Lowe’s Credit Card Review: All The Business And Personal Credit Cards Offered By Lowe’s

Does your business buy at Lowe’s frequently? Or perhaps you require a lot of hardware store shopping? Then one of the home improvement store’s branded credit cards may work for you.

With five options — all sharing the promise of discounted purchases — Lowe’s has built a strong stable of cards. Depending on your business, one may be right for you while other owners might pick something different.

Curious which Lowe’s card is right for you? Keep reading to find out!

Card Name Best For
Lowe’s Advantage Card Businesses that don’t need employee cards
Lowe’s Business Account Credit Card Small businesses
Lowe’s Accounts Receivable Business Credit Card Medium to large businesses
Lowe’s Business Rewards Card Businesses looking for a full credit card
Lowe’s PreLoad Card Businesses that don’t want to undergo a credit check

Lowe’s Advantage Card

Lowe’s Advantage Card


Lowe’s Advantage Card
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Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


26.99%, Variable

Technically a personal card, the Lowe’s Advantage Card is a simple store-branded card offered in conjunction with Synchrony Bank. This no-annual-fee card features a 5% discount on eligible purchases at Lowe’s. Note that the 5% discount cannot be used in tandem with coupons, price-matching, or various discounts, including military and employee.

If you’d rather have special financing instead of the 5% discount, Lowe’s offers two ways to opt out of the discount and into special financing. The first way lets you nab six months 0% APR on purchases above $299.

The second way enables you to receive special financing on purchases above $2,000. The APR changes based on how many payments you plan to make:

  • 36 fixed monthly payments at 3.99% APR
  • 60 fixed monthly payments at 5.99% APR
  • 84 fixed monthly payments at 7.99% APR

If you choose either financing option, the 5% discount will be voided. That means you’ll want to use a financing route only when necessary.

Beyond its benefits, this card can only be used at Lowe’s; you won’t be able to buy items from other stores. Additionally, its base APR is relatively high, which could be something to watch out for.

Lowe’s Business Account Credit Card

Lowe’s Business Account


Lowe’s Business Account
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Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


16.99%* or 21.99%**, Variable

Just like with the Advantage Card, Lowe’s Business Account Credit Card offers 5% off every eligible purchase you make at Lowe’s. However, unlike the Advantage Card, there are no financing options.

On the flip side, you do gain access to various cardholder promotions. There are also discounted delivery options for both in-store and online orders. As an additional bonus, you won’t need to worry about an annual fee.

Lowe’s further offers an online portal to view details about your account. This portal will let you pay online and view both prior statements and past activity. You’ll also be able to request credit line increases and download up to six months of account activity to Excel, CSV, QuickBooks, or Quicken.

Lowe’s Accounts Receivable Business Credit Card

Lowe’s Accounts Receivable


Lowe’s Accounts Receivable
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Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


5% – 18%*, Variable

Lowe’s Accounts Receivable Business Credit Card is very similar to the Business Account card; you’ll collect 5% off every eligible Lowe’s purchase without any special financing options. You’ll get some of the same benefits, too. These include cardholder promotions and discounted delivery on both in-store and online purchases. There’s also no annual fee.

Beyond the 5% discount, however, it does include a few more features. You’ll be able to establish and link accounts to one another in a secondary-parent relationship. You’ll further be able to request and manage authorized buyers, a solid extra for businesses looking to give cards to employees.

Lowe’s also sets you up with in-depth billing features. You’ll be able to track payments, view the details of transactions, and consolidate all statements for all linked accounts. The online portal further lets you request credit line increases and download up to six months of activity to Excel, CSV, Quickbooks, or Quicken.

Lowe’s Business Rewards Card From American Express

Lowe’s Business Rewards Card from American Express



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Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


17.99% – 26.99%, Variable

The only fully-fledged credit card on the list, Lowe’s Business Rewards Card from American Express offers a way to earn while spending at Lowe’s, as well as with other merchants. You’ll net three points per dollar spent at US restaurants and office supply stores, and on wireless telephone services purchased from US-based service providers. Lowe’s purchases collect two points per dollar while everything else scores one point per dollar.

Points earned with this card can be redeemed for either Lowe’s or American Express gift cards.

On top of the points scheme, you’ll still get the 5% discount when shopping at Lowe’s, discounted delivery, and bulk rate pricing. You’ll also net 5,000 bonus points when you spend $100 in your first 30 days. The card further offers no interest on purchases during your first six months.

There are standard credit card benefits, too. These include employee cards, extended warranty for up to two years, purchase protection against theft and damage, and travel insurance. This card comes with no annual fee, although foreign transactions tack on a 2.7% charge.

Lowe’s PreLoad Card

Lowe’s PreLoad Card


Lowe’s PreLoad Card
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Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


N/A (this is a pre-loaded card)

If you’re worried about a credit check, Lowe’s offers their PreLoad Card. This card requires no credit check when signing up. Note that this means it is not an actual credit card; instead, it’s a preloaded card that you top up by adding money to it via a debit, a credit, or a checking account.

Even though it’s not a credit card, you’ll still receive the 5% discount when you shop at Lowe’s. You can also issue cards to employees or subcontractors at any time. Money can be added to employee cards via an online tool that also tracks and allows you to budget employee spending.

While it doesn’t come with many of the standard credit card features, you will have access to Discover’s zero liability policy. This protects you against unauthorized charges when reported promptly.

How To Qualify For A Lowe’s Credit Card

For three basic store cards, you’ll likely want to have fair (also known as “average”) credit or better before applying. That means you’ll need to aim for a credit score of 580 or higher. The Rewards Card from American Express, meanwhile, likely requires a good score or better. For this card, shoot for a score of 680 or higher. The PreLoad card does not require a credit score.

Unsure of your credit score? Find out by visiting one of our favorite (and free!) credit-score-checking sites.

You’ll also need to be a US resident and at least 18 years of age. You can apply online and in-store.

Which Card Should I Get?

Lowe’s aims their cards at different types of customers. As such, what works for one business may not work for yours. Here’s a quick rule of thumb to help you decide:

  • If you are a very small business with no employees, then go with the Lowe’s Advantage Card.
  • If your business is slightly larger but doesn’t require your employees to have a store card, the Lowe’s Business Account Credit Card should be enough.
  • If your business is large enough that your employees need cards, then the Lowe’s Accounts Receivable Business Credit Card should work for you.
  • Businesses that are looking for a card that not only earns Lowe’s rewards but can also be used elsewhere will need to apply for the Lowe’s Business Rewards Card from American Express because that’s the only full-fledged card Lowe’s offers.
  • Businesses that want to avoid a credit check will need to sign up for the Lowe’s PreLoad Card.

The post Lowe’s Credit Card Review: All The Business And Personal Credit Cards Offered By Lowe’s appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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How To Build Credit With A Credit Card

As a business owner, having a solid credit history and a good credit score is important. Potential creditors will often use your credit history to consider if you qualify for a loan or credit card—both of which could be great tools to improve your business.

Unfortunately, life happens and you may find yourself with a weak credit history and a lower-than-desirable credit score. Luckily, not all hope is lost. With some smart moves, you’ll be able to turn your credit history around.

One of the most accessible ways to rebuild credit is with a credit card. Because there are plenty of cards aimed towards users with weak credit, you can obtain a line of credit with ease. Keep reading to find out how a credit card can help you!

Apply For A Secured Or Credit-Building Card

If you don’t have a credit history, or perhaps your score is low, getting a secured card or one designated for credit-building is a great option. While secured cards require a security deposit (usually several hundred dollars), you’ll be able to use them to build credit.

Plus, because these cards are targeted towards low-credit users, you likely won’t need to worry about having your credit card application rejected. Besides that, you normally shouldn’t have to pay an annual fee—meaning that improving your credit score won’t cost anything.

Among the top secured cards include Discover it Secured, Capital One Secured Mastercard, and Wells Fargo Business Secured Credit Card. If you want a more in-depth breakdown, check out our post on the best secured cards for small businesses.

Don’t Apply For Too Many Cards At Once

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Every time you apply for a credit card, the issuer will do a hard pull on your credit history. Each hard pull can impact your credit score. Too many in quick succession may drop it even further—something someone with an already low credit score should try to avoid.

This happens because creditors will see you attempting to open multiple lines of credit quickly. Doing so makes it appear possible that you are in desperate need of money — and therefore a risky candidate.

Only apply for a card you need and know you will get. After a few months, if you still need another card for whatever reason, then you can apply for a second card.

Keep Accounts Open

Even if you aren’t using a credit card, having an open account can still look good on your credit report. The longer you have an account open, the less risky you’ll appear to creditors. This is because they see your credit history as more predictable.

Additionally, closing an account lowers the average age of your accounts. This can damage your credit score because average account age makes up 15% of your FICO score, the primary credit score calculation used by many creditors.

So if you’ve signed up for a card to get the $200 bonus, keep the account open. Better yet, look for a card with an excellent bonus offer that you’ll actually use in the future. This way you’ll not only have a card with a longer history on your credit report, but you’ll also be consistently utilizing your line of credit.

Maintain A Low Balance

One of the most important factors that impact your credit score is credit utilization. You’ll want to only utilize up to 30% of your available credit. Ideally, you’ll keep the amount you utilize between 1% and 10%.

To determine how much you can spend, determine your card’s maximum credit line. Once you know that, plan to only spend up to 30% of that amount.

Additionally, around 30% of your FICO score is determined by how much of the credit line you use — that’s almost a third of your score! It’s vitally important to keep track of how much credit you’re utilizing—especially if you’re working on improving your score.

Make Timely Payments In Full

There are two very simple things you can to do improve your credit score with a credit card: make on-time payments and pay off the balance in full. A basic goal is to only buy when you know you’ll be able to pay. Instead of thinking of a credit card as “free money” or a loan, think of it like a debit card where you can only spend what you have in your bank account.

It’s also worth noting that if you make repeated late payments, your issuer may report you to credit bureaus. This will put a negative mark on your credit report, ultimately lowering your credit score even further. Plus, your payment history can make up to 35% of your FICO score. This means that making payments on time will positively impact your score more than other factors.

One way to make sure you always pay on time is to set up automatic payments. This way you won’t forget to pay off your balance. Of course, you will still need to make sure there’s enough money in your bank account so that your payment isn’t rejected.

Final Thoughts

Ultimately, building up your credit with a credit card is about diligence and patience—this won’t be something that changes overnight.

However, as long as you pick the right card for your business, spend smart, and stay on top of payments, your credit history should and improve and your score should rise. Once this happens, you’ll be able to apply for cards with better rewards and loans with more competitive rates, letting you focus on what matters: your business.

If you’re uncertain of what your credit score is, check out our list of the best free credit score-checking websites. Or perhaps you do know your credit score, but have spotted an error on your history. In that case, find out how to dispute this error.

Good luck!

The post How To Build Credit With A Credit Card appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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The Step-By-Step Guide To Starting And Funding A Cleaning Business

Entropy is a powerful force. If there’s one thing you can rely on, it’s that everything gets dirty sooner or later. If it doesn’t get dirty, it gets cluttered. Add in the increasing prevalence of two-income households, the pace of modern work, and long commutes and it’s not surprising that more and more people are letting their chores slide. And that’s not even taking into consideration the huge messes businesses make. The fields are ripe for the harvest — why not cut yourself a piece of the action and start a cleaning business?

