How To Order QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

Most people know that QuickBooks offers accounting software, but did you know that the company also sells checks, tax forms, stamps, and even pens?

Believe it or not, QuickBooks can be your one-stop shop for business checks and office supplies. And best of all, you can print the checks directly from your QuickBooks software. Keep reading to learn more about how to order checks from QuickBooks, how to buy tax forms from QuickBooks, and what other office supplies QuickBooks offers.

Order Checks, Tax Forms & Other Supplies From QuickBooks

Products Offered

QuickBooks offers a wide array of business supplies. You can purchase the following product online using the Intuit marketplace:

  • Checks
  • Tax forms
  • Envelopes
  • Deposit slips
  • Self-inking stamps
  • Point of sale supplies
  • Laser & inkjet labels
  • Check binders
  • Printable business forms
  • Security pens

We’ll cover the specific products and their prices in each of the following sections.

Checks

QuickBooks offers five different types of checks:

  • Voucher checks
  • Standard business checks
  • Wallet checks
  • Office and away checks
  • Personal checks

You can customize