. You may well have to register your charitable nonprofit with the state before you begin soliciting donations. If you’re looking to crowdfund for your nonprofit and you’re confronting these questions for the first time, I recommend starting by checking out the information provided by the National Council of Nonprofits and going from there.

It’s easy to find yourself unwittingly running afoul of fundraising laws if you’re unaware of them, so take caution!

1. GoFundMe

GoFundMe (see our review) is best known for hosting campaigns related to personal medical expenses and other tragedies. That’s what has propelled GoFundMe to become the world’s top crowdfunding platform in terms of dollars raised (more than 5 billion and counting). What’s less well known is that GoFundMe hosts nonprofit crowdfunding campaigns as well. On the subject of nonprofit campaigns (referred to as Certified Charity campaigns), GoFundMe states the following:

Certified Charity campaigns can be created by anyone, whether you’re a good samaritan wanting to support your favorite charity or an employee of a non-profit. A ‘Certified Charity‘ badge will appear on the campaign to give your cause an extra layer of verification.

Donations made to Charity campaigns are processed through PayPal Giving Fund, a 501(c)3 public charity (Federal Tax ID: 45-0931286). The Campaign Organizer doesn’t have to touch the money at all, and donors will automatically receive a tax-deductible receipt.

In order to launch a Certified Charity campaign, the outfit you’re fundraising for must be a 501(c)(3) US-based nonprofit organization. It must also be registered in PayPal Giving Fund’s database. If your 501(c)(3) nonprofit isn’t in this database, GoFundMe outlines how you can rectify that here. And if your nonprofit is based outside the US, GoFundMe asks you to contact them to discuss your options.

GoFundMe’s Certified Charity campaigns carry with them a 5% platform fee on the money raised. While GoFundMe eliminated their 5% platform fee for their US-based personal campaigns in late 2017 (and has subsequently expanded that policy to Canada and the UK), the platform fee still applies to nonprofit campaigns. Now, given the current trend in crowdfunding (and with GoFundMe in particular), I wouldn’t be surprised if GoFundMe eliminated the platform fee for its Certified Charity campaigns sometime in the future. For now, however, the 5% platform fee remains.

In addition to the platform fee, a 2.9% + $0.30 processing fee will apply to each donation made. Therefore, a total fee of 7.9% + $0.30 will be taken from each donation.

GoFundMe provides the following primer for those interested in starting a crowdfunding campaign for a nonprofit organization. Check out our full GoFundMe review for more information.

2. YouCaring

YouCaring is another crowdfunding site specializing in personal and charitable fundraising campaigns. Having facilitated over $900 million in donations since its founding in 2011 — and having recently acquired Indiegogo’s charitable crowdfunding spinoff Generosity — YouCaring’s profile is rising as a cause-oriented crowdfunding platform. Thankfully for you, they host nonprofit crowdfunding campaigns as well as campaigns for individuals.

YouCaring has one big advantage going for it vis-à-vis GoFundMe. Unlike their larger competitor, YouCaring charges no platform fees to the crowdfunding campaigns it hosts, including nonprofit campaigns. That’s 5% more funds going to your charity — not too shabby. Just keep in mind that you’ll still be paying 2.9% + $0.30 per transaction to the payment processor. You can use PayPal (see our review) or WePay (see our review) for payment processing, though YouCaring recommends WePay.

One drawback of using YouCaring compared to GoFundMe, however, is the fact that with YouCaring, your donors won’t automatically get tax-deductible receipts. The nonprofit in question will have to do this themselves by collecting their donors’ contact information through YouCaring.

While YouCaring doesn’t have as much nonprofit-specific information on their site as does GoFundMe, they do include this guide for setting up a WePay account under your nonprofit organization.

3. Razoo

Since its founding in 2006, Razoo (see our review) has been something of an all-of-the-above crowdfunder, hosting crowdfunding campaigns for nearly any cause under the sun: business crowdfunding, personal crowdfunding, team crowdfunding, and, yes, nonprofit crowdfunding. Recently, however, they seem to be paying special attention to capturing more of the nonprofit crowdfunding market.

In order for your nonprofit to directly raise funds on Razoo, it needs to be registered as a 501(c)(3) public charity in the US. However, if your organization doesn’t yet have 501(c)(3) status or is based outside the US, you may still be able to use Razoo for fundraising. To do this, you’ll need to find an organization willing to act as your fiscal sponsor. Razoo provides information as to how to do this here.

Razoo charges a standard nonprofit crowdfunding campaign 4% off the top as a fee, with an additional 2.9% + $0.30 per donation going to the payment processor. A standard Razoo nonprofit campaign will be paying slightly less in fees than a GoFundMe campaign. However, Razoo has recently unveiled a new feature exclusively for nonprofits: premium subscription plans that eliminate the 4% Razoo transaction fee and give your nonprofit unique fundraising software through which your organization can run a totally branded crowdfunding campaign.

Here are Razoo’s three nonprofit premium plans and their respective details:


  • $99/month, billed annually
  • No platform fees
  • Unlimited P2P & Team pages
  • Priority support
  • Donor analytics
  • Advanced CRM tools
  • Donor data collection
  • Data Connect integration
  • Branded donation page, donation receipts, and donation widget
  • Volunteer management


  • $249/month, billed annually
  • All of the above, PLUS:
  • Pro CRM tools
  • Advanced donor data collection
  • Email messaging
  • Branded P2P fundraising
  • Advanced white label controls
  • Custom subdomain


  • Contact Razoo for pricing
  • All of the above, PLUS:
  • Domain masking
  • Custom events
  • Dedicated project manager
  • Fundraising coaching

These aren’t cheap packages, so if you’re considering going this route, it’s best if you have some experience with nonprofit fundraising and have a reasonable expectation of funding success. If you do, these premium nonprofit packages offer a pretty compelling deal. Your organization will be able to host its own crowdfunding campaign — one operating under its own brand, not that of Razoo. Plus, you’ll have access to the advanced campaign features listed above.

Donors who contribute to nonprofit campaigns will immediately be emailed a receipt which can be used to claim a deduction on their taxes.

Read our full Razoo review to learn more.

4. FundRazr


Declaring themselves “Canada’s leading crowdfunding platform”, FundRazr (see our review) has facilitated the raising of over $116 million USD in their near-decade of existence. FundRazr hosts crowdfunding campaigns for personal causes, business causes, and, yes, nonprofit organizations. The company also has a great reputation among both campaigners and donors. In fact, FundRazr is one of the few crowdfunding outfits that proudly links to its Trustpilot page. That should tell you something.

FundRazr goes into exactly who can raise money on their site for a nonprofit organization here. Essentially, if you’re not an Authorized Officer of the organization in question, you’ll need to submit a Letter Of Subordination that expressly authorizes you to fundraise on behalf of the organization.

A nonprofit fundraising campaign on FundRazr will have to contend with fees equal to those of GoFundMe. There’s a 5% platform fee and a 2.9% + $0.30 payment processing fee. Sorry!

FundRazr doesn’t give a great deal of guidance for nonprofits looking to use their platform, so if you represent a nonprofit, you’ll want to get in touch with the company to iron out the details. One thing I can tell you, however, is that PayPal and WePay (available in the US, UK, and Canada only) are your options for payment processing.

Read our FundRazr review to get the full story.

5. CrowdRise

For most of its existence, following its founding in 2010, CrowdRise was a crowdfunding platform for both personal causes and charity/nonprofit fundraising. However, in early 2017, CrowdRise was acquired by GoFundMe. CrowdRise now directs all would-be personal campaigners to GoFundMe while focusing solely on crowdfunding for nonprofit organizations.

CrowdRise details the following requirements for using their services:

In order to become a CrowdRise nonprofit, [an organization] must first be a registered 501c3 in good standing with the IRS or a Canadian charity in good standing with the CRA, and have a valid listing on GuideStar (US) or Canada.Ca (Canada).

CrowdRise is somewhat similar to Razoo in that you can set up a crowdfunding campaign for free and pay a transaction fee on what you raise or you can spring for a paid subscription that reduces (or eliminates) the transaction fee and gives you access to special fundraising features. Here are the details on CrowdRise’s offerings:

Starter (the free-to-start no-subscription package)

  • 6% platform fee, 2.9% + $0.30 payment processing fee
  • Essential fundraising tools
  • Two active campaigns
  • Registration integrations
  • Recurring donations
  • Basic campaign theming
  • Email support
  • On-demand training resources


  • Contact CrowdRise for subscription pricing
  • 3% platform fee, 2.9% + $0.30 payment processing fee
  • All of the above, PLUS:
  • Unlimited active campaign pages
  • Custom branded URLs
  • Registration and ticketing
  • Custom transactional emails
  • Configurable donate forms
  • Text-to-donate
  • API access
  • Google Analytics integration
  • Salesforce integration
  • Fundraising minimums
  • Phone support with 24-hour response time
  • Success strategist and annual review
  • Live, web-based setup and training


  • Contact CrowdRise for subscription pricing and fees
  • All of the above, PLUS:
  • Complex campaign structure
  • Parent/child level campaigns
  • Adjustable donor fees
  • Phone support with 4-hour response time
  • Premier account management
  • Live setup, training and success planning
  • Success resources w/ live assistance
  • Quarterly success review

It’s unfortunate that CrowdRise doesn’t just list the pricing for premium plans on the website. Still, you get the idea. Pay a monthly fee, and you’ll get the platform fee reduced and gain access to special features you can employ in the course of your crowdfunding campaign.