Luckily, the overhead costs of starting a cleaning business are fairly low (at least up until you start adding staff). Still, you’ll want to have a good sense of what you’re getting into before you dive into the cleaning industry. It’s vital to have a plan to tackle the expenses and challenges you’ll encounter along the way.

Not sure where to start? We’ll break starting and funding a cleaning business into a step-by-step process below.

Make A Business Plan

What separates a business from a side gig? Well, a lot of stuff, but one of the bigger points of delineation is whether or not you have a business plan and a clear strategy.

Creating a business plan can be an intimidating prospect, but you don’t need to have a business degree to write one. You don’t even need to have taken a class.

A business plan is, essentially, an outline documenting what your business is, what it does, how it’s organized, its financial means, and a strategy for how you intend to grow.

There are a lot of resources online that can give you an idea of what a business plan looks like, as well as templates to help you get organized, but a typical business plan has the following parts:

  • Executive Summary
  • Company Description
  • Market Overview
  • Sales & Marketing Strategy
  • Operating Plan
  • Organizations & Management Team
  • Financials

Calculate Startup Costs

The good news about launching a cleaning business is that it’s possible to start one with relatively little overhead.

At a bare minimum, you’ll need cleaning supplies. This assumes you’ll be doing the cleaning yourself and aren’t taking on any additional employees right away. If you’re cleaning residential homes, these supplies will more or less be the same ones you use to clean your own home. If you’re getting into commercial cleaning right away, you’ll likely have to invest in equipment (and possibly personnel) that can handle larger volume messes and expansive spaces.

If you plan on cleaning as more than a side gig, you’ll also need to pay fees to register your business. This isn’t a very big expense if you’re content with running a sole proprietorship (or partnership, if you’re starting it with someone else) –usually less than $50. You can also file a DBA, which allows you to legally do business under another name (the name of your company). We’ll get a bit deeper into it in the next section.

Additionally, you should factor in any initial advertising costs, as well as transportation costs for getting yourself or your employees to the work sites.

Register Your Business

Registering your business may sound intimidating, but it can actually be one of the easiest parts of starting a business.

Why should you register your business? At minimum, it protects the name you’re using to do business so that no one else in your area can (legally) use it. It can also help you qualify for business-to-business services and services that require an EIN number.

Incorporating, on the other hand, is a more complicated and expensive process that comes with its own advantages and disadvantages.

Here are the most common types of businesses you can register as:

  • Sole Proprietorship: By default, this is the type of business you’re running when you initially create one. You and your business are, for tax and liability purposes, considered the same entity. In fact, if you want to do business under a name other than your own, you’ll need to file a DBA (doing business as) with your local county clerk.
  • Partnership: Essentially the same as a sole proprietorship, except you started it with one or more other people. By default, you’re each considered to own an equal share of the business for tax and liability purposes.
  • Limited Liability Corporations (LLCs): If you’ve seen LLC after a corporation’s name, you’re dealing with this type of company. LLCs offer limited liability protection for their owners without the full complexity of a corporation. Each state has its own rules for how to start and maintain an LLC, and you don’t necessarily have to register your LLC in the state where you’re doing business (although you’ll generally want to). LLC owners report their business earnings and losses on their personal taxes.
  • C-Corp: This is the “basic,” default form of incorporation. Shareholders are considered the owner(s) of the company and receive limited liability protection; however, the business decisions are made by corporate officers who may or may not be shareholders. The corporation is taxed separately and shareholders pay income tax on dividends. To form a C-corp, you’ll file articles of incorporation with your state.
  • S-Corp: S-corps are similar to C-corps in most ways, but come with a few additional restrictions: you must have fewer than 100 shareholders and they have to all be U.S. citizens or residents. Unlike C-corps, profits and losses are reported on personal taxes, not unlike an LLC. In addition to filing articles of incorporation, you’ll also need to file IRS Form 2553.

Get Business Insurance

Depending on your local and state laws, business insurance may or may not be optional. However, given that cleaning involves a lot of physical contact with valuable items (not to mention the fact that you will be in the profession of making floors slippery), you may want to consider getting insurance even if you’re not required to have it.

General liability insurance can protect you in the case of lawsuits or accidents, including property damage and personal injury claims against your business. It can also make your business seem more professional to prospective clients.

Your own equipment is also subject to wear and tear, as well as accidents, so you may want to consider property insurance for any items that aren’t easily replaced.

While those are the big two worth considering, you may also want to consider other types of business insurance to help cover anything from worker’s comp claims to vehicle damage.

Seek Business Funding

Now that you have a sense of what your expenses will be, it’s time to see if you can cover them out of pocket and still pay your rent. If you can’t, and are unable to tighten your belt without sacrificing the tenets of your business plan, you may need to seek some source of external funding.

Where should you look?

Personal Savings

If you’ve saved up for a rainy day, the weather might start looking pretty stormy right about the time you’re starting a business. The nice thing about dipping into your savings is that you’re not taking on debt and all the expenses that go with it.

On the other hand, you are risking your own money, along with the lost-opportunity costs of not being able to invest that money in something else.

And, of course, you may not have been able to save enough to cover your expenses anyway.

Tap Your Support Network

If you don’t have the money handy, another option is to ask your family or friends for a small loan. Generally speaking, your support network will give you a better deal than even the most competitive bank will.

Asking your friends and family for money can be tacky and awkward if you don’t put their concerns at ease. You also may damage your relationships if you aren’t able to pay the money back within the expected period of time. It’s important to take a professional and organized approach.

If you do go this route, strongly consider formalizing any agreements you make so that all parties are fully aware of what they’re risking and stand to gain from the arrangement. Create and sign a contract, just as you would do with a traditional lender.

Credit Cards

For purchases you can pay off quickly, it’s hard to beat the convenience and incentives of credit cards.

Credit cards come in both personal and business varieties. You don’t actually have to own a business to get a business credit card, but their rewards programs are generally more geared towards business expenses.

If you’re going to use credit cards, be sure to use them wisely. That means paying them off within the interest-free grace period offered by your card’s provider. For personal credit cards, this is legally at least 21 days from the time you receive your bill. For business credit cards, there is no legal minimum, but most extend a similar one as a courtesy.

Just remember, if you fail to pay your card off with that window, carrying a balance on a credit card is an extremely expensive way to finance your business. And avoid taking out cash advances on your cards unless absolutely necessary.

Recommended Option: Capital One Spark Cash Select For Business

Capital One Spark Cash Select For Business


capital one spark cash select
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Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


14.74% – 22.74%, Variable

Spark Cash Select for Business is great for businesses that don’t have their expenses concentrated in a single area, or that don’t want to worry about complex reward programs. You’ll simply earn 1.5% cash back on every purchase you make. There’s also no limit on the reward, so you don’t have to worry about exceeding a maximum threshold: whether you spend $20 or $500,000 in a year on your card, you’ll still get 1.5% back.

You will need to have excellent credit to qualify, however.

Recommended Option: Capital One Spark Classic

Capital One Spark Classic For Business


Compare

Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


24.74%, Variable

If you don’t qualify for Spark Cash Select for Business, Capital One offers an equally versatile card that’s much easier to qualify for. Spark Classic offers a similar cashback reward program, but the rate of return is 1% rather than 1.5%.

While not the most exciting card, it’s a good one for repairing your credit.

Loans

Business loans are frequently out of reach for brand new businesses–even the more risk-taking lenders generally want to see that you can keep your business together for at least six months before they’ll lend to you. That said, there are exceptions to the rule, with some lenders focusing on new businesses.

And remember, when you’re starting out you don’t necessarily need a “business” loan; personal loans can leverage your personal credit for an early cash infusion even you need it. If you’re buying a specific piece of equipment, you should also consider equipment financing.

Recommended Option: Lending Club Personal Loans

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Lending Club is a good option for individuals who may not have the strongest credit, but have a good debt-to-income ratio. The borrowing range is fairly narrow at $1k to $40k, but when you’re just starting out you don’t want to go too deeply into debt anyway. You’ll have three-to-five years to pay it off, which makes it fairly manageable while you’re building up your business.

Recommended Option: Lendio

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Lendio takes some of the frustration out of applying for a loan by allowing you to apply to their entire network of lenders all at once. If you’re thinking about tapping the alternative lending market for the first time, it’s a pretty good place to start.

They can’t necessarily help every business, but a shotgun approach can sometimes be easier than finding that one special lender.

Recommended Option: Upstart

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If you’re having trouble finding a lender who will work with you, take a look at Upstart. You’ll need to have at least fair credit and a regular source of income, but otherwise, Upstart’s way of evaluating potential borrowers is pretty unconventional (good news if you’re starting a business).

Better yet, Upstart’s rates are pretty reasonable and you’ll have three or five years (one or the other, not between) to pay your balance off. Unfortunately, they don’t currently lend within West Virginia or Iowa.

Need more options? Check out our feature on startup loans. Need a vehicle for the business? Read our auto loans guide.

Choose The Right Software

As your business grows and becomes more complex, managing the logistics of your company can become quite labor-intensive. If you don’t want to sink too many man-hours into keeping track of all that stuff, you’ll want to delegate it to a software program.

This doesn’t necessarily mean you have to enroll in a bunch of expensive SaaS platforms if it’s just you cleaning for a handful of clients, but it doesn’t hurt to know what kinds of options are available.

Types of software you may want to consider include:

Field Service Management 

This type of software centralizes processes and workflows for businesses that have employees who are dispatched to external sites for work. They often include features like scheduling, dispatching, and booking. Some also come with invoicing, payment processing, and customer notifications, so it’s quite possible to find an all-in-one service that meets your needs.

Scheduling Software

If field management software sounds like overkill, you can try scheduling software to manage your appointments and those of your employees.

Inventory Tracking

If your business is growing, and you no longer have time to run out to buy supplies every time you need them or use your clients’ stash, you may find it helpful to formally keep track of your inventory.

Accounting Software

It’s always a good idea to keep track of your expenses, accounts receivable, payroll and related issues, especially as your business grows and becomes more complex.

Data QuickBooks Online Xero Wave Zoho Books FreshBooks

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Best Cloud-Based Accounting Software

Best Cloud Accounting Software

Best Cloud-Based Accounting Software

Best Cloud Accounting Software

Pricing

$20 – 150/month

$9 – 60/month

Free

$9 – 29/month

$15 – $50/month

Customer Support Fair Poor Good

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Very Good

Ease of Use Moderate Moderate Very Easy Very Easy

Very Easy

Accounting Method Cash and Accrual Cash and Accrual Cash and Accrual Cash and Accrual Cash and Accrual
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Bolster Your Web Presence

A cleaning business can get pretty far on word-of-mouth and savvy networking, but expanding your reach in the digital age usually means you’ll want to bolster your web presence.

A website is still a very important way for potential clients to find out information about your business and what services you offer. Happily, for a cleaning service, it doesn’t have to be all that complicated. If you don’t want to contract the job out, there are plenty of services online that make it easy to build your own decent-looking website.

A spiffy website is only one aspect of an online strategy, however. You still need to get people to visit it. You’ll want to consider factors like search engine optimization (SEO) so that, for example, the phrase “kitchen cleaning Rochester” will return your website in the top results.

You may also want to use social media to build brand recognition, steer traffic to your site, and announce specials or changes to your services.

Delegate Work

If it’s just you and a cart full of cleaning supplies, you can skip this part. However, if you’re planning to grow beyond what one mere mortal can clean in a day, you may be taking on more people.

Employees

Taking on additional people as employees come with many advantages: you’ll be able to get significantly more work done, have a larger pool of expertise to draw from, and be more flexible with scheduling. This does come with some additional costs, as you’ll be paying some of the taxes on their salary as well as offering benefits (at least in theory), so be sure to grow your staff wisely and at a pace that fits the amount of business your generating.

In exchange, you’re allowed greater control over the parameters of how your employee works, where, and at what time. Setting a wage that’s fair and not abusing this relationship will generally improve morale and help you avoid the costly process of employee turnover.

Contractors

If you aren’t quite ready to take on employees but need additional help, you can hire contractors. Contractors are free agents who work for themselves even though they may be regularly and continuously used by a particular client (that’s you). Since they’re self-employed, you don’t have to worry about additional expenses beyond paying their fee.

Beware that many businesses make the mistake of treating 1099 contractors as employees, which can get you into pretty serious trouble. If you want to have employees, you have to hire them. As a general rule, you have no say over what jobs a contractor decides to take, the methods they use to complete the job, or the precise time they choose to do it.

Advertise Your Business

A strong web presence and social media campaign can get help get your name out, but we aren’t quite at the point where advertising is obsolete.

Since a cleaning business is constrained by geography, you have to physically send someone out to do the job. That means you can use your modest advertising budget to buy ads in your local market, which is usually cheaper than trying to grab eyeballs from several states away. Ideally, you’ll want to seek ad platforms utilized by the types of people who are likely to buy your services. Cash-strapped kids at the local state college campus probably don’t have a budget for cleaning services, for example (although some fraternities or sororities may), while busy soccer moms might.

Once you know who you’re advertising to, you can select a medium that fits your target demographic. Once you start getting new customers, ask them where they heard about your business so you can get a sense of which ads are working and which aren’t.

Even if you don’t have money to spend on advertising right away, put the word out to your own social network that you’re offering cleaning services. Word can spread fast, especially if you have a reputation as a trustworthy person.

Final Thoughts

We still haven’t invented self-cleaning spaces, so you have a potentially bottomless demand for your services. With relatively low overhead, a housekeeping or cleaning business is one of the more accessible industries to jump into, so if you have the skills and the inclination, why not give it a try?

The post The Step-By-Step Guide To Starting And Funding A Cleaning Business appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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The Step-By-Step Guide To Starting And Funding A Tutoring Business

The news cycle is full of hype about the “knowledge economy” but often light on details about how the average person can catch a piece of the tutoring action. Do you have a skill you’ve carefully honed over the years — or even one you have accidentally cultivated through repetition at your job? Don’t have state certification and six years of college handy? No worries; you don’t have to have an MA in education to be an effective teacher. One of the more accessible points of entry to a career in education is to teach those skills to other people via the increasingly lucrative tutoring industry.

Have you considered starting a tutoring business? Tutoring may be one of the easier avenues to make a little cash in the knowledge-selling economy, but expanding a part-time coaching gig to full-time, lucrative business can take a surprising amount of planning and resources. Not sure where to start? We’ll walk you through a step-by-step process for planning your tutoring business. We’ll also give you some ideas for where you can turn for funding when you need it.

Ready? Let’s go!

Pick A Tutoring Niche

Life is full of paradoxes, but one key part of thinking big is to narrow your focus. Creativity is as informed by limitation as it is by possibility.

As you would when starting any kind of business, think about where you can add value and what problems your skill set can solve. Are people in your area already doing what you’re planning to do? Is there an X-factor you could offer? A different spin on the familiar? Or is there a niche that’s unserved or under-served, particularly in your local area? For that matter, does your area have needs for specific skill sets?

Don’t have the skills or the local demand to create a flute tutoring business?

You can always fall back on subjects that are in high demand. Languages. Writing. Math. Science. And remember, each of these subjects can be broken down farther into sub-categories like algebra, chemistry, conversational Spanish, etc.

Another safe approach is to tutor students who are studying for standardized tests like the SATs, GREs, and LSATs or even trade certification tests like CompTIA A+ for IT technicians. The possibilities aren’t quite endless, but they are numerous.

Choose A Business Location

One of the great things about tutoring is that you can do it just about anywhere: at a dedicated business site, at a college library, at a coffee shop, at your home, or remotely over the internet.

Early on, your choice of location may not be critical–you can tailor your work environment to meet your own needs and the needs of your clients. Obviously, some of those options will disappear once your business gets large enough–your local coffee shop may or may not appreciate you using their space to run your business–so you’ll want to have a growth strategy in mind if you’re planning on turning your business into a tutoring empire down the road.

At the same time, you’ll want to avoid spending more on overhead than your business strategy requires. If you don’t need a brick and mortar space or a fancy interactive website right away, it may be best to hold off on those investments while you build your brand and reputation.

You’ll also want to consider the demographics of your clientele. Are they easily distracted teenagers who may have a hard time concentrating with a lot of background noise? Are they older adults who aren’t as tech-savvy as you are? Are they dependent on public transportation or parents to get to you? Does your subject matter require extra space for demonstrations? Are you working with clients with learning or physical disabilities? Are you going to need WiFi?

Keep all of these factors in mind when you’re considering a location for your tutoring business.

Create A Business Plan (If You’re Going Big)

If you’re going to be tutoring as a side gig, you can probably skip this part, but it’s not a bad exercise for anyone to try, even if they aren’t planning to incorporate anytime soon.

A business plan is simply a written, organized description of your planned business and business strategy. It’s your vision of how your business will develop, operate, and finance itself. It can also help show prospective financiers and grant-money sources that you’re organized and serious about your operation.

You can find a lot of guidance online about how to organize your business plan. Likewise, your local chamber of commerce and government economic development agencies (and similar organizations) often have resources you can tap.

A typical business plan includes the following:

  • Executive Summary
  • Company Description
  • Market Overview
  • Sales & Marketing Strategy
  • Operating Plan
  • Organizations & Management Team
  • Financials

Calculate Starting Costs

Once you have a basic idea of how your business will operate, it’s time to calculate your starting costs. Does your subject require materials, teaching aids, or similar items? Are you renting a workspace? Are you paying employees or subcontractors? Shelling out for a web host? Purchasing hardware or software? Buying insurance?

Some of these costs may be trivial enough to finance out of pocket, while others may require additional effort. As a new business owner, finding funding can be especially challenging. Many traditional sources of funding, bank loans in particular, usually aren’t available to businesses that are newer than two years old.

Funding Options For Tutoring Businesses

So what do you do if you need money? Here are some options:

Personal Savings

Obvious? Maybe, but tapping your personal savings has distinct advantages over going into debt. You may be accessing your rainy funds, but you won’t be losing additional money on interest payments.

Of course, you are taking a risk using your own money to finance your business. If your business fails, you’ve effectively lost that money. For that reason, and as a general best practice, it’s a good idea to separate your business finances from your personal ones.

Tap Your Support Network

Another option, especially if you don’t have much in personal savings, is to ask friends and family for a loan. Unlike a private lender, your support system probably isn’t trying to make a profit off of you.

Keep in mind that this comes with its own risks. You may stress your relationships, especially if you aren’t able to pay back these so-called friendly loans quickly. One way to avoid this is to formalize any agreements you make with friends and family so that everyone fully understands what they’re getting into and what the expectations are. You may even want to draw up a formal contract that outlines any expected payments and return on investment.

Credit Cards

One of the easier–and riskier–ways to fund your startup expenses is with personal or business credit cards (you don’t actually have to own a business to get a business credit card). Credit cards offer a lot of flexibility and convenience when it comes to making purchases. Even better, many credit cards offer reward programs that can actually save judicious users money.

However, keep in mind that credit cards carry very high interest rates on any balances you carry from month to month. Most business credit cards — and all personal credit cards — offer a grace period of at least 21 days. Purchases that you pay off within that window do not accrue interest. This makes credit cards ideal for purchases you can pay off quickly, and problematic for ones that you can’t.

Note: Avoid taking out cash advances on your cards unless absolutely necessary. They come at a very high cost.

Recommended Option: Chase Ink Business Cash

Chase Ink Business Cash



Apply Now

Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


15.49% – 21.49%, Variable

Business credit cards often have aggressive rewards programs, but rarely will you find one that offers 5 percent cash back on qualified purchases. And since that includes office supplies, the card’s not a bad fit for tutoring.

There’s a $25,000 cap on the higher rates of return, but with no annual fee, it’s quite a bargain.

Recommended Option: Capital One Spark Classic

Capital One Spark Classic For Business


Compare

Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


24.74%, Variable

If you don’t qualify for the Chase Ink Business Cash, Capital One’s Spark Classic is an easy-to-qualify-for, no-frills cash back card that can help you save money on purchases while building up your credit.

You’re only getting 1 percent back on purchases, but it’s not a bad place to start if you’re coming off a year or two of hard luck.

Personal Loans

Traditional business loans may not be an option for new businesses, but you can often use personal loans to cover some of your startup expenses. Since you don’t have to worry about business-oriented qualifying factors like the amount of time you’ve been in business, these loans can be easier to get when you’re first starting out.

The downside is you won’t have the liability protection you’d theoretically have if you applied as a business. You may also be more limited in terms of the amount of money you can take out.

Still, if you need a little money to get started and don’t have funds on hand, it’s not a bad option.

Recommended Option: Lending Club Personal Loans

lending club logo

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Lending Club is a good option for individuals who may not have the strongest credit, but have a good debt-to-income ratio. The borrowing range is fairly narrow at $1k to $40k, but when you’re just starting out you don’t want to go too deeply into debt anyway. You’ll have three-to-five years to pay it off, which makes it fairly manageable when you’re first starting out.

Recommended Option: Lendio

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If you’re just entering the alternative loan market for the first time, it can be pretty overwhelming. Lendio takes some of that burden off of you by allowing you to effectively apply to their whole network of lenders with one application.

Recommended Option: Upstart

upstart logo

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Another solid option for non-traditional borrowers is Upstart. So long as you have fair credit (620+), a stable source of income, and live in a state other than West Virginia or Iowa, there’s a pretty good chance Upstart will work with you.

Flexibility is the name of Upstart’s game. How so? They’ll use non-traditional means to get a picture of your credit worthiness and they’ll allow you to select between different payment schedules. And with three to five years to settle your loan, you won’t have to worry about paying it off right away.

Need more options? Check out our feature on startup loans.

Grants

Nothing’s better than “free” money, and grants might be the closest thing to that in the real world. Grants usually require a fairly involved application/writing process and, as you might expect, are often highly competitive. So while you may not have to worry about interest with grants, you do want to factor in the amount of time you have to spend trying to get a grant, especially considering there’s a high chance that you won’t be selected for the grant.

On the other hand, being awarded a grant comes with some prestige that you can then use in your marketing efforts. And it is “free” money, after all.

If you need some help figuring out where to look for grants, check out our feature on the topic.

ROBS

Not your neighbor-with-the-nice-car Rob, but Rollovers as Business Startups. If you haven’t heard of ROBS, don’t feel bad. They’re extremely niche products for entrepreneurs with retirement accounts like 401(k)s.

For a fee, a ROBS provider allows you to use money from your retirement account to pay for startup costs without incurring the tax penalty you normally would by tapping those funds early.

As is the case with personal savings, you are risking your own money.

ROBS will be overkill for most new tutoring businesses, but if your startup costs look like they’re going to pile up, keep them in mind.