At first glance, CrowdRise’s standard nonprofit crowdfunding campaigns don’t look too appealing, what with that 6% platform fee and the payment processing fees. However, when a donor pledges to a campaign on CrowdRise, they’re given the chance to cover these fees themselves — and, according to CrowdRise, most donors do just that. CrowdRise states that on average, 98% of funds donated to causes go to the campaigner due to this policy. If true, this is a very competitive rate indeed!

6. FirstGiving

FirstGiving is a fundraising platform wholly devoted to nonprofit crowdfunding. It’s somewhat similar in structure to CrowdRise in that you can fundraise for a nonprofit freely without a subscription or get a subscription which gives you access to more advanced features.

According to FirstGiving:

All donations made through FirstGiving are processed through our charity partner Global Impact, a 501c3 nonprofit, and are fully tax-deductible to the full extent of the law.

No word on whether donors get sent a tax-deductible receipt or not.

Without a subscription, one can launch a crowdfunding campaign for “any of the 1.5 million nonprofits in the US” A “performance fee” of 5% and a credit card processing fee of 2.5% apply to what you receive; however, as with CrowdRise, donors are given the option of covering these fees when they donate, and FirstGiving estimates that 45% of donors do so.

As for the paid subscription packages, here’s what FirstGiving has to offer. Unfortunately, you’ll have to contact FirstGiving to get pricing estimates.

FirstGiving Pro

  • For small- to medium-sized nonprofits
  • Branded fundraising pages
  • P2P and event registration
  • Event management
  • Corporate gift matching
  • Comprehensive reporting
  • GiftWorks Cloud integration

Artez Enterprise

  • For large nonprofits
  • Fully customized fundraising and event pages
  • Built-in coaching tips
  • Predictive suggested donation amounts
  • Mobile optimized donation forms
  • Monthly giving programs

A Note Regarding Indiegogo

If you’ve cruised the internet looking for crowdfunding platforms that cater to nonprofits, you’ve probably seen Indiegogo (see our review) listed as one such platform. However, this was before Indiegogo sold its charitable crowdfunding division, Generosity, to YouCaring. As of March 2018, you can no longer launch a nonprofit crowdfunding campaign with Indiegogo.

Final Thoughts

Crowdfunding for nonprofits isn’t as straightforward as crowdfunding for a business or for a personal cause. Thankfully, modern crowdfunding platforms make it easier than ever to navigate the legal complexities to help nonprofits raise money, whether you’re an officer of the nonprofit or not. Just be careful and make sure you’re doing everything by the book!

The post 6 Platforms That Do Crowdfunding For Nonprofits appeared first on Merchant Maverick.


The Best Specialty Crowdfunding Sites

specialty crowdfunding

By now, if you keep up with developments in the business world (or if you’ve had to raise funds for a loved one in need), you’re likely familiar with crowdfunding giants like Kickstarter (see our review), Indiegogo (see our review), Patreon (see our review), and GoFundMe (see our review). The biggest crowdfunding platforms also tend to have the most marketing resources at their disposal, so it’s little wonder if you’ve heard of them and not their smaller competitors.

Big crowdfunders have their places, but it’s high time some of smaller, more specialized crowdfunding sites out there got a little attention. Many such platforms are aimed at a particular slice of the crowdfunding market and may be better suited to your particular cause than some of the more general-purpose crowdfunders.

Let’s explore some of the specialty crowdfunding sites that can help you raise money for your distinct needs.

Small Business & Startup Crowdfunding



Fundable (see our review) is a business crowdfunding platform with a particular appeal to small businesses and startups that have exponential growth potential. With Fundable, a company can launch a rewards crowdfunding campaign or an equity crowdfunding campaign…or even both!

Fundable won’t let you run a rewards campaign and an equity campaign simultaneously, but if you play your cards right, you can use a successful rewards campaign to demonstrate the strength of your startup to investors and begin a successful equity campaign. (Read my article on the differences between equity crowdfunding and “traditional” crowdfunding for more information.)

Fundable is more exclusive than many other crowdfunding platforms and must approve your Company Profile after you’ve finished filling out your company information on their site.

Fundable doesn’t charge a percentage of what you raise as a fee, departing from the practice of such crowdfunding platforms as Kickstarter and Patreon, which charge 5% each. Instead, Fundable charges a flat rate of $179/month. For the underresourced startup, this monthly fee is a substantial barrier to entry — particularly as the fee must be paid regardless of whether your campaign is successful. For the small business that expects success, however, this fee policy can be a boon. Consider the startup that successfully raises $50K in a 60-day campaign. $358 is a lot less than $2,500 (5% of $50K)!

You will, however, have to contend with payment processing fees. For its rewards campaigns, Fundable takes 3.5% + $0.30 of each transaction to cover payment processing. There are no such fees associated with Fundable’s equity campaigns because those campaigns do not involve online payment transfers — all payments are made offline.

Like Kickstarter, Fundable has an all-or-nothing funding policy. If you don’t reach your funding goal by the time your campaign ends, you don’t get anything. Something to keep in mind!



Wefunder (see our review) is another crowdfunding platform that specializes in business funding. Unlike Fundable, it is exclusively an equity crowdfunding site. And while Fundable’s equity campaigns only allow you to fundraise from accredited investors (a term that essentially refers to rich people), Wefunder’s equity campaigns take advantage of Title III of the Jobs Act of 2012 to offer equity crowdfunding for non-accredited investors (often referred to as Regulation Crowdfunding). What this means is that Wefunder lets you raise equity from anybody and everybody, just as you can raise money from anyone with rewards crowdfunding.

Wefunder is the largest Regulation Crowdfunding platform in existence, currently comprising 50% of the market share.

Wefunder takes a more relaxed approach to letting companies use their platform than does Fundable. Wefunder doesn’t do any prescreening, so there’s no initial bar to clear. Once you’ve started, Wefunder charges an initial non-recurring fee of $195 to launch your funding campaign. They then charge, in their words, “up to a 7% fee” of what your raise in a successful campaign. Conducting a Regulation Crowdfunding raise with Wefunder means accepting this relatively onerous fee policy. Payment processing fees are paid by the investors.

Like Fundable, Wefunder’s crowdfunding campaigns employ the all-or-nothing funding model, so if you take your business fundraising idea to Wefunder, you’d better have a detailed plan of action and the means to follow through on it. If your campaign doesn’t live up to its billing and you don’t reach your goal, no funding for you.

Medical Crowdfunding

When it comes to crowdfunding to pay for medical expenses, GoFundMe receives the lion’s share of attention. A recent NerdWallet study found that $930 million of the $2 billion raised on GoFundMe during the time period studied went towards medical campaigns. However, as I documented in my GoFundMe review, quite a few campaigners have had serious issues with the company and its practices. Let’s take a look at some GoFundMe alternatives for those Americans (curiously enough, it’s just about always Americans) seeking to crowdfund their medical expenses or those of a loved one.


Of all the crowdfunding platforms focused on human need, YouCaring is probably the most well-known of the non-GoFundMe crowdfunders. How does YouCaring stack up?

GoFundMe recently garnered some good press by eliminating its 5% platform fee for campaigns based in the US and Canada. YouCaring does them one better: Its campaigns have no platform fees no matter where the campaigner is based. Both platforms do, however, take 2.9% + $0.30 out of each donation to cover the cost of payment processing while asking donors to voluntarily contribute money to the platform to help keep it going.

One thing that comes across when perusing user reviews of YouCaring is that its customer service is second to none — the level of responsiveness described is unusual for a crowdfunding site. YouCaring offers real-time chat support and personalized coaching that helps guide users through the crowdfunding process.

YouCaring has facilitated the raising of $900 million since its founding in 2011, so it has an established track record of success. The site is definitely worth exploring if you or someone close to you needs help with medical expenses.


GoGetFunding is another crowdfunding platform focused on personal crises like medical episodes (though they let you crowdfund for any and all causes). You can raise funds in 23 currencies with GoGetFunding.

In one respect, however, GoGetFunding has fallen a bit behind the times. In its FAQ, GoGetFunding proclaims that its platform fee of 4% is “lower than all of our major competitors.” Now, this may have been true when written, but it is no longer true. If you take a trip down memory lane, you’ll recall that I mentioned that YouCaring and GoFundMe have no platform fees. (With all due respect to GoGetFunding, 4% is not lower than 0%.)

Beyond the 4% platform fee, 2.9% + $0.25-$0.30 per transaction is taken by the payment processor — roughly the same payment processing fees as GoFundMe and YouCaring.

Anyone choosing GoGetFunding over its immediate competitors is accepting the 4% fee, so let’s see what you get for that money. GoGetFunding lets you add team members to your crowdfunding campaign if you want to make your campaign a team effort. You also get PayPal support, a personal fundraising coach, and PR to help promote your campaign to the media.

Crowdfunding For Filmmakers


Seed&Spark is a crowdfunding platform devoted to funding the production of movies and shows. Not only that, but the rate of funding success for Seed&Spark projects is 75%, which (Seed&Spark claims) beats all other competitors in this particular field — a claim that seems to have been corroborated by a blogger.

Seed&Spark’s fee policy is unique in the industry. Seed&Spark takes 5% of donations — the same rate as Kickstarter — but offers backers the chance to cover that fee at checkout. According to Seed&Spark, a majority of backers do so. In addition, the platform charges 2.9% + $0.30 for payment processing (same as most competitors). Combine this with the fact that, according to Seed&Spark, filmmakers take home an average of 95% of what they raise, and it appears the average platform fee paid by Seed&Spark creators is 2% — not bad at all for a non-personal crowdfunder!

Seed&Spark’s funding model is a hybrid of the all-or-nothing approach favored by Kickstarter and the keep-what-you-raise approach adopted by other crowdfunders. With Seed&Spark, you get to keep what you raise only after reaching 80% of your funding goal.

Once you’ve had a successful campaign and you actually complete your movie or show, you can even choose to have it distributed by Seed&Spark. If you do, the revenue will be split 60/40, with the creator getting 60%. Subscribers to Seed&Spark will then be able to stream your movie or show at seedandspark.com as well as on Apple TV and Roku through Seed&Spark’s app.


Slated is an equity crowdfunding platform devoted to movie production. Launch a Slated project and you’ll be marketing your film concept to a select crowd of accredited investors, many of whom work in the film industry (producers, writers, directors, actors, etc.). In fact, according to Slated, 68% of the films appearing at Sundance in 2016 and 54% of 2016’s Oscar-nominated films were made by Slated members. Using Slated is a way to get exposure for your project among the very people in the industry who matter.

With Slated, all funds are transferred offline — not great for convenience, but it means you won’t be paying any fees on what you earn.

The platform is free to use, but if you want any real likelihood of meeting your goal, you’ll want to use Slated Analytics’ Script Analysis service. Use this service and three Slated members — industry insiders with experience doing exactly this — will pore over your script and assess its screen-worthiness. Only one of the three pros who read your script has to give it a passing grade for it to earn an official recommendation. Your score will prove vital to your ability to attract investors and secure funding. The script analysis costs $395 per draft, while the combined script and financial analysis package will set you back $995.

Crowdfunding For Musicians


PledgeMusic is a crowdfunding platform for musicians. It gives bands and other performers the ability to get their music funded, connect with their fans, and offer exclusive content. According to PledgeMusic’s FAQ:

“You can run a project around your new album or EP, a book, a DVD, a concert tour…anything you’re doing, as long as it’s centered around music!”

In addition to being a crowdfunding platform, PledgeMusic also hosts your music. This may explain why PledgeMusic takes a sizable 15% cut of what you raise in a successful campaign (thankfully, you won’t have to cover the payment processing costs). Furthermore, PledgeMusic is an all-or-nothing crowdfunder. You’ve got to hit your funding goal before you receive anything.

PledgeMusic will work with you in designing your campaign and in tweaking the look of your store page. The platform is designed to allow you to offer both digital downloads (tracks, albums, etc.) and physical products like instruments, backstage passes, and swag.


ArtistShare is a crowdfunding platform so old that it predates the term “crowdfunding.” Founded in 2001 and launched in 2003, ArtistShare was the first “fan-funding” site for creative artists.

ArtistShare is much more of an exclusive club than the other crowdfunding sites I’ve covered in this article. The company must pre-approve you before you can raise funds on the site, and judging by the artists on the platform, ArtistShare favors polished jazz and classical musicians.

ArtistShare takes 5% of what you raise in fees. They take an additional 3-5% for payment processing fees.

ArtistShare’s funding model isn’t quite all-or-nothing and it isn’t quite keep-what-you-raise either. With ArtistShare, if you don’t hit your funding goal, you will only receive funds from backers who clicked the “Unconditional Support” option when making their contribution. Thus, if your project doesn’t reach its goal, you’ll still get some funding, but you won’t get everything that was pledged.

Final Thoughts

If crowdfunding makes sense for your particular situation, there’s no reason you have to follow the herd and go with the big boys. There are plenty of specialty crowdfunding sites out there, only a few of which I’ve covered here. You may find that a niche crowdfunding site can offer you particular benefits — benefits you might not get with a more general-purpose crowdfunder.

The post The Best Specialty Crowdfunding Sites appeared first on Merchant Maverick.


8 Ways To Finance Your Small Business

Business financing is often a necessary part of growing a business, but when it comes to finding capital, it can be difficult to know where to start. Should you get a credit card? What about a loan from your local bank? Is there useful financing out there that you haven’t even heard of?

Read on, and we’ll point you in the right direction. This article discusses the most common (and some less common) ways of getting financing for your business. And, if you find the right type of financing for your business, we’ll give you the next steps to continue your search.

Want help finding a business loan? Apply now to Merchant Maverick’s Community of Lenders. We’ve partnered with banks, credit unions, and other financiers across the country to bring you fast and easy business financing.

1. Business Loans

As you might expect, business loans are one of the most popular and versatile ways of financing your business. Most businesses will qualify for a business loan of one sort or another, and they can be used for many business purposes, from working capital to business expansion to refinancing.

Business loans come from many different places. While everybody knows that you can get a business loan from a bank, you might not be aware that other financial institutions offer business loans. Many offer loans that are easier to qualify for and have faster applications than bank loans. Here are places that commonly offer business loans:

  • Banks and credit unions offer business loans and other types of financing.
  • Nonprofits, not-for-profit institutions, and microlenders offer small business loans and other types of financing to create jobs and fuel community growth.
  • The Small Business Administration partners with financial institutions to offer business loans. Read more about SBA loans in our guide to their programs.
  • Online lenders, also called “alternative lenders,” offer business loans and other types of financing with fast, semi- or fully-automated application processes.

Loans come in many different forms. The most common are installment loans, in which the money is granted to the business in one lump sum and then repaid via incremental, fixed, payments. However, some loans might have special fee and repayment structures — you might find loans with fixed fees (like short-term loans), loans that have repayment rates based on the percentage of money you make every day or month, or other arrangements. In other words, with a little looking, most merchants will be able to find something that is suited to the needs of their business.

For more information on small business loans, check out our free Beginner’s Guide to Small Business Loans. Or, to read reviews of individual lenders, head over to our small business loans review category.

2. Business Lines Of Credit

Business lines of credit are a sort of hybrid between business loans and credit cards. Like business loans, with a line of credit, you can borrow a sum of money which is (normally) repaid along with interest in installments over a set period of time. Like credit cards, you can request funds at any time, up to your available credit limit.

If you occasionally need funds to make ends meet or grow your business, or you simply want a safety net in case of emergencies, a line of credit is an excellent tool at your disposal.

Credit lines can be especially useful to businesses on a timeline because you don’t need to apply every time you need to borrow funds. When you are approved for a credit line, you’re granted access to a certain amount of money from which you can draw at any time. If you have a revolving line of credit, the amount you can borrow will replenish as you repay outstanding debts.

Some credit lines, such as asset-backed lines of credit, can work a little differently. If you have access to a credit line secured by unpaid invoices, inventory, or other assets, the amount you can draw at any given time will depend on the value of the assets you have outstanding. These credit lines are normally best for B2B businesses.

Credit lines carry a few drawbacks — most credit lines have variable interest rates, which mean that your rates might change without notice. And, if you aren’t very good at managing money, you might find that you don’t have emergency funds when you need them. However, lines of credit are useful tools for many businesses.

In the past, it was difficult for all but the most well-established and prosperous businesses to get credit lines. With the advent of online loans, it’s becoming easier for businesses of all sizes to access this useful financing tool. Check out our guide to business lines of credit for more information, or, if you’re interested in procuring one, take a look at our favorite line of credit services.