Recommended Option: Guidant Financial

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If you’re in the market for a ROBS, it’s worth checking out Guidant Financial. If your retirement account has at least $40k in it, you can roll over up to 100 percent of your funds.

Register Your Business

blogging

This part is technically optional, but if you’re planning to build your tutoring business into more than an occasional source of freelance income, you should probably register your business.

If you do nothing at all, your business will default to a sole proprietorship (or a partnership, if you’re starting it with someone else). This essentially means that you’ve started a business with your own name. Sole proprietorships have the advantage of being cheap and easy to start. Your taxes will also be easier to file (and lower) than they would generally be with other forms of incorporation. Keep in mind, however, that for liability purposes, sole proprietorships and the individuals behind them are essentially one and the same. While it won’t separate your personal and business finances, you should consider filing a DBA (Doing Business As) with your local county clerk. This will allow you to legally operate your business under its own name (Uber Math Works as opposed to Barry Holgram, for example).

Other forms of incorporation will require a bit more work and come with their own advantages and disadvantages. This is where the business plan we talked about earlier will come in handy, because you’ll need one if you’re going to incorporate. Keep in mind that incorporation comes with costs and additional responsibilities, so make sure you’re at the point where it makes sense for your business.

Here are the most popular ways to incorporate:

  • Limited Liability Corporations (LLCs): If you’ve seen LLC after a corporation’s name, you’re dealing with this type of company. LLCs offer limited liability protection for their owners without the full complexity of a corporation. Each state has its own rules for how to start and maintain an LLC, and you don’t necessarily have to register your LLC in the state where you’re doing business (although you’ll generally want to). LLC owners report their business earnings and losses on their personal taxes.
  • C-Corp: This is the “basic,” default form of incorporation. Shareholders are considered the owner(s) of the company and receive limited liability protection; however, the business decisions are made by corporate officers who may or may not be shareholders. The corporation is taxed separately and shareholders pay income tax on dividends. To form a C-corp, you’ll file articles of incorporation with your state.
  • S-Corp: S-corps are similar to C-corps in most ways, but come with a few additional restrictions: you have to have fewer than 100 shareholders and they have to all be U.S. citizens or residents. Unlike C-corps, profits and losses are reported on personal taxes, not unlike an LLC. In addition to filing articles of incorporation, you’ll also need to file IRS Form 2553.

Separate Personal And Business Finances

Even if you’re going to run your tutoring business as a sole proprietorship, you should take steps to separate your business finances from your personal ones. A separate business checking and/or savings account can save you a ton of headache when it’s time to pay your taxes. And even for your own edification, it will make your profits and losses much easier to track.

Choose An Hourly Rate

Get your merchant funds fast. Image description: Clock with money underneath it

Figuring out how much to charge for your tutoring services can be one of the more challenging parts of getting your business up and running.

A good place to start is to do some research on the prevailing rate for similar services in your area and then figure out a strategy for your business. Are you going to try to undersell the competition? Charge more but offer something your competitors don’t? You can glean this information often from your competitors’ websites or by checking out third-party sites that do regional salary comparisons for different industries. You may also want to speak to local colleges and schools about how they handle independent tutors.

It sounds obvious, but you don’t want to charge so little that you’re breaking even, or even losing money, on your gig. Take into account the transportation costs of meeting your clients, any money you’re spending on coffee, etc. And be sure to deduct those expenses when it comes time to pay your self-employment taxes!

Bolster Your Web Presence

Word of mouth can still go a long way in the tutoring business, but these days there’s really no way to avoid the necessity of building a strong digital presence.

It never hurts to have a sleek, attractive website. Indeed, it can make your operation look professional as well as help build hype for your services. Luckily there are user-friendly and cost-effective ways to build a website.

That said, a website is not the only way to use the internet to build up your tutoring business.

Remember that the web is, itself, a medium for instruction and tutoring. You may want to consider offering some freebies on YouTube, for example, to build up your reputation. In addition, free services can function as advertisements for your paid services. Just make sure you don’t make your paid services extraneous.

Social media strategy is too complex to go into in great depth here, but making posts that are fun to read and interact with is a good place to start.

Advertise Your Business

In addition to what we covered above in web presence, you’ll also want to get your name out there in other ways. If you’re just starting out, you’re probably not looking at expensive media buys on TV, radio, or even your local newspaper.

Let your network know what you’re up to so they can spread the word about your new tutoring. Make a Facebook page. Get yourself a Twitter account. Offer free consultations with curious parties. Even cheap, low-tech solution like flyers with tear-off tags can be powerful if you post them in the right places.

Final Thoughts

Does helping someone grow and learn while earning money sound like a dream job? Tutoring can be one of the more rewarding and flexible businesses you can get into. But while the demand for expertise is often high, you’ll still want to approach the industry with a strategic mindset. Take your time, narrow down your niche, and build your reputation and tutoring can turn into so much more than just a side gig.

The post The Step-By-Step Guide To Starting And Funding A Tutoring Business appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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The Complete Guide To Disputing Errors On Your Credit Report

Worried that your credit history may have errors that could negatively affect your business? Luckily, the companies that produce credit reports offer ways to dispute errors.

While it might be time-consuming to correct a report, a successful dispute can only be advantageous in the long run. A little time spent now could save you and your business from a major headache down the road—especially when applying for loans or credit cards.

Want to know how you can dispute a problem on your credit report? We’ve got all the information you need below.

What Is A Credit Report?

A credit report details your credit history. It can include information regarding your past loan payments, current status of credit accounts, and other financial records, such as foreclosures or bankruptcies.

Credit bureaus compile credit reports by collecting and selling various data regarding individual credit histories. While there are numerous bureaus around today, three are the most well-known and influential: Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. We’ve gone over credit bureaus in more depth before.

Credit reports play an important role when you are looking for a loan, a new credit card, or insurance. If you have a history of failing to make payments, or perhaps you have a lot of credit tied up already, potential creditors may think twice before working with you.

These reports also help calculate your credit score. A credit score is an important tool that summarizes the health of your credit history. Many potential lenders or credit card issuers will heavily consider your credit score when you apply. If your score is too low, you may need to work on improving it.

How To Get Your Credit Report

blogging

Fortunately, it doesn’t cost much to request a credit report. In fact, in many cases, you’ll be able to ask for a copy of your credit report for free.

Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax are legally required to issue you a no-cost credit report every 12 months. This free report will be your full credit report—although it won’t include credit scores. To request a report, you’ll need to visit annualcreditreport.com and select which of the three major bureaus you’d like to request a report from.

In addition, if you apply for credit and are denied, you’ll have the ability to request the credit report used in the decision. You’ll have 60 days to order this credit report from the bureau that supplied the report reviewed by the creditor. This type of report is known as an “adverse action credit report.” Going this route is free and does not count against your annual report tally.

On top of those free credit report options, there are websites dedicated to sharing details regarding your credit history. Some of the big websites include Credit Karma, WalletHub, and Credit Journey from Chase. Most of these websites are free and we’ve previously discussed our favorite ones. However, note that in many cases you can’t get a full credit report through these places; instead, they’ll likely share a credit score alongside some supplemental information.

How To Dispute Errors On Your Report

If you’ve spotted an error on your credit report—say you notice a misspelled name or an account that has been incorrectly deemed delinquent—the question comes up: how do you dispute errors on a report?

Here’s our step-by-step guide:

1. Contact The Credit Bureau

There are several ways to contact a credit bureau to submit a dispute.

Most commonly, you can send a letter. If you choose this path,  include all the necessary documentation that supports your dispute. Additionally, clearly outline which item or items you dispute, state why you dispute the information, and make it obvious that you wish for the information to be removed or changed.

If sending a letter, make sure to send it via certified mail. This way you’ll have a record once it’s received, giving you a paper trail. Plus, it’s also a good idea to keep a copy of the letter for your personal records.

The three major credit bureaus also offer online tools to submit a dispute. However, this process varies for each bureau so you’ll need to check the website of the bureau you plan to submit a dispute with.

In some cases, sending a fax may be another option. Bureaus also often let you call to start a dispute claim. However, it is generally recommended to leave a paper trail when possible, something that may not be possible with a phone call.

2. Wait For And Review The Results Of The Investigation

In most cases, the credit bureau will have 30 days to investigate after receiving your dispute. You’ll then want to give them up to two weeks before their response reaches you. As such, you may need to wait up to 45 days before you hear anything from the credit bureau.

When the investigation is finished, the credit bureau will send you the results in writing. Additionally, you’ll also receive an updated credit report if the dispute is found accurate. This updated copy is free and does not count towards your one free annual report. You’ll also receive a copy of the name, address, and phone number of the provider that reported the erroneous information.

You may additionally ask that notifications of any corrections be sent out to anyone who has received a copy of your credit report in the previous six months. For employment purposes, you may also request that anyone who received a copy in the last two years be sent the updated report.

3. Check Your Reports For Changes

Several months after your dispute has been fixed by the credit bureau in question, you’ll want to make sure your actual reports have been updated. Note that the time a report updates may depend on the specific credit bureau’s update cycle and when the provider sends information to bureaus.

If you don’t see any changes to your reports from other bureaus, it is possible the provider did not report the update to other bureaus. Should this happen, you’ll want to inform the provider that you disputed an inaccurate item on your credit report. If the provider continues sending disputed information to other bureaus, they must note that the information has been disputed. Assuming your dispute is accurate, the provider must tell bureaus to delete or update the information in question.

As long as the provider verifies the accuracy of your dispute, the credit bureau cannot continue to place that information in your credit report. This means that future reports should show the updated information. It just may take several months for an updated report to become accurate.

Final Thoughts

It’s important you get an error fixed promptly when you spot one on your credit report. If you leave the error untouched, you may have difficulty applying for loans or credit cards. This in turn may impact your business’s ability to run smoothly and efficiently. As such, a successful dispute can only mean good things for your business in the future—even if the process does seem a bit cumbersome.

The post The Complete Guide To Disputing Errors On Your Credit Report appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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Deferred Interest: What You Need To Know

 

When hunting for a credit card, a loan, or another financing arrangement, you may come across offers advertising “no interest for 12 months” or “same as cash” financing. Take care, because often times, this arrangement will entail deferred interest. Deferred interest financing carries risks that are typically not well understood and often not explained clearly by the lender.

In this article, we’re going to tackle the murky subject of deferred interest.

What Is Deferred Interest?

Deferred interest is defined by Investopedia in the following way:

Deferred interest is the amount of interest added to the principal balance of a loan when the contractual terms of the loan allow for a scheduled payment to be made that is less than the interest due.

That’s the textbook definition of the deferred interest — interest that has accrued on a loan but hasn’t been paid. But how does deferred interest actually work in the real world? Let’s explore.

How Deferred Interest Works

Let’s say you purchased some exercise equipment with a store credit card offering deferred interest for 12 months in order to avoid having to pay the full cost up front. As the months go by without your balance being paid in full, interest will accrue on your card, but you won’t be responsible for paying it off — yet.

Now, if you pay off your balance within 12 months, this accumulated interest will not come due, and you will have paid for your purchase with what is essentially an interest-free loan. However, if you don’t pay off your purchase in its entirety within that 12 months, all the interest accumulated over that 12-month period (not just the interest on the portion of the balance you have yet to pay) is then added to the amount you owe.

One insidious aspect of this arrangement is that the kind of store credit cards that typically offer deferred interest financing normally have high APRs, thus increasing the interest charges you’ll be hit with if you don’t pay the balance in full within 12 months.