3. Business Credit Cards

There are many reasons to get a business credit card for your business.

For starters, most credit card issuers offer rewards and benefits to merchants who have signed on with their services. By using the card, you could be earning savings in the form of cash back points (that can be redeemed for travel or other expenses). These rewards add up in the long run, and you might be able to save your business quite a bit of money. Additionally, many credit card issuers offer benefits to cardholders, such as extended warranty, price protection, roadside assistance, and other perks.

Credit cards are also convenient ways to keep track of expenses and smooth out cash flow. If you put all your purchases on your credit card, you can easily see what you’ve been spending money on and where you might be able to cut costs. Because the money isn’t coming out of your own account right away, you can defer payments until a more convenient date. You don’t have to struggle to come up with money for expenses if you don’t have it at the moment, or it would be more convenient to pay later.

Of course, credit cards do have some downsides: the APRs can be expensive, so if you don’t pay your bills in time you could wind up with hefty fees that can be difficult to pay off. Additionally, some credit cards carry extra fees, like annual fees and balance transfer fees, which could eat into the money you save by using the card in the first place. However, if you are good at managing money, and spend time choosing a card that will maximize your savings based on how much you plan to utilize the card, credit cards can be excellent tools for many businesses.

Interested in getting a business credit card? Check out a list of our favorite business credit cards. Or, if you are starting a business, you might be interested in our favorite personal credit cards that can be used for business.

4. Merchant Cash Advances

If you need a one-time amount of funds, it might be worth considering a merchant cash advance. This type of financing can be useful for B2C businesses with strong daily sales.

In practice, merchant cash advances are similar to business loans, with the exception of how they’re repaid. Cash advances are repaid by deducting a small percentage of your daily sales; the amount you are repaying each day will vary along with your cash flow. These financial products don’t have a set repayment date, but are normally repaid in a year or less.

Merchant cash advances are an excellent tool for B2C businesses that need a small infusion of cash for working capital, business growth, or other reasons. Know, however, that cash advances have a few downsides: they can be very expensive, and the cost might not be immediately apparent because the fee structure is different than a traditional loan. Instead of interest, cash advance fees are calculated using a factor rate, which can obscure the true cost of the advance.

Head over to our comprehensive article on merchant cash advances for more information, or take a look at our reviews of merchant cash advance providers if you’re interested in finding an advance.

5. Personal Loans

While business loans are based on the credibility and strength of your business, personal loans are based on your personal creditworthiness and financial health. For this reason, these loans can be useful for entrepreneurs, startups, and other businesses that don’t yet have a credit history. You’ll want to give this option a pass if you have separated your business and personal finances, but if you’re not there yet, a personal loan can help you get your business up and going.

Personal loans are normally available from banks, credit unions, and online lenders. You’ll have to have a steady source of income, a solid debt-to-income ratio, and fair credit to qualify for reasonable rates.

Take a look at our guide to personal loans for business for more information, or check out our startup business loan reviews for reviews on personal lenders.

6. Crowdfunding

Rising to prominence due to the internet and some changes in legislature, crowdfunding allows you to finance your business via a network of your peers.

Crowdfunding is normally used by entrepreneurs to get a startup off the ground, or by creators who need money to fund a product. In a crowdfunding arrangement, the entrepreneur creates a campaign, which usually includes a description of their business or product, information about the founders and their partners, a rough timeline, potential problems, and other frequently asked questions.

Perhaps the most well-known type of crowdfunding, popularized by services such as Kickstarter (read our review) and Indiegogo (read our review), is rewards crowdfunding. You may not be aware that there are actually quite a few different type of crowdfunding available:

  • Rewards crowdfunding, from services like Kickstarter and Indiegogo, allows contributors to receive products in exchange for backing the business or project.
  • Donation crowdfunding, on sites like Razoo (read our review), involves funds that are donated to your cause. This type of crowdfunding is typically only used for nonprofits or other charitable projects.
  • Debt crowdfunding, from services such as Kiva U.S. (read our review), works similarly to a business loan — backers contribute money with the expectation that it will be paid back, normally with interest.
  • Equity crowdfunding, from company’s like Fundable (read our review), works when backers contribute money in exchange for equity in your business.

Between all the different types available, most entrepreneurs should be able to find a type of crowdfunding that will suit their business or project. Some less-than-sexy businesses, however, might find that they have trouble appealing to casual investors. While debt and equity crowdfunding — which tends to attract more serious backers — might solve that problem, some businesses might still need to look at other financing options.

Crowdfunding also tends to take a long time. Typically, the entrepreneur has to create a campaign and enter into a one- to three-month funding period. The funding period might require a fair amount of marketing, networking, communicating with current and potential backers, and other work to get your project funded.

Interested in crowdfunding? Head over to our startup business loans review category to read reviews of crowdfunding services.

7. Invoice Factoring

Invoice factoring is a financial solution for B2B businesses that invoice their customers. If you have cash flow struggles due to slow-paying customers, invoice factoring is a potential solution. Factoring is commonly used in industries such as construction, manufacturing, printing, and other B2B businesses.

Invoice factors purchase your unpaid invoices at a discount. While you’ll have to take a bit of a loss, invoice factoring can get you the money you need, when you need it, to keep your business going.

When you sell an invoice to a factoring company, you will receive most of the money up-front, and the factor will place a small amount on reserve. Then, when your customer pays the invoice, the funds are diverted to the factoring company, and you will receive the rest of the money in the reserve, minus the invoice factor’s fee.

There are many invoice factoring arrangements, depending on the factoring company and the needs of your business. You can find factors that require you to sell a lot of invoices or ones that let you pick and choose more carefully. Some factors require that your customers know about the arrangement, while others will keep it a secret, and so on.

Invoice factoring has gotten a bad rap in the past because some factoring companies employed poor practices, such as failing to disclose extra fees, requiring long-term contracts and monthly minimums, and other reasons. However, if you do your due diligence, you will be able to find an invoice factor that suits your business’s needs without employing poor tactics. Check out our Basic Introduction To Invoice Factoring to learn what to look for, and take a look at our comprehensive invoice factoring reviews to learn about individual factors.

8. Equipment Financing

If you run a business that relies on computers, manufacturing equipment, restaurant equipment, vehicles, or other equipment that might be difficult to pay for out of your business’s own pocket, equipment financing might be right for you.

Equipment financing covers two types of financing: equipment loans and equipment leases.

Equipment loans are similar to traditional business loans, but the equipment is generally used as collateral. In a typical equipment loan arrangement, the lender will cover 80% to 90% of the equipment, and you will be responsible for paying the other 10% to 20%.

Equipment leases are arrangements in which you rent the equipment for a certain period of time. In practice, some lease arrangements are similar to loans, because you have the opportunity to buy the equipment at the end of the leading period, but other arrangements are designed so that you can return or trade in the equipment after a certain period of time. Because you don’t have to purchase the equipment, leases can be a good option for businesses that only need equipment for a short time, or frequently need to upgrade expensive equipment (like computers) due to changes in technology.

Equipment financing, especially equipment loans, will most likely be more expensive in the long run than purchasing the equipment outright. However, if you can’t afford what you need, an equipment loan or lease is an excellent way to get financing.

Head over to What Is Equipment Financing? to learn more about this type of financing, or our equipment financing review category to learn about individual financiers.

Final Thoughts

Business owners have many financing tools at their disposal, but finding the right tool for the job can take some work. The above resources will point you in the right direction.

Need some more help? Merchant Maverick’s Community of Lenders is there for you. We’ve teamed up with banks, credit unions, and other financiers across the country to provide our readers with fast and easy business financing. With one short application, you can check your eligibility for all participating financial institutions. Read more about the service, including a step-by-step guide through the application process, in Mirador Finance & Merchant Maverick: Making Small Business Loans Easier.

The post 8 Ways To Finance Your Small Business appeared first on Merchant Maverick.


Crowdfunding For Startups: 8 Tips For Launching

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startup crowdfunding

For a people who revere startup culture and the idea that one can bootstrap one’s way to business success, we seem to prefer the TV version to the real thing — especially as of late. It turns out that new business creation recently approached its 40-year low. Banks are retaining their Great Recession-era tight-fistedness and the costs of education, housing and healthcare continue daily to expand beyond the ability of most Americans to keep pace. Frankly, our veneration of the entrepreneurial spirit does not appear to extend to supporting policies that would actually increase people’s ability to take the financial risks required to start their own business.

Due to these factors — along with the legalization of equity crowdfunding accomplished via the passage of the JOBS Act in 2012 — crowdfunding has arisen as a means of raising startup funds. You may only be familiar with crowdfunding in the context of all the medical- and disaster-based campaigns that have been making the news lately, but crowdfunding is a viable way to raise money for businesses as well.

The fact is, for the right kind of new enterprise, a crowdfunding campaign can be a great way to raise a much-needed initial infusion of capital. The biggest crowdfunding site for startups, Kickstarter (see our review), has seen over $3.4 billion USD raised by product-oriented business projects. To be fair, this money didn’t just fall into the laps of the startups in question. Crowdfunding takes some work to get right. However, it’s hard to imagine that the campaigners who raised that $3.4 billion could have raised that same sum via conventional means.

Just know that you’ll have a lot of competition for those crowdfunding dollars. You need to go into it with more than just a good story (not to discount the value of a good story!) — you’ll need to tailor your campaign to suit your particular enterprise, and you’ll need to give your potential backers a personal stake in supporting you with the promise of rewards, profit, or both.

Here’s what you should do to prepare before you begin.

Table of Contents

1) Learn Which Type Of Crowdfunding Suits You Best

If you know anything about non-charitable crowdfunding, you’ve likely heard of Kickstarter and its rewards-based crowdfunding model. What you might not be aware of is that Kickstarter is but one method of crowdfunding available to startups.

Rewards Crowdfunding

Rewards crowdfunding is what most people think of when they hear the term “crowdfunding.” Along with Kickstarter, Indiegogo (see our review), Patreon (see our review), and GoFundMe (see our review) are examples of popular platforms offering rewards crowdfunding. I’ll get into the differences between these platforms later on, but suffice it to say, these platforms generally involve raising money from The Crowd in exchange for rewards that are directly related to your startup’s mission. The platform will then take a cut of what you raise (except in the case of GoFundMe).

Equity Crowdfunding

Equity crowdfunding is a different beast entirely. The field of equity crowdfunding is a new one. It was legalized by the JOBS Act, which was signed into law in 2012 and whose provisions have gradually taken effect over the last few years. The JOBS Act was seen as a way to facilitate greater access to capital in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis.

Equity crowdfunding differs from traditional rewards crowdfunding in that instead of backing a project in exchange for exclusive illustrations or a gadget or tickets to a performance, backers become investors who receive an ownership stake in the company. Investing is much more heavily regulated than rewards crowdfunding, so it’s a more legally complex way of raising funds than using Kickstarter. What’s more, the JOBS Act provides for two similar yet distinct forms of equity crowdfunding: the type in which you raise money from accredited investors only (which basically means rich people) and the type in which you can raise money from non-accredited investors (everyone else). Most equity crowdfunding platforms, including Crowdfunder (see our review) and Fundable (see our review), offer equity crowdfunding for accredited investors only, while a few upstart companies like Wefunder (see our review) offer equity crowdfunding for all (sometimes referred to as Regulation Crowdfunding).

Debt Crowdfunding

Debt crowdfunding, like equity crowdfunding, involves investing in a security of the company in question. However, with debt crowdfunding, the investor is a lender who gets paid back on a fixed schedule with interest. From the perspective of a startup, getting into debt crowdfunding means you’re borrowing money — not from a bank, but from a crowd of investors. Kiva U.S. (see our review), Lending Club (see our review) and Prosper (see our review) are all prominent debt crowdfunding outfits.

If you’re wondering which of these three types of crowdfunding best fits your startup, here’s a quick rundown for you:

  • Rewards crowdfunding is best suited to startups in the business of producing content for people to consume. Artists, gadget makers, podcasters, filmmakers, and board game producers have all made good use of rewards crowdfunding.
  • Equity crowdfunding makes sense for startups with exponential growth potential that do not produce a singular product or experience to share with a crowd of backers.
  • Debt crowdfunding is for startups that need cash for a defined purpose and that have the ability to pay back the loan.

For more information on the subject, I recently wrote an article comparing and contrasting these three types of crowdfunding. Check it out!

2) Research Different Platforms To Understand Their Differences

Simply knowing the difference between the three varieties of crowdfunding doesn’t provide enough information for you to settle on a platform. For one thing, crowdfunders like Indiegogo and Fundable offer both rewards and equity crowdfunding. For another, the terms, fees, content policies, and even the structure of the crowdfunding campaigns themselves differ from platform to platform.

For instance, you might be trying to raise funds to build your own board game company and have your sights set on Kickstarter. However, Kickstarter is a more exclusive platform than most rewards crowdfunders — it might not accept your campaign proposal. What’s more, you might find Kickstarter’s all-or-nothing funding policy intimidating. With all-or-nothing funding, if you raise less than your stated goal amount during the length of your campaign, you get nothing at all. You might find a platform like Indiegogo more to your liking, as Indiegogo accepts any campaign that doesn’t violate its rules while allowing you to collect whatever you raise with your campaign regardless of whether you’ve hit your goal.

Let’s say you’re an artist collective seeking to put on monthly art exhibitions. The Kickstarter/Indiegogo fundraising-for-a-one-time-event model of crowdfunding may not be for you. You might find Patreon to be a better fit. With Patreon, backers (or “patrons”) sign up to support you on an ongoing basis, either per month or per creation. You won’t have to gin up a new crowdfunding campaign every time you want to start a big project.

Likewise, equity crowdfunders vary greatly in their policies — SeedInvest (see our review), for example, boasts of only accepting 1% of those who apply to crowdfund on its site, whereas EquityNet (see our review) accepts any startup applying to use its services.

3) Check Out Other Crowdfunding Campaigns To See What Works (And What Doesn’t)

When you’re raising money via crowdfunding, you have one big advantage over those trying to raise money via other means. If you’re applying for a bank loan, you don’t get to browse through every loan application ever submitted to the bank or view the result of every application. But with crowdfunding, in most cases, the data is there for everyone to see!

Kickstarter is typical for a crowdfunding site in that every campaign ever posted to its website is left up permanently, regardless of whether the campaign succeeded or not. For the creator whose ridiculous campaign never really got off the ground, this permanent record of failure may not seem like such a boon. However, if you’re a startup looking to identify patterns in past crowdfunding campaigns that correlate with success — as well as patterns that correlate with not-success — this data is quite valuable indeed. I would strongly advise you to make use of it! Don’t be too proud to emulate what has been shown to work.

4) Be An Intensive Self-Promoter

If you’re the modest, retiring sort who spurns self-promotion, get ready to change your approach  — that is, if you want your campaign to succeed. Spend some time promoting your startup’s cause before taking the crowdfunding plunge (Indiegogo recommends at least two months of prep time before launch).

Do the legwork necessary to build up your social media following before starting your crowdfunding campaign, so that when you launch your campaign, you’ll have a built-in audience that is already receptive to your message. Contact journalists who cover your field. Build an email list. Consider buying ads on Facebook or Twitter to promote your campaign. Unfortunately, with crowdfunding as with so much else in our fallen world, you have to spend money to make money.

Remember to tailor your self-promotional efforts to fit your audience. If you’re looking to conduct business with accredited investors, a hard-nosed, data-focused approach may bear more fruit than a flashier look-how-cool-we-are campaign.

5) Create A Professional Video

I suppose I could have included this point in the previous section, but I think it deserves to be emphasized on its own. According to Kickstarter, posting a video to go along with your campaign increases your likelihood of ultimately succeeding from 30% to 50%.

Here’s another example of “spend money to make money” — a professional video with decent production values will make your potential backers more confident in the potential of your enterprise than something produced on the cheap. I’d love to live in a world where one could devote all one’s energies towards their true passions and not have to set aside time and resources for salesmanship, but we don’t live in that world. So, make a video. Keep it to just 2-3 minutes. You can get personal, but make sure to hit all your main points about your startup and its potential. Don’t forget to mention the benefits backers stand to earn!

6) Get Commitments From Backers Before Launching Your Campaign

It might not be fair, but it’s not easy to attract backers when your campaign first launches. An adverse first impression can easily dissuade someone from contributing to your campaign, and seeing “$0 pledged” next to your project can be enough to cause a prospective backer’s wallet to close. That’s why it’s important to line up commitments from backers before your campaign launches.

Time to make your family and friends prove their love to you by securing their backing before your campaign goes live! Gather commitments from your followers as well. Remember how I mentioned that you should build an email list of potential backers? Here’s where you can put that list to good use. Email your followers immediately when your campaign goes live. Get some pledges early and it will be all the easier to get subsequent commitments from backers. Data provided by Kickstarter backs this up — while their overall project success rate is just a hair under 36%, projects that raise over 20% of their goal have a 78% success rate.

7) Don’t Be Afraid To Use Analytics

The use of analytics is the only way you’ll be able to tell just what kind of traffic to your campaign page is converting to pledges. Use whatever analytical tools are available to see where your pledges are coming from and how you can boost them.