Deferred Interest VS 0% APR Introductory Rate

A credit card offering deferred interest financing under the sophistry of “no interest for 12 months” is not the same thing as a credit card offering an introductory 0% APR. I explained how deferred interest works in this particular context with the above example, but let’s say that instead, you purchased the exercise equipment with a newly-obtained credit card that sports a 12-month intro 0% APR period.

You’ll be able to pay off your balance over the course of your first 12 months without being responsible for any interest payments, just as with the deferred interest card. The difference comes after your first 12 months are up. After this point, you’ll become responsible for any interest that accumulates on the remaining balance of your card, but not for the interest you didn’t pay during your initial 12 months with the card.

If that sounds like a better, fairer, and safer arrangement, that’s because it is.

Pros & Cons of Deferred Interest

If everything goes right and you’re able to pay back the principal of a deferred interest loan in full before the period of deferred interest ends, congratulations! Your deferred interest loan has worked out for you and has not caused you any harm.

However, lenders bank (literally) on the increasingly high likelihood that everything will not go right for you during this period. Americans, particularly working-class families, face constant unexpected financial “challenges” from which they enjoy little to no protection. So if you lose your job or your child gets sick and you can’t pay your balance in full before the end of your deferred interest period, your lender will reap the financial benefits of your misfortune and you will be left high and dry.

Best Practices When Using Deferred Interest

Before signing up for a deferred interest loan or credit card, seek out all possible alternative financing arrangements first. If you’ve exhausted these alternatives and find yourself in the unenviable position of having to rely on a deferred interest loan to pay for an expense, make absolutely sure you can pay off the purchase before the deferred interest period ends to avoid being hit with retroactively-applied interest charges.

Additionally, if you use a deferred interest credit card to finance a purchase, avoid charging anything else to this card if you possibly can. That’s because if you ring up additional charges on your card after your initial purchase, the standard purchase APR may apply to those additional charges, and under the terms of the CARD Act (legislation meant to protect consumers in other contexts), any payments you make on your debt will apply first to these additional charges, not to your initial purchase (the purchase on which the unpaid deferred interest is accumulating). That’s because the CARD Act mandates that when you make a payment on your card greater than the minimum due, the amount beyond the minimum due must be applied to the balance with the highest interest rate first.

So while you might assume that your payments will first apply to your initial balance, this is not the case. To go back to my example, you might think that you’ve paid off that exercise equipment you purchased once you’ve made payments on your card equal to the amount of said purchase. But if you’ve made any subsequent purchases on that card, a portion of what you’ve paid will go towards those balances first, leaving a portion of your initial balance unpaid.

And remember, even if you have just one dollar of that initial purchase left outstanding at the end of your deferred interest period, you’ll become responsible for paying all the interest that has accumulated over 12 months on that entire purchase, not just on that one dollar left unpaid.

In short, if you make a purchase on a deferred interest card, don’t use that card to make any further purchases. It can only get you in trouble.

Final Thoughts

The parasitic purveyors of deferred interest loans know that the consumers their products are aimed at are overworked, harried, and dealing with an unholy myriad of escalating financial demands — housing, education, health care, etc. These consumers often don’t have the financial literacy required to make sense of deferred interest offers and can easily find themselves hit with large interest charges on purchases they believed to be interest-free, leaving the most vulnerable people in our society open to being fleeced by unscrupulous lenders.

As a result, the cosseted 1% benefits at the expense of the beleaguered 99%. It’s as if a familiar pattern were at play here.

The most direct advice I can give on the subject of deferred interest financial products: Get a traditional credit card with a 0% introductory APR offer instead. Many popular credit cards (both business and personal) are offered with a 0% intro APR period of 9-12 months, though there are other cards offering 15 or even 21-month 0% APR periods. With these cards, you’ll never have to pay retroactive interest, only interest that accumulates on your card’s balance after your 0% APR period ends.

Credit Card 0% Introductory Period Next Steps
American Express Blue Business Plus 0% APR on purchases and balance transfers for the first 15 months Compare
Chase Ink Business Unlimited 0% APR on purchases and balance transfers for the first 12 months Apply Now
American Express SimplyCash Plus 0% APR on purchases for the first 9 months Compare
Capital One Spark Cash Select For Business 0% APR on purchases for the first 9 months Compare
Bank of America Business Advantage Cash Rewards Mastercard 0% APR on purchases and balance transfers for the first 9 months Compare

If such a credit card appeals to you, let Merchant Maverick help you out in your search!

  • Best Business Credit Cards For 2019
  • APR VS Interest Rate: Know The Difference
  • Top Business Credit Card Balance Transfer Offers
  • Credit Card Balance Transfers Demystified

The post Deferred Interest: What You Need To Know appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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The Top No Transfer Fee Credit Cards Worth Your Look

no transfer fee credit cards

If you’re looking for a credit card that can help you claw your way out of debt, you might consider transferring your debt to a card with no balance transfer fees and a 0% introductory APR on balance transfers.

With a typical credit card, interest payments on your debt can keep you stuck in that debt hole. If you can transfer your balance to a card with a nice long 0% intro balance transfer APR, you stand to save money. And if that card charges no balance transfer fees, all the better!

Generally, credit cards with 0% intro rates on balance transfers are more common than cards with no transfer fees whatsoever. In fact, with business credit cards, it’s quite uncommon to find a card with no balance transfer fee. Nonetheless, when it comes to transferring a balance from another card, some business cards are better than others.

In this article, we’re going to look at the best credit cards for balance transfers, both business and personal. However, here’s something I should mention at the outset: Most credit card issuers don’t allow you to transfer a balance from one of their cards to another. For example, you can’t transfer a balance from one American Express card to another Amex card.

For more details on how balance transfers work, go read our handy guide on balance transfers for small business owners. (Non-business-owners can take advantage of these tips too!)

Credit Card Balance Transfer Fee Balance Transfer 0% Intro Rate
Spark Cash from Capital One 0% None
Amex Blue Business Plus 3% 0% APR for 15 months
Chase Ink Business Cash 5% 0% APR for 12 months
Amex EveryDay Credit Card 0% for the first 60 days 0% APR for 15 months
Chase Slate 0% for the first 60 days 0% APR for 15 months
BankAmericard Credit Card for Students 0% for the first 60 days 0% APR for 15 months
SunTrust Prime Rewards Credit Card 0% for the first 60 days Prime Rate (currently 5.50%) APR for 3 years

Best Business Credit Card With No Transfer Fees

Spark Cash from Capital One

Capital One Spark Cash For Business


capital one spark cash select
Compare

Annual Fee:


$95 ($0 the first year)

 

Purchase APR:


19.24%, Variable

Spark Cash from Capital One is one of the very few business credit cards on the market that does not charge a transaction fee on balances transferred to the card. As such, it must be the best business credit card for balance transfers, right?

Not so fast. While the lack of transaction fees applied to balance transfers is beneficial to entrepreneurs trying to climb out of debt, the card doesn’t carry a 0% intro APR on balance transfers (or purchases for that matter). So while you won’t be assessed a fee for transferring a balance to this card, the monthly APR on your transferred balance will be 19.24% starting the first billing period. If you don’t envision being able to pay off your balance within a few months, you may be better served by Amex’s Blue Business Plus card despite that card’s 3% fee on balance transfers.

The Spark Cash business card offers a great cash back deal: 2% cash back on all purchases with no limit to the amount you can earn. It’s great for business owners who just want cash back without having to consider which category their spending falls into. On the downside, a $95 annual fee kicks in after the first year.

Best Business Credit Cards With 0% APR On Balance Transfers

Blue Business Plus Credit Card from American Express

Blue Business Plus Credit Card from American Express



Compare

Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


13.49% – 21.49%, Variable

The Blue Business Plus Credit Card from American Express might just be the best business credit card currently available for the purposes of transferring a balance. Why?

Two reasons.

First, the card offers a lengthy 15-month 0% APR period for balance transfers. (The card’s business competitors offer, at best, 12 months of 0% APR on balance transfers.) Second, the card applies a 3% fee (or $5, whichever is greater) to balances transferred to the card. While it’s true that there are plenty of personal credit cards that impose no balance transfer fees whatsoever, the Blue Business Plus’s 3% fee is lower than that of most competing business credit cards, most of which charge a 5% balance transfer fee.

Along with being a great business card for balance transfers, the Blue Business Plus also gives you 2 rewards points for every $1 you spend on your first $50,000 worth of purchases per year. What’s more, cardholders are able to purchase above their credit limit so long as they pay the full amount purchased above their credit limit each month (along with the minimum payment).

Chase Ink Business Cash

Chase Ink Business Cash



Apply Now

Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


15.49% – 21.49%, Variable

The Chase Ink Business Cash card offers 0% APR on all balance transfers for 12 months. While this doesn’t quite match the Blue Business Plus’s 15 months, it’s still quite competitive as business cards go. In fact, many business cards offer an introductory 0% rate for purchases only (or not at all).

Unfortunately, the Ink Business Cash charges a 5% (or $5) fee on all balance transfers.

Apart from balance transfers, the Ink Business Cash is a top-of-the-line cash back business card. Here’s what your business spending will get you:

  • 5% cash back on the first $25,000 spent in combined purchases at office supply stores and on internet, cable, and phone purchases each year
  • 2% cash back on the first $25,000 spent in combined purchases at gas stations and restaurants each year
  • 1% cash back on all other purchases

Best Personal Credit Cards With No Transfer Fees

Amex EveryDay Credit Card

Amex EveryDay Credit Card


Amex EveryDay Credit Card
Compare

Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


15.24% – 26.24%, Variable

The Amex EveryDay Credit Card is a uniquely valuable personal credit card for those striving to get out of debt.

The EveryDay card lets you transfer a balance over with no balance transfer fee, provided you transfer the balance within 60 days of opening your account (a 3% charge will apply thereafter). You’ll also enjoy a 0% intro APR on balance transfers and purchases for 15 months and no annual fee.

While the Amex EveryDay card is a great card for cost-free balance transfers, you’ll also get a remarkable level of rewards for such a practical card. You’ll get 2 Membership Rewards points for every dollar spent at a) US supermarkets on up to $6,000 per year in purchases and on b) travel purchases booked through AmexTravel.com. Furthermore, if you make 20 or more purchases with your card in a billing period, you get 20% extra points on those purchases (minus returns and credits).

Of course, such inducements to spend may be said to run counter to the goal of helping you out of debt, but that’s an existential issue outside the purview of this article!

Chase Slate

Chase Slate



Compare

Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


17.24% – 25.99%, Variable

The Chase Slate card is a credit card specifically designed to help you manage your credit card debt.

It’s not an exciting card. There’s no cash back to earn and there are no fancy benefits to accrue. However, the card offers the debt-burdened cardholder three benefits. First, the Chase Slate card lets you transfer a balance over with no balance transfer fee so long as you do so during the first 60 days your account is open. After 60 days, a 5% fee will be applied, so transfer those balances early.

Second, the Chase Slate features a 0% intro APR for 15 months on balance transfers and purchases so you’ll have a decent amount of time to pay off that balance before any interest charges accrue.

Finally, the card carries no annual fee.

BankAmericard Credit Card for Students

BankAmericard Credit Card For Students



Compare

Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


15.24% – 25.24%, Variable

The BankAmericard Credit Card for Students should be of interest to any student (yes, you must be a student to qualify) looking to consolidate credit card debt.

With the BankAmericard student credit card, you can transfer a balance to the card with no fees (provided you do so within 60 days of opening your account.) A 3% charge (or $10, whichever is greater) applies to balance transfers after the initial 60 days. You’ll also get an introductory 0% APR for 15 months on all balances transferred within 60 days of opening your account and on all purchases.

Additionally, the card has no annual fee and you’ll be able to check your FICO score for free with your Mobile Banking app or in Online Banking. There are no rewards to earn.

SunTrust Prime Rewards Credit Card

SunTrust Prime Rewards Credit Card



Compare

Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


13.49% – 23.49%, Variable

The SunTrust Prime Rewards credit card offers a unique deal to debt-addled consumers looking to consolidate credit card debt.

Like several other cards listed here, the SunTrust Prime Rewards card won’t charge you a balance transfer fee on any balances transferred within 60 days of your account opening. However, when it comes to paying off your transferred debt, all balances transferred within 60 days of opening your account will be subject to a Prime Rate (currently 5.50% variable) intro APR for 36 months. Now, 5.50% interest isn’t as good as 0% interest, but you’ll have a full 3 years to pay off your debt at this low rate.

The card has no annual fee and no foreign transaction fee, and you’ll get an unlimited 1% cash back on all qualifying purchases.

Final Thoughts

It may seem odd to use credit cards to work your way out of debt considering the fact that credit cards got you into debt in the first place. However, transferring your debt to the right card can, indeed, save you money on interest payments — provided you play your cards right. [Pause for laughter.]

Still looking for a credit card to fit your small business needs? Check out these helpful articles on the subject!

  • Top Business Credit Card Balance Transfer Offers
  • Best Credit Card Offers For Businesses: January 2019
  • The Best Free Credit Score Sites

The post The Top No Transfer Fee Credit Cards Worth Your Look appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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A Complete Guide To Chase Business And Personal Credit Cards

chase bank credit cards

If you’ve been shopping around for a new credit card, whether for personal or business use, it’s likely you’ve come across a Chase credit card or three. In fact, it would be hard not to — between its own branded credit cards and its co-branded partner cards, Chase has 28 credit cards on offer. That’s a lot of credit cards!

Wouldn’t it be convenient if somebody were to gather pertinent information on every Chase credit card, compile that information into an article, then present it to you via The Internet? Well, fret not, for that day has arrived. Here’s a rundown of every Chase credit card and what each one has to offer you.

(For a look at today’s top business credit cards from Chase and other credit card companies, check out our piece on the top business credit cards of 2019.)

Chase Credit Card Details
Chase Ink Business Preferred Business card for earning points
Chase Ink Business Cash Business card for earning cash back
Chase Ink Business Unlimited Business card for flat-rate cash back
Southwest Rapid Rewards Premier Business Business card for Southwest travel
United Explorer Business Business card for United travel
Mariott Rewards Premier Plus Business Business card for Marriott loyalists
Chase Freedom Personal cash back card with a 15-month 0% intro APR
Chase Freedom Unlimited Flat-rate cash back card with a 15-month 0% intro APR
Chase Sapphire Preferred Flexible travel rewards card
Chase Sapphire Reserve High-end travel rewards card
Chase Slate No annual fee card for credit building
Southwest Rapid Rewards Priority High-end Southwest travel card
Southwest Rapid Rewards Plus Southwest travel card
Southwest Rapid Rewards Premier Southwest travel card with an anniversary points bonus
United Explorer United Airlines travel rewards card
United TravelBank United travel rewards card with no annual fee
United MileagePlus Club Expensive travel card with high-end perks
British Airways Visa Signature British Airways loyalty card w/ large signup bonus
Aer Lingus Visa Signature Aer Lingus travel rewards card w/ transferable rewards
Iberia Visa Signature High points-earning travel card
Marriott Rewards Premier Plus Personal version of the Marriott Rewards Premier Plus Business
The World Of Hyatt Hyatt loyalty card with elite rewards
Disney Premier Visa Card for earning Disney Rewards Dollars
Disney Visa Card for earning Disney Rewards Dollars with no annual fee
IHG Rewards Club Premier Card for earning 10X points at IHG Properties
Starbucks Rewards Visa Card for earning Starbucks Stars
Amazon Rewards Visa Signature 5% Amazon rewards for Amazon Prime members
AARP Credit Card from Chase Cash back card with no annual fee

Business Credit Cards Offered By Chase

1) Chase Ink Business Preferred

Chase Ink Business Preferred



Apply Now 

Annual Fee:


$95

 

Purchase APR:


18.24% – 23.24%, Variable

The Chase Ink Business Preferred card is a great card for business owners looking to get rewarded for their travel purchases. The Ink Business Preferred will see you earning 3 points for every $1 spent on the first $150,000 in combined purchases on travel and select business categories each year.

The Ink Business Preferred also offers an exceptional bonus offer. You’ll get 80,000 points after you spend $5,000 on purchases in your first 3 months of card use, which equates to $1,000 toward travel rewards when you redeem through Chase Ultimate Rewards.

It’s the most “high-end” of the three business credit cards Chase currently offers (not counting the co-branded cards). Unfortunately, this means that unlike the others, this card carries a $95 annual fee.

Image

2) Chase Ink Business Cash

Chase Ink Business Cash



Apply Now

Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


15.49% – 21.49%, Variable

With no annual fee, the Chase Ink Business Cash is all about — quelle surprise! — the cash back.

Here’s the card’s cash back structure:

  • Earn 5% cash back on the first $25,000 spent per year in combined purchases at office supply stores and on internet, cable, and phone services
  • 2% cash back on the first $25,000 spent per year in combined purchases at gas stations and restaurants
  • 1% unlimited cash back on all other purchases

Chase Ink Business Cash℠ Learn More Earn $500 Bonus Cash Back 

3) Chase Ink Business Unlimited

Chase Ink Business Unlimited


chase ink business unlimited
Apply Now 

Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


15.49% – 21.49%, Variable

Chase Ink Business Unlimited is a cash back business card for business owners who would rather not have to worry about which purchases will earn more points than other purchases. The card gives you a flat 1.5% cash back on all purchases with no limit to the number of points you can earn per year. Nice and simple.

As with Ink Business Cash, there’s no annual fee. And like the Ink Business Cash (but unlike the Preferred card), the Ink Business Unlimited offers a 0% intro APR on purchases and balance transfers for 12 months.

Now, let’s check out Chase’s partner business cards.

4) Southwest Rapid Rewards Premier Business Card

If your business has you flying frequently with Southwest Airlines (and only Southwest — Southwest has no airline partners), Chase’s Southwest Rapid Rewards Premier Business card may intrigue you.

You’ll get a hefty bonus offer: 60,000 points after you spend $3,000 on purchases in the first 3 months. You’ll then get:

  • 2 points per $1 spent on Southwest purchases and Rapid Rewards hotel and car rental partner purchases
  • 1 point per dollar spent on everything else

The card carries a $99 annual fee.

5) United Explorer Business Card

This business card is designed to reward the business traveler who flies United. A bonus offer of 75,000 miles awaits you if you spend $5K on purchases in the first 3 months.

You’ll earn 2 miles per dollar spent on all United purchases as well as on purchases at restaurants, gas stations, and office supply stores (1 mile per dollar on all other purchases). You’ll also get such perks as a free checked bag (a $120 value per round trip), two one-time United Club passes each year, and priority boarding for you and any companions on the same reservation.

The card carries a $95 annual fee after the first year, which is free.

6) Marriott Rewards Premier Plus Business

Here’s a business travel card for those who like to stay in Marriott hotels. Similar to Chase’s other branded partner business cards, you’ll get a 75,000 point bonus for spending $3K in the first 3 months.

When you use your Marriott card at participating Marriott and Starwood properties, you’ll get an impressive 6 points for every dollar spent. You’ll get 2 points per dollar on all other spending. The card does carry a $95 annual fee, however.

Personal Credit Cards Offered By Chase

7) Chase Freedom

Chase Freedom



Compare

Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


17.24% – 25.99%, Variable

The Chase Freedom card is a simple personal credit card with no annual fee, a 15-month 0% intro APR period, and rotating rewards categories.

Earn 5% cash back on up to $1,500 in combined purchases in bonus categories per quarter. The bonus categories change on a quarterly basis. You’ll earn 1% cash back on all other purchases.

8) Chase Freedom Unlimited

Chase Freedom Unlimited



Compare

Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


17.24% – 25.99%, Variable

The Chase Freedom Unlimited card resembles the Chase Freedom card in almost every way — same lack of an annual fee, same 15-month 0% APR period, same signup bonus ($150 after you spend $500 on purchases in your first 3 months). The one real difference lies in how you accumulate cash back.

Instead of having to worry about rotating 5% cash back categories, the Freedom Unlimited offers a flat 1.5% cash back on every purchase.

9) Chase Sapphire Preferred

Chase Sapphire Preferred



Compare

Annual Fee:


$95 ($0 the first year)

 

Purchase APR:


18.24% – 25.24%, Variable

The Chase Sapphire Preferred card is a personal travel rewards card from Chase. You’ll get 2 points for every dollar spent on travel and dining and one point per dollar on everything else.

When you redeem your points for Ultimate Rewards portal purchases, your points will be worth 1.25 cents apiece. The card carries a $95 annual fee, waived for the first year.

10) Chase Sapphire Reserve

Chase Sapphire Reserve



Compare

Annual Fee:


$450

 

Purchase APR:


17.99% – 24.99%, Variable

Want a high-end travel card with great perks and high points earning potential? Don’t mind paying a huge annual fee of $450 a year? Chase’s exclusive Sapphire Reserve may be right up your alley.

With the Sapphire Reserve, not only will you earn 3 points per dollar spent on travel and dining (as opposed to 2 with the Sapphire Preferred), but your point value (when redeemed through the Ultimate Rewards portal) will be 1.5 cents piece. Plus, you’ll get some great luxury perks, such as a $300 annual travel credit, a fee credit for Global Entry or TSA PreCheck, and Priority Pass Select lounge access.

11) Chase Slate

Chase Slate



Compare

Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


16.99% – 25.74%, Variable

The Chase Slate card is unlike most of the cards in Chase’s portfolio in that its purpose is to help you build your credit and get out of debt. There’s no signup bonus and no rewards to earn. It’s not an exciting card, but it is a utilitarian one.

The Chase Slate card charges no fee for balances transferred to it within 60 days of opening your account. Combine that with an intro 0% APR period of 15 months, no annual fee, and free access to your FICO score, and you’ve got a card that helps smooth out your finances.

Chase currently offers 17 personal partner cards — mostly travel rewards cards. Let’s do a quick rundown of each of them.

12) Southwest Rapid Rewards Priority

If you don’t mind a $149 annual fee, Chase’s Southwest Rapid Rewards Priority card will deliver you more benefits than any other Southwest-branded card.

You’ll get 2 points per dollar spent on Southwest purchases and Rapid Rewards hotel and car rental partner purchases, and 1 point per dollar on everything else. But that’s just the beginning. You’ll also get the following:

  • 7,500 anniversary points each year
  • $75 annual Southwest travel credit
  • 4 upgraded boardings per year
  • Get 20% back on in-flight purchases
  • A host of retail and travel protections

13) Southwest Rapid Rewards Plus

The Southwest Rapid Rewards Plus card is the less-exclusive sibling of the Rapid Rewards Priority card. The annual fee is a more reasonable $69, and you’ll get some nice rewards, even if they don’t rise to the level of the Priority card’s rewards.