For instance, Kickstarter’s Project Dashboard gives you access to a trove of data regarding exactly where your backers are coming from. This data is invaluable when determining where you should focus your marketing.


8) Stay In Touch With Your Backers

Show your backers that you respect them by staying in touch with them. Keep them updated on your progress. After all, these are people who made a financial commitment to you knowing that there’s no guarantee that your plans will come to fruition.

Monitor social media chatter related to your campaign to see if particular concerns pop up repeatedly. If so, do what needs to be done to address these concerns. After all, you’ll want to stay in their good graces if you want to launch another crowdfunding campaign in the future!

Final Thoughts

Crowdfunding doesn’t work out for every startup that tries it. If you do your due diligence, however, you greatly increase the likelihood that your campaign will reach its funding goals. Follow these tips, and you’ll have a fighting chance to get the funding you need so that you can ultimately focus on growing your startup, not on fundraising!

Jason Vissers

Jason Vissers is a writer, cereal chef and Netflix aficionado from San Diego. A native Californian who enjoys the beach, Jason nonetheless prefers to do his surfing on the World Wide Web, the raddest wave of them all. Jason can’t eat raisins.

Jason Vissers


5 Patreon Alternatives

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patreon alternatives

For a wide array of podcasters, YouTubers, writers, journalists, artists, comedians, and other creatives, Patreon (see our review) has provided a convenient means of monetizing output that was previously unavailable. Patreon’s conception of crowdfunding, based as it is on ongoing donations from patrons in exchange for exclusive content, is well-suited to those who produce works that people enjoy but who previously had no means by which to get compensated for their toil.

However, if you’re on the lookout for an alternative to Patreon (as are many Patreon creators ever since Patreon introduced — and then rescinded — their unpopular new fee policy), there are several other good options. Let look at some of them!

Table of Contents

1. Kickstarter

I’m sure I don’t have to explain to you what Kickstarter is. You’re also likely aware of the fact that Kickstarter (see our review) crowdfunding campaigns do not operate on Patreon’s recurring subscription-like model. However, if you’re a creator whose focus is on putting out, say, a few major works per year — as opposed to a continuous stream of content — Kickstarter may work for you. You can always launch a new Kickstarter campaign after your old one runs its course.

Kickstarter vets crowdfunders fairly strenuously, so not everyone gets in. It’s a more exclusive platform than most of its rewards crowdfunding peers, which is a factor to consider if you’re a small-time creator. But with nearly $3.5 billion in dollars pledged to Kickstarter campaigns — and over 136K successfully-funded projects — Kickstarter’s track record is nothing to sneeze at.

One thing to keep in mind about Kickstarter campaigns is that the funding is all-or-nothing. If you don’t raise your goal amount within the time frame you specify (anywhere from 1 to 60 days), you get nothing — no soup for you. Launching a Kickstarter campaign requires a certain degree of confidence in your ultimate success.

As for fees, Kickstarter and Patreon don’t differ a great deal in this respect. Both Kickstarter and Patreon take a 5% cut of what you earn, with payment processing fees taking upwards of 3% of the rest.

2. Indiegogo

Indiegogo (see our review) is another alternative consider, and while it has a lot in common with Kickstarter, there are some key differences.

Like Kickstarter, Indiegogo crowdfunding campaigns are not continuous and have concrete start and end dates. Unlike Kickstarter, however, Indiegogo doesn’t pre-screen the campaigners who sign up to crowdfund, making it a less exclusive platform for creatives. Indiegogo also gives you the choice of whether you want your campaign to be all-or-nothing or keep-whatever-you-raise in its structure. With the latter, you won’t be left with nothing if your campaign fails to reach its funding goal.

The maximum campaign length with Indiegogo is 60 days. Indiegogo’s fee structure is nearly identical to that of Kickstarter and Patreon — 5% to the platform, ~3% to the payment processor.

Think of Indiegogo as a slightly more relaxed Kickstarter.

3. Donation Buttons

Here’s a crowdfunding solution that ensures you won’t have to pay a 5% platform fee to anybody: You can just directly solicit donations from those who enjoy your work. Payment providers like Stripe (see our review) and PayPal (see our review) have buttons you can place on your site for just this purpose.

These payment providers allow people to make recurring payments, so your fans can sign up to support you on a continuing basis (just as with Patreon). Of course, you won’t be getting any of the extra crowdfunding services you’d get with Patreon (reward distribution, patron management, analytics, etc.), so this funding solution will require more of your time and energy than Patreon. Then again, you’ll get more of every pledge made to you. If you have an existing fanbase motivated to pay up for your content and the ability to manage everything manually, this may be a crowdfunding route worth exploring.

Now, let’s take a look at a few crowdfunding sites that share Patreon’s subscription-based crowdfunding model.

4. Podia

Formerly called Coach, Podia isn’t one of the better-known crowdfunders out there — in fact, they’re new to the crowdfunding game, having just launched their new Patreon-like Membership service a few weeks ago (I’m writing this in December 2017). Prior to this, the site — then known as Coach — was simply a service with which people could sell online courses and digital downloads as standalone purchases.

Podia is keen to invite comparisons between themselves and Patreon — in fact, they’ve put up a page on their site devoted to showcasing themselves as a superior Patreon alternative. Their main selling point is this: Podia charges no fees on the donations your contributors make. Instead, you pay a flat monthly fee to use the service. You’ll have to pay $79 per month for the Membership package and $39/month if you just want to sell online courses/digital downloads and use Podia’s email marketing services. If you can draw a significant monthly income from selling access to your work, you’ll be paying less in fees with Podia than with Patreon. However, if you pull in just a few hundred bucks a month or less, Podia is clearly not a more cost-effective crowdfunding service than Patreon. It all depends on the level of support you get from your followers.

5. Memberful

Memberful is a decidedly different way to make money from your work. It’s not a crowdfunding platform, but rather a plugin you install on your website through which you sign people up for subscriptions to receive exclusive content. You can set up the application to accept subscriptions for different lengths of time (monthly, yearly etc.) and for different subscription plans that give access to varying levels of content.

If you sign up for Memberful’s Starter plan, you won’t pay any monthly fee, but Memberful will take a whopping 10% of what you earn — and that’s before you get to the payment processing fees. Memberful’s Pro and Enterprise plans cost $25 and $100 per month (respectively) while cutting the platform fee down to 2% and 1% (respectively). Both give access to features like coupon codes and newsletter integrations. Memberful isn’t a funding solution for everybody, but for the right sort of creator, it may be worth checking out.

Coming Soon: Drip

I would be remiss if I didn’t mention Kickstarter’s new Patreon-like subscription-based crowdfunding platform, Drip. Drip is still invitation-only at this point, so we’re still waiting for a proper release. However, given that it has the weight of Kickstarter behind it and is clearly Kickstarter’s response to Patreon’s popularity, I expect it to become Patreon’s main rival when it becomes open to everybody. Details are scarce at this point, but Drip promises to integrate with Kickstarter so the 13.7 million backers currently on Kickstarter can use their login details and payment info to start backing Drip projects without having to set up a new profile. They also promise that Drip campaigns will feature a “founding membership period” during which backers will be designated “founding members” and get special perks for jumping in early. It’s an intriguing way to get people motivated to support you during your campaign’s early days.

Few details are available, but when Drip is released to the general public, I’m going to try to be the first person to post a review of it. Stay tuned!

Final Thoughts

Monetizing your work online has long been a challenge. Thankfully, platforms like Patreon and its various alternatives have arisen to plug this market inefficiency and help creators make money from the very people who consume and enjoy their content. No single solution is right for everybody, so check out these platforms (heck, check out other ones too if you want!) to determine which funding model makes sense for your particular needs.

Now go forth, create, and get paid!

Jason Vissers

Jason Vissers is a writer, cereal chef and Netflix aficionado from San Diego. A native Californian who enjoys the beach, Jason nonetheless prefers to do his surfing on the World Wide Web, the raddest wave of them all. Jason can’t eat raisins.

Jason Vissers


10 Tips For Building A Winning Patreon Campaign

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patreon success

It used to be that if you wanted to try crowdfunding as a means of monetizing your physical and/or creative output, you had to set up a campaign on a site like Kickstarter (see our review) or Indiegogo (see our review). That’s all fine and good — after all, these sites have raised billions in funding for creative business ventures of all kinds. But what if you want to crowdfund on a continuing basis and have your fans support you with monthly (or per creation) payments? Platforms like Kickstarter aren’t set up to facilitate that — not until Drip becomes open to all, at least.

Enter Patreon (see our review). Patreon enables you to draw an ongoing income from The Crowd by soliciting donations from patrons on either a per-month or per-creation basis. It’s an ideal crowdfunding model for podcasters, YouTubers, musicians, journalists, artists, and anyone else who creates content on a regular basis and would like to be compensated for it.