Just as with the priority card, you’ll get 2 points per dollar spent on Southwest purchases and Rapid Rewards hotel and car rental partner purchases and 1 point per dollar on everything else. You’ll also get an annual anniversary bonus of 3,000 points and other travel benefits. Unfortunately, there is a 3% foreign transaction fee.

14) Southwest Rapid Rewards Premier

The Southwest Rapid Rewards Premier rounds out the three Southwest-cobranded Chase personal travel cards. The Premier card has a $99 annual fee, right between that of the Plus and the Priority card. Call it the middle child of the Chase Southwest personal cards.

The points-earning structure is the same as that of the other two Southwest personal cards. Along with that, you’ll get a 6,000 point anniversary bonus each year and 1,500 tier-qualifying points for every $10,000 spent on the card each year — up to 15,000 annually. These tier-qualifying points help you reach A-List or A-List Preferred status faster than you otherwise would.

15) United Explorer

The United Explorer card is one of three United-cobranded Chase personal credit cards. Naturally, they reward traveling with United Airlines.

The United Explorer card carries an annual fee of $95 after an initial free first year. Use of the card will earn you 2 miles per $1 spent on purchases from United and on restaurants and hotel stays, and 1 mile per $1 spent on everything else. You’ll also get:

  • $100 Global Entry or TSA PreCheck fee credit
  • 25% back on United inflight purchases
  • Check your first bag for free
  • Priority boarding privileges
  • Two one-time United Club passes each year on your card anniversary

16) United TravelBank

The United TravelBank card carries no annual fee and will see you earning cash back instead of United miles. You’ll earn 2% cash back on all United purchases and 1.5% back on all other purchases.

Other United TravelBank benefits include 25% back on United inflight purchases, no foreign transaction fees, and entry into Chase’s Inside Access program through which you can get all manners of luxury perks and VIP experiences.

17) United MileagePlus Club

The United MileagePlus Club card is the luxury card of the Chase United personal credit card triumvirate. Accordingly, the annual fee is a steep $450 per year.

This card gives you all the goodies:

  • 50,000-mile sign-up bonus after you spend $3K in the first three months
  • Earn 2 miles per dollar on United spending and 1.5 miles per dollar on all other spending
  • United Club membership (a $550 value)
  • Two free checked bags per United flight
  • Priority check-in and baggage handling
  • World of Hyatt Discoverist status
  • Hertz Gold Plus Rewards President’s Circle membership
  • No foreign transaction fees

18) British Airways Visa Signature

The British Airways Visa Signature card uses Avios reward points (Avios being a currency shared by several other airlines).

You’ll earn 4 Avios points for every $1 spent on your first $30,000 in purchases within your first year. You’ll also earn 3 Avios per $1 spent on British Airways, Iberia and Aer Lingus purchases and 1 Avios per dollar spent on everything else. What’s more, if you make $30,000 in purchases on your card in a calendar year, you’ll earn a Travel Together Ticket, good for two years.

The British Airways Visa Signature card carries a $95 annual fee but has no foreign transaction fee.

19) Aer Lingus Visa Signature

For an annual fee of $95, the Aer Lingus Visa Signature card has the same Avios-earning structure as the British Airways Visa Signature card.

The card carries no foreign transaction fee, gives you priority boarding on Aer Lingus flights (the one real difference with the BA card, which gives you priority on BA flights), and a free economy ticket good for 12 months after you spend $30K in a calendar year. It’s largely the same card as the British Airways Visa Signature card (except for the branding).

20) Iberia Visa Signature

The Iberia Visa Signature card is essentially the same credit card as the previous two airline-cobranded travel cards.

The card currently has an impressive bonus offer of 100,000 Avios:

  • Earn 50,000 Avios after you spend $3,000 on purchases in the first 3 months
  • Earn an additional 25,000 Avios after you spend $10,000 on purchases in the first year
  • Earn a further 25,000 Avios after you spend $20,000 total on purchases in the first year

21) Marriott Rewards Premier Plus

The Marriott Rewards Premier Plus card is Chase’s personal version of their similarly-named Marriott business card.

Some key features:

  • $95 annual fee
  • 75,000 bonus points if you spend $3,000 in the first 3 months
  • Earn 6 points per dollar at Marriott Rewards and SPG hotels
  • Earn 2 points per dollar on all other purchases
  • Annual free night stay in a hotel up to 35,000 points

22) The World Of Hyatt

The awkwardly-named The World Of Hyatt card is a hotel travel rewards card, largely similar to the Marriott Rewards Premier Plus. There’s a bonus offer of up to 50,000 points, with free nights starting at 5,000 points. The best perk: you’ll get a free night certificate each anniversary year, good for a Category 1-4 Hyatt room.

The card carries a $95 annual fee and no foreign transaction fees.

23) Disney Premier Visa

For an annual fee of $49, the Disney Premier Visa is a card for all you Disney superfans out there. Your rewards come in the form of Disney Reward dollars.

You’ll earn 2% at gas stations, grocery stores, restaurants, and most Disney locations, and 1% on all other purchases. Your Disney Reward dollars can be redeemed toward Disney theme park visits, Disney cruises, Disney/Star Wars movies, and shopping at the Disney store. Plenty of other Disney-related perks come with the card as well.

24) Disney Visa

The Disney Visa is the down-market version of the Disney Premier Visa. There’s no annual fee, but you’ll only earn 1% Disney Reward dollars back with your purchases — a pretty meager rewards rate.

Most of the perks of the Disney Premier Visa apply to the Disney Visa.

25) IHG Rewards Club Premier

The IHG Rewards Club Premier card is a card for people who frequent IHG hotels. For an $89 annual fee, you’ll earn a whopping 10 points per dollar spent at IHG hotels. That’s a pretty impressive earning rate. However, you can’t do much with your points besides redeem them for IHG hotel stays.

26) Starbucks Rewards Visa

Finally, a credit card for you Starbucks-heads out there. Starbucks rewards come in the form of Stars, the value of which can vary based on what Starbucks item you redeem them for, though it generally comes out to about 4 cents apiece.

As a bonus offer, you’ll get 2,500 Stars after you spend $500 on purchases in the first 3 months. You’ll also get a Star for every dollar you put onto your Starbucks card using your Starbucks Reward Visa and 2 Stars for every dollar you spend using your Starbucks card, meaning you can earn 3 Stars for every dollar you spend at Starbucks assuming you literally play your cards right.

For all other purchases on your Starbucks Visa, you’ll earn a Star for every 4 dollars you spend.

27) Amazon Rewards Visa Signature

The Amazon Rewards Visa Signature card is a nice cash back card. You’ll get a $50 Amazon gift card upon being approved, and you’ll earn 3% cash back on Amazon and Whole Foods purchases, 2% cash back at gas stations, restaurants, and drugstores, and 1% cash back on all other purchases.

There’s no annual fee and no foreign transaction fee.

28) AARP Credit Card from Chase

The AARP Credit Card from Chase is a decent, if boring, cash back credit card. You don’t even need to be an AARP member to get one.

Earn 3% cash back on restaurants and gas station purchases and 1% everywhere else. For a card with no annual fee, the 3% cash back you’ll get in the aforementioned categories is pretty generous.

Final Thoughts

There you have it — a summary of every credit card Chase currently has to offer. All 28 of them!

One last thought: be wary of Chase’s 5/24 rule. It’s not an explicit policy, but more of an unwritten rule and therefore precise details are hard to come by, but generally, if you have opened 5 or more credit cards (any credit cards, not just Chase cards) over the previous 24 months, Chase will not issue you the card you’re applying for.

Now, there are a number of Chase cards that are exempt from this rule, but this group of cards has been shrinking rapidly and changes frequently, so I can’t give you a definitive list of Chase cards exempt from the 5/24 rule. Just be aware that you can’t take out an unlimited number of Chase cards to game the rewards system, nor is it recommended. Instead, you’ll have to be more strategic if you’re a rewards-hunter.

For more credit card-related information, check out the links below.

  • The Best Free Credit Score Sites
  • A Guide To Using Personal Credit Cards For Business Expenses
  • Fast Approval Business Credit Cards For Small Business Owners

The post A Complete Guide To Chase Business And Personal Credit Cards appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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How To Find Out If You Are Prequalified For A Credit Card

So you’ve decided your business needs a new credit card. Unfortunately, you’ve heard that the credit card application process can negatively impact your credit score, and since credit history can impact your business’s ability to make financial moves in the future, you don’t want to apply for a card unless you’re sure you’ll be approved.

Luckily, many issuers offer checks to see if you’re prequalified for their credit card offers. This will give you a chance to see if you should go through with applying for a card. Once you’re prequalified, you’ll have the confidence needed to go through the full-on application process.

For everything you need to know about prequalification, keep reading. We’ve got you covered!

What Does “Prequalified” Mean?

Prequalified means that you’ve been selected as potentially “qualified” by a credit card issuer for a particular card offer. Usually, the issuer has done a soft pull on your credit score and found that you’ve met the certain criteria necessary to qualify for the credit card. This soft pull should not affect your credit score.

In some cases, you may also be deemed prequalified because an issuer bought your information via a marketing list from a credit bureau. In this case, the issuer may check if you are on their list to see if you are prequalified.

If you are prequalified for a credit card, you have an 80% to 90% chance of actually qualifying for the card should you go through the application process. It’s worth adding that you don’t need to be prequalified in order to apply for a card—you can still be approved without prequalification. This process just gives you extra confidence before actually applying.

Note that by actually applying for a card, the issuer will likely perform a hard pull on your credit history. This will show up on your credit history. In most cases, a hard pull won’t be a problem long-term because having a credit card should only help your credit into the future (as long as you follow the best practices for a credit card). However, you’ll want to avoid applying for too many cards in quick succession as frequent hard pulls in a short span may lower your credit score.

How To Get Prequalified For A Credit Card

There are several ways to get prequalified for a credit card. Here are the most common:

  • Online: By far, the best option is to go to an issuer’s site and check for prequalification via their own checking tools. In most cases, this will take only a few minutes. Plus, you’ll be able to see if you qualify for a card offered by an issuer you already like. In addition, some of our favorite credit scoring-checking websites also have prequalification tools readily available for you to use.
  • By mail: Issuers frequently send out credit card offers to people who have met their prequalification criteria already. As such, if you’re looking for your next card, simply opening up your mail might be a quick and easy option. Of course, this method doesn’t offer much flexibility when it comes to what you’re preapproved for.
  • In-Person: Many physical bank branches offer prequalification checks. Note that you may already need to be a member of the bank beforehand, however. Additionally, you might be able to go to a retail store and find out during check-out if you’re prequalified for that store’s co-branded credit card.

Most major credit card issuers let anyone check online for prequalification:

  • American Express
  • Bank of America
  • Capital One
  • Chase
  • Citibank
  • Credit One
  • Discover
  • U.S. Bank

Other issuers—like Synchrony Bank, Wells Fargo, or USAA—either don’t have an online prequalification service or only let current members check online.

FAQs About Prequalified Credit Card Offers

Will getting prequalified hurt my credit score?

In almost all cases, no. This is because issuers do a soft pull on your credit history, which does not impact credit scores. Note that actually applying for a card (which causes a hard pull) will affect your credit history.

Can I get prequalified if I have bad credit?

Yes. Different issuers have different requirements when it comes to prequalifying someone for a credit card. So just because you weren’t prequalified for a particular card doesn’t mean you won’t be prequalified for another one.