Just remember: Crowdfunding isn’t Field Of Dreams, and you’re not Kevin Costner. If you build it, they won’t necessarily come. You have to go in with the mindset that building up your Patreon is a job and your patrons are customers who will require content of value in return for their investment. Rewards crowdfunding isn’t charity — it’s business, albeit with a strong human element.

Here’s what you need to do to ensure you have the best possible chance at Patreon success.

(If you are, in fact, Kevin Costner, I apologize.)

Table of Contents

1. Have An Existing Fan Base

Some people may see popular Patreon creators who pull in several thousand dollars a month and come away thinking that Patreon built their fan base. This line of thinking gets it backward. Patreon is just a platform for your work — it’s not going to generate interest in what you do if the interest isn’t there in the first place!

A successful Patreon campaign requires that you have a base of potential patrons — not necessarily a huge base, but one that exists — who are already inclined to support you financially in exchange for access to your content. In reality, the path to being a winning Patreon creator starts long before you sign up with Patreon. Typically, people don’t browse randomly through Patreon creator pages looking for unknown creators to support. They seek out the campaigns of creators they already know and appreciate.

Before you start with Patreon, acquire a following of people who are willing to drop at least a dollar or two per month on your content. Otherwise, you’ll just be wasting your time.

2. Post A Video. Be Concise!

Building a personal connection with your followers is key in inducing them to open their wallets for you. There’s no more direct and efficient way to bolster this connection than with a killer video.

Don’t use your video to appeal to the consciences of your fans and plead for support on moral/charitable grounds. Regardless of the merits of such a case, it just doesn’t work. Approach your introductory video as if you were making an elevator pitch to investors because essentially, that is what you’re doing.

Appear personally in your video. Be passionate and sincere. Make sure to explain how the rewards system works and what patrons will receive at different tiers of support — some of your followers likely don’t know how Patreon works. Also, don’t post a video longer than three minutes (or so). People’s attention spans aren’t getting any longer.

gamer chair GIF

Nobody’s going to expect to see a video with Hollywood-level production values. Just be direct, sincere, and explain exactly what patrons will get in exchange for their support.

3. Examine Other Patreon Campaigns

If you’re trying to raise money by applying for a bank loan, you don’t get to study the loan applications of other applicants to see what works and what doesn’t. Crowdfunding platforms, however, are much more transparent. With Patreon, you can check out every active campaign on the site, along with the number of patrons each has acquired. And while creators don’t have to make their monthly (or per-creation) earnings public, about half of them do.

This is tremendously valuable information! Before you launch, do your homework and study the Patreon campaigns of other creators in your field. Take note of what characteristics successful campaigns have in common, along with the commonalities between campaigns that generate less interest.

This campaign data is too valuable to go unexamined. Take advantage of it!

4. Set Goals

With Patreon, you don’t have to set funding goals, but I highly recommend it. When you set a goal, you’re telling your patrons that you’ll be able to complete a certain project or make some campaign-related purchase once you’ve hit a certain level of funding. It’s both a way to demonstrate that you aspire to grow your operations and a way to inspire more patronage by letting people know what they stand to gain should your goals be met.

You can set as many goals as you like, but stick with a few at a time so as to not inundate people with information. Once you reach a goal, consider setting a new one so you’ll always have a few goals laid out in front of you. These goals can serve as inspiration for both you and your patrons.

5. Create Several Reward Tiers

In general, it’s a good idea to offer some kind of reward to patrons at the $1-$2 subscription level to appeal to the broadest possible swath of the populace. Many people divide their support among numerous Patreon creators at $1-$2 per month/creation, and you’ll want to appeal to this type of subscriber. However, you also want to set higher reward tiers for the bigger spenders, because a certain percentage of your supporters — and it can be a small percentage — will likely jump at the chance.

Patreon has posted data indicating that as your number of reward levels increases, so too does the chance that you’ll process at least $100 in your first month.

The key is to offer your potential patrons several options for supporting you in exchange for rewards so as to appeal to both the big spenders and the small spenders. Offer a lil’ something for everybody.

6. Promote Your Patreon On Social Media

If you have a social media presence and you’re not using it to promote your Patreon, you’re doing it wrong. People who know you and are familiar with what you do are more likely to support you. This goes back to my first point regarding tapping your existing followers for support.

You might be a bit squeamish about annoying your social media followers with requests for crowdfunding support. Do it anyway! Otherwise, you’re effectively leaving money on the table. Plus, if your campaign is unique or unusual enough, it might just go viral, thus getting you all the more attention — and more attention leads to more patron moolah!

7. Be Mindful Of Shipping Costs When Offering Rewards

It’s great to offer cool rewards, but if you’re not careful about who you’re offering physical rewards to, you could end up blowing your budget on shipping costs. This is particularly true if you have lots of overseas backers.

hovering stop motion GIF by Reuben Armstrong

Make sure that the rewards you offer at lower levels of support are either digital in nature or are the sort of thing that can be sent in a simple envelope. If you’re sending packages overseas to people who support you at $5/month, you may well find yourself in deep doo-doo.

8. Create Continuously

This one may be a bit obvious, but it’s true — particularly if your Patreon campaign offers per-month subscriptions. If your content releases are few and far between, patrons are going to realize they’re not getting much bang for their buck.

If you’re focused on offering major works a few times a year, platforms like Kickstarter and Indiegogo are probably better suited to you. Patreon’s crowdfunding model requires that you continuously release bits of content on a regular basis. If you’re building up to publishing a novel or something along those lines, you can always launch a Kickstarter/Indiegogo campaign and run it alongside your Patreon campaign.

9. Keep Creating Things For Non-Patrons

If you’re earning Patreon money for your work, that’s great. Just don’t make all your content exclusive to patrons. You want to continue to grow your casual audience and spread awareness of your work in order to expand the pool of people inclined to become a patron of yours in the future, and you can’t do that if you put everything behind the paywall.

Freebies make for good patron-bait. Give people just enough to leave them wanting more.

10. Send Patrons Personalized Messages (Particularly When Starting Out)

It always helps your cause to make your patrons feel loved and wanted, and while it may not be possible to send personalized thank-you messages to your every patron once you’ve hit it big, it’s definitely worth doing when you’re starting out. Patrons may feel like they’re taking a chance on you in your early days, so why not go the extra mile to thank them for having faith in you?

Show patrons some extra TLC when you’re starting out, and they’ll be more likely to stick with you. It’s just common sense.

Final Thoughts

It would be nice if good content sold itself. Unfortunately, with Patreon, just as in meatspace, this just isn’t how things work. You’ve got to be methodical and strategic when devising your Patreon campaign if you want to draw significant funding. Most people don’t have the disposable income to support every creator they like just out of the goodness of their hearts. You have to make your patrons feel emotionally invested in your success while simultaneously offering them tangible benefits in exchange for their patronage.

Remember, your followers don’t owe you anything. They’re struggling too! However, if you can enrich their lives with engaging content while making them feel as though they have a stake in your success, your Patreon campaign can be a winning proposition for everybody.

Jason Vissers

Jason Vissers is a writer, cereal chef and Netflix aficionado from San Diego. A native Californian who enjoys the beach, Jason nonetheless prefers to do his surfing on the World Wide Web, the raddest wave of them all. Jason can’t eat raisins.

Jason Vissers


The Debate Over Patreon’s New Fee Policy: Who Benefits, And Who Doesn’t?

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patreon fees

When Patreon (see our review) announced a change in their fee structure, they touted it as a way to ensure that creators were paid a greater portion of what is pledged to them. However, many in the global creative community immediately perceived it as a threat to the viability — and thus the livelihood — of smaller creators on the site. What are the motives behind this change, and what will be its effect?

Table of Contents

The Change: Payment Processing Fees Will Now Be Assessed To Patrons

The simple way to summarize the change is to say that the payment processing fees charged in the transfer of funds from patron to creator will now be charged to the patron (rather than to the creator, as was the case in the past). But this broad explanation glosses over the specifics of how patrons will be charged, and it’s these specifics which lie at the heart of the issue.

Prior to December 18, 2017 — the day the new fee regime takes effect — Patreon’s policy was to charge the content creator for the cost of payment processing, deducting the amount from the earnings, which were bundled together and paid out once per month. This amount would vary, both month-to-month and creator-to-creator, because it depended on the number and amount of the individual pledges you received from your patrons, not the sum total of your patrons’ contributions.

As of the 18th, this all changes. Creators won’t be charged a fee for payment processing, and will instead pay only the 5% platform fee Patreon has always charged. Patrons will now be charged a 2.9% + $0.35 fee on each individual pledge they make to a Patreon campaign.

To those not involved in crowdfunding, the significance of this change may not be immediately apparent, and, in fact, it was initially presented by Patreon as an unalloyed good. According to the company’s much-criticised first statement, the change was made because it “allows Patreon creators to take home exactly 95% of every pledge, with no additional fees.”

However, here’s the thing. To charge a 2.9% + $0.35 fee to a patron’s every individual pledge adds a significant burden to patrons, most especially those who contribute a small amount — often $1 — to several different creators.

Seriously, though, it’s a big hit to small contributions! You might see the 2.9%, or even the $0.35, and think “well, that doesn’t sound like a big deal.” But the truly significant part is that this fee is charged to your every individual pledge and not assessed to your total monthly donation. This means every $1 pledge you make to a creator — whether monthly or per creation — will cost you $1.38. That’s a 38% fee you’re now paying on your donation, which sounds a lot worse than “2.9% + $0.35.” So if you contribute to, say, 20 different Patreons at $1/month each, you’ll now be paying $27.60 instead of $20.

This issue is especially acute if you run a per-creation Patreon. According to their FAQ explaining the changes, Patreon states the following:

As a per-post creator, your patrons will see the 2.9% + $0.35 service fee added to all paid posts. For example, if you are a per post creator making two paid posts per month, your patrons will be charged 2.9% + $0.35 for each paid post.

This means your $1-per-post patron will be paying $2.76 over the month for $2 worth of content, and not the $2.41 that would be assessed if the patron’s per-creation charges were bundled by month and then had the fee assessed. This disparity gets more pronounced the more prolific the per-post creator.

For the patron, it’s the aggregation of the per-pledge fees that is so insidious. This is particularly the case if you divide your giving into small amounts sent to many different creators, and less so if you give larger amounts to fewer creators.

The Criticism

Backlash was swift and unforgiving, ricocheting remorselessly down the weary corridors of social media. Many creators recognized this change as a massive new disincentive for patrons to spread their wealth, in the form of small pledges, among many different campaigners, with the new payment regime incentivizing patrons to concentrate their giving to fewer creators. The primary beneficiary of this change, according to many, is Patreon itself, not the majority of creators (and certainly not patrons). Crystallizing this view, a recent VentureBeat article quotes indie developer George Buckenham as describing the change like so:

This especially disincentivizes people pledging single dollars per month to multiple creators, which I assume they factored in and are happy with, in favour of people backing fewer projects for larger amounts of money.

The effects of the change are already being felt. Many Patreon creators tweeted screenshots of the canceled pledges they had already experienced, often accompanied by patrons giving the new fee structure as their reason for cutting back. Artist Blue Delliquanti noted in just such a tweet that they had already lost the equivalent of the cost of their dental insurance.

Artist/writer Josh Fruhlinger responded to the change by offering his $2-level patrons the chance to resubscribe at $1.60 per month for a unique reward to induce them to stay while paying roughly the same $2 monthly rate. Again, Patreon made this change ostensibly to benefit creators, yet now we see creators effectively cutting their own take just to keep their patrons from fleeing.

Yet another oft-heard complaint was that this change would be especially hard on non-US creators and patrons, considering the extra costs per transaction already incurred with the currency exchange, VAT, etc.

The Response

After the first wave of reaction, Patreon issued a further explanation of their new fee system through their payments product manager. The statement is an emphatic denial that the move is profit-motivated — “This was never (and still isn’t) about making more money for Patreon as a company.” Instead, they link the change to a change in the way patrons are going to be billed in the future. The explanation is complex, and I had to read through it a few times before I really understood it, but it boils down to the fact that Patreon wants to offer all creators the ability to get paid up-front when patrons subscribe to their content. This option has often been requested by creators who have to deal with the possibility of patrons signing up for their content and then canceling before the first payment is made.

However, when they let certain creators use a “monthly-with-charge-up-front” charging method, patrons were miffed. Because a patron’s monthly subscriptions are bundled and paid on the first of the month, a patron who signs up to support a creator with charge-up-front enabled on November 29th is charged a full month’s fee immediately, and then again on December 1st for the next month’s content. To prevent patrons from being effectively double-charged like this, Patreon wants to change the payment system to one in which each patron’s monthly subscription is paid on the monthly anniversary of the date on which they signed up with the creator in question.

But if they do this without changing the way payment processing fees are charged, according to Patreon, the cost of these fees will shoot up for creators and take a bigger cut of their monthly takes, because their patron’s payments will be spaced out over the month and not bundled and paid on the first of the month as before. They therefore justify the new fee system as a way to prevent this scenario from happening. They also added the fact that this new 2.9% + $0.35 was the lowest of the fee amounts they had experimented with during testing. “Be grateful we’re not making it even worse!” they seem to be saying.

As you can imagine, this response was not universally accepted.

Reaction To The Response

Many in the creative community, like author Natalie Luhrs, did not accept that soaking small donations with such a steep fee increase was the only way to make charge-up-front charging work. Several people pointed to another aspect of Patreon’s new billing practices which wasn’t addressed by the company in their “here’s why we did this” response but is mentioned in the FAQ page they put up to detail the changes. As things stand now, creators who are patrons of other creators can pay said creators out of their Patreon balance to avoid subjecting the funds in their balances to a second round of fees. However, according to Patreon,

We will likely be changing the way creator to creator payments happen in the future so that you will no longer be able to use your Patreon balance. One reason is that it causes many edge cases that add complexity to our payments system as work to roll out charge upfront over the course of 2018.

Of course, in smoothing out these “edge cases,” Patreon will just happen to collect more in fees as a result.

The Motivation And The Effect

Naturally, opinions differ on Patreon’s true motivation for enacting these fee changes. Natalie Luhrs pointed to this article, from June 2017, in which a Patreon employee explicitly states that “financially successful Creators” are more valuable to the company than creators who earn less money (“We’d rather have our GMV [gross merchandise volume] be made up of fewer, but truly life-changed creators rather than a lot of creators making a few dollars.” is a rather telling quote.). Luhrs claims this is evidence that Patreon is intentionally trying to prioritize big earners over small-time earners on the platform. If this is the case, there is no small irony in the fact that Patreon’s highest-earning project — and therefore its most “financially successful” — is a socialist podcast that has come out swinging against the new fee policy.

Others point to different possible motivations. Developer Jason Yu theorized that the real reason behind the change was not Patreon’s desire to effectively gentrify the ranks of its creators but to minimize costly instances of patrons getting confused and disputing charges that they made because they didn’t realize they were being aggregated by Patreon — the example given was a patron who makes 20 $1 monthly contributions and disputes a $20 charge from Patreon because they don’t recognize it. (Jason nonetheless concludes that “Unfortunately for Patreon, they may find that this change only shifts payment fraud to other channels while angering their creators and patrons in the process.”)

The fact is that we don’t have access to Patreon’s internal deliberations, so it may not be possible to pinpoint Patreon’s exact motivations for making this move. However, we don’t need to know the motivations behind the move to objectively assess its effects. It’s clear that the fee changes, as proposed, will make the act of contributing small amounts of money to many different Patreon campaigns much more expensive in percentage terms. These new fees, at 2.9% + $0.35 per individual pledge, plainly incentivize patrons to concentrate their Patreon spending on fewer creators in order to cut down on the number of times they’ll be forced to pass these new virtual toll booths. This can only have the effect of shifting patron spending up the ladder, benefitting larger creators at the expense of the smaller ones. Chalk up a rare win for the beleaguered 1%!

Final Thoughts

Don’t hold me to this, but I suspect Patreon will survive the current controversy. The most popular creators will see a net increase in the amount of revenue they take in, as they’ll be able to count on getting 95% of what is pledged to them. Patreon will continue to grow, and they will point to this growth to retrospectively justify this month’s change in their fee policy. But the numbers won’t tell the whole story. Creators will be left having to hope that their increased cut will be enough to cover the losses incurred from other patrons dropping or reducing their support. On this count, the big, established creators are obviously better positioned than the small-time creators.

Wasn’t the original intent of rewards crowdfunding to give a leg up to these very same small-time creators? To help them get the recognition they deserve in a world increasingly dominated by those who can leverage their existing advantages for their enduring benefit? Patreon might see increased aggregate growth from this move, but at what cost to those who Patreon might not define as “financially successful Creators” who have been “truly life-changed” but who rely on the platform to earn a few extra bucks to help make ends meet?

We know that when questions of this nature are ignored, the result is a society ever more aggressively stratified by wealth and power, so perhaps it’s high time these issues were given the consideration they urgently require.

Jason Vissers

Jason Vissers is a writer, cereal chef and Netflix aficionado from San Diego. A native Californian who enjoys the beach, Jason nonetheless prefers to do his surfing on the World Wide Web, the raddest wave of them all. Jason can’t eat raisins.

Jason Vissers