Curious which credit cards are aimed towards people with bad credit? Merchant Maverick has your back.

Is there a difference between being pre-approved and prequalified?

Yes, although the difference is very slight. If you’ve been prequalified for an offer, it means that your credit score likely falls within the recommended range for a particular card. If you’ve been pre-approved, however, the issuer has targeted you more specifically for an offer.

Do I have to get prequalified before applying for a credit card?

No, becoming prequalified just gives you extra confidence before actually applying. You can still be approved for a credit card without being prequalified.

Final Thoughts

Prequalification processes can help give you peace of mind before applying for a credit card. They can potentially shield your credit score from an unnecessary hard pull and save you hassle, letting you focus on what matters—your business.

Did a check but didn’t get prequalified? Find out how to improve your credit score. Did get prequalified but want to know if that card is the right choice? Read up on our favorite business credit cards.

The post How To Find Out If You Are Prequalified For A Credit Card appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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Paypal’s Credit Cards VS PayPal’s Debit Cards

While PayPal may be best known for its online payment processing system, it also offers a range of credit and debit cards.

PayPal offers a rewards card and a couple of cards with cash back rewards, as well as a simple debit card and a prepaid card. Each offering in the PayPal stable provides a unique option, though only one of these is specifically aimed a business use. However, PayPal’s other options can certainly be used by businesses.

If you’re a business owner looking for a new credit or debit card, there’s a chance PayPal has what you’re looking for. But which one is right for your business? Find out below by reading our in-depth breakdown!

PayPal Cards Quick Comparison

Card Card Name Type Annual Fee Rewards

PayPal Extras Mastercard

Rewards $0
  • 3 points per $1 on gas and restaurant purchases
  • 2 points per $1 on PayPal and eBay purchases
  • 1 point per $1 on all other purchases

PayPal Cashback Mastercard

Cash Back $0
  • Unlimited 2% cash back on all purchases

PayPal Business Debit Mastercard

Debit $0
  • Unlimited 1% cash back on eligible purchases

PayPal Cash Card

Debit $0
  • None

PayPal Prepaid Mastercard

Prepaid $4.95 monthly fee
  • Occasional special offers and cash back rewards

PayPal Extras Mastercard: Credit Card For Earning Rewards Points

PayPal Extras Mastercard



Compare

Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


21.99% – 28.99%, Variable

If you’re keen for a rewards-centric card, PayPal offers the Extras Mastercard. This card is aimed at those who frequently shop at PayPal-accepting merchants and on eBay and offers bonus rewards for gas station and restaurant purchases.

This personal credit credit features three reward tiers:

  • 3 points per dollar spent at gas stations and restaurants
  • 2 points per dollar spent on PayPal and eBay purchases
  • 1 point per dollar spent on everything else

When you get your points, you’ll be able to score some awards. Every 6,000 points, you can choose to redeem for a $50 credit to your PayPal balance. You can also redeem points for airfare, hotel stays, car rentals, vacation packages, gift cards, or merchandise.

As a bonus, this card carries no annual fees, although you will have to pay transaction fees when traveling abroad and the APR is higher than the industry standard.

Want all the details? Check out our full PayPal Extras Mastercard review.

PayPal Cashback Mastercard: Credit Card For Cash Back

PayPal Cashback Mastercard



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Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


21.99% – 28.99%, Variable

PayPal also boasts a card with a simple reward scheme in the form of the Cashback Mastercard. This card features a straight 2% cash back across all purchases. That’s it—there are no quarterly category rotations or awkward reward rates to worry about.

This is actually one of the few credit cards on the market to rock a 2% cash back rate. This flat rate can make it an appealing choice for businesses that shop across a wide array of categories.

You’ll be able to redeem your cash back at any time in the form of PayPal balance cash. This is especially handy if you shop anywhere that accepts PayPal; however, if you intend to use your rewards elsewhere, you will have to manually transfer the balance into your bank account.

Like with the Extras Mastercard, this card has no annual fee. It also lacks a foreign transaction fee — a bonus for businesses that require international travel. However, it does include a higher-than-average APR.

If you’re curious about all this card has to offer, visit our complete review of the PayPal Cashback Mastercard.

PayPal Business Debit Mastercard: Debit Card For Instant Access To Your Business PayPal Account

PayPal Business Debit Mastercard



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Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


N/A (this is a debit card)

Beyond regular credit cards, PayPal also offers debit cards. The first of these is designed specifically to work with your Business PayPal account.

Unlike a credit card, you don’t need a credit check to receive the debit card. You also don’t need to worry about potentially paying an APR because the card simply draws from your available PayPal balance. However, you won’t be able to build up credit when using this card.

As an added bonus, PayPal gives an unlimited 1% cash back every month on eligible purchases. Purchases eligible for cash back include (but aren’t limited to) those processed as credit transactions. PIN-based transactions won’t qualify.

When buying abroad, you will be subject to a 1% foreign transaction fee. When compared to some credit cards, this fee is relatively low. However, businesses with frequent overseas travel may want to look into travel-specific credit cards.

You’ll also be able to withdraw cash via ATMs worldwide, although there is a standard $1.50 withdrawal charge. PayPal lets users request additional cards — this is handy if you’re looking to give employees debit cards. In partnership with Mastercard, there’s a zero liability policy which will help you against fraud-related charges. On top of all this, there are no annual or monthly fees to bother with.

PayPal Cash Card: Debit Card For Instant Access To Your PayPal Account

PayPal Cash Card



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Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


N/A (this is a debit card)

If you don’t have a Business PayPal Account, PayPal offers a Cash Card for personal accounts.

Just like their business alternative, this is simply a debit card and is usable wherever Mastercard is accepted. You won’t need a credit pull while applying nor will you have to worry about paying interest. However, it won’t help you build credit.

Unlike their Business Debit Mastercard, PayPal’s Cash Card does not feature any sort of reward scheme. That means this card is just for paying and withdrawing cash—you won’t be saving money using it.

It’s not possible for extra cards to be requested on the same account. Because of this, you’ll need employees to have their own PayPal accounts or go a different route entirely.

Despite those negative points, you will have protection from fraudulent charges on this card thanks to PayPal and Mastercard’s zero liability program. You also won’t be subject to annual or monthly fees like you might with some credit cards. There is, however, a 2.5% foreign transaction fee and a $2.50 withdrawal fee for ATMs outside the MoneyPass ATM network.

PayPal Prepaid Mastercard: Prepaid Card For Controlled Spending

PayPal Prepaid Mastercard



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Monthly Fee:


$4.95

 

Purchase APR:


N/A (this is a prepaid card)

PayPal’s final offering comes in the form of their Prepaid Mastercard. This reloadable card is accepted anywhere a Debit Mastercard would be accepted. That includes in-store purchases and orders over the phone or Internet.

You’ll be able to request a card without needing a credit check. Because it’s prepaid, you also don’t have to worry about any sort of interest. However, just like with the PayPal debit cards, using this prepaid card won’t enable you to improve your credit score. There is also a $4.95 plan fee due monthly.

To reload this card, you can use your PayPal balance. You can also top up at over 130,000 NetSpend Reload Network locations across the country. Additionally, there’s a direct deposit option that enables users to have paychecks, government benefits, and tax refunds directly deposited to a card’s account.

Beyond the card’s standard features, PayPal provides occasional rewards for using the Prepaid Mastercard. These rewards come in the form of money-saving offers based on your shopping history. You can also open an optional tiered-rate Savings Account through The Bancorp Bank and earn up to 5% Annual Percentage Yield (APY) for balances up to $1,000.

As another reward bonus, the PayPal Prepaid Mastercard features a refer-a-friend program. This program will give you $5 for every friend you get to sign up for the card and load $10 onto it.

Alternatives To PayPal’s Credit Cards

Don’t like PayPal? There are a few other options available. Here are Merchant Maverick’s favorite alternatives to PayPal credit cards:

Chase Ink Business Preferred



Apply Now 

Annual Fee:


$95

 

Purchase APR:


18.24% – 23.24%, Variable

Chase’s premier business rewards card is their Ink Business Preferred offering. This card is geared towards businesses focused on travel, but it has plenty of other perks, too.

You’ll collect three points per dollar spent (up to $150,000 combined) on travel, shipping purchases, Internet, cable and phone services, and on advertising purchases made with social media sites and search engines each account anniversary year. Everything else nets one point per dollar.

Points can be redeemed for 25% more value when you book travel through Chase Ultimate Rewards. There are also 80,000 bonus points handed out once you spend $5,000 in your first 3 months. Do note, however, that this card carries a $95 annual fee.

For more details, check out our complete Chase Ink Business Preferred review.

Capital One Spark Cash For Business


capital one spark cash select
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Annual Fee:


$95 ($0 the first year)

 

Purchase APR:


18.74%, Variable

For cash back, it’s hard not to like Capital One’s Spark Cash for Business. Like the PayPal Cashback Mastercard, this card doles out an unlimited 2% cash back on all purchases.

It also features a welcome offer—something not included with either of PayPal’s cards. With Spark Cash, you’ll collect a $500 cash bonus after you spend $4,500 on purchases within your first 3 months. And because it’s aimed at businesses, employee cards can be requested for free.

There is a $95 annual fee to consider, but Capital One waives it your first year. If you’re looking for a cash back card with no annual fee, Capital One also offers their Spark Cash Select with an unlimited 1.5% back.

Want the complete Spark Cash breakdown? Read the full deets with the Merchant Maverick review.

Chase Ink Business Cash



Apply Now

Annual Fee:


$0

 

Purchase APR:


15.49% – 21.49%, Variable

Chase also offers a cash back card with their Ink Business Cash. Unlike either the PayPal Cashback Mastercard or the Capital One Spark Cash for Business, this is a cash back card with a tiered reward scheme.

You can expect a whopping 5% back when you make purchases at office supply stores and on internet, cable and phone services (up to a combined $25,000). You’ll also nab 2% back when buying at gas stations and restaurants (also up to a combined $25,000). All other purchases collect 1% back.

The welcome offer grants you $500 bonus cash back after you break $3,000 on purchases in your first three months. You also won’t have to worry about interest for the first 12 months thanks to the card’s 0% introductory APR on purchases and balance transfers. Plus, there’s no annual fee to boot.

Get the full look at the Chase Ink Business Cash by reading our in-depth review.

Final Thoughts

For a business looking to get a new credit card, PayPal offers two good options. Their Extras Mastercard is a solid selection if your business frequently shops in one (or more) of the bonus categories. The Cashback Mastercard, on the other hand, is an excellent tool for businesses that don’t match up with the bonus categories of the Extras Mastercard.

If your business isn’t in the market for a credit card, but you still want to be able to swipe plastic with your PayPal account, the Business Debit Card is a great option. With easy access to PayPal funds, the ability to request additional cards, and 1% cash back, this debit card is a simple and obvious addition to any Business PayPal account.

The personal debit cards, meanwhile, might be best suited for employee personal accounts. They just don’t offer enough advantages compared to the Business Debit Mastercard. Instead, they might work best if an employee is looking for an alternative or something in addition to their bank account.

Regardless of whichever route you choose, PayPal has numerous card options for businesses looking to get more out of their PayPal account. Curious about using PayPal to accept payments? Check out our review of PayPal’s payment processing platform. If you’re considering a loan in the near future, learn more about PayPal’s Working Capital program.

The post Paypal’s Credit Cards VS PayPal’s Debit Cards appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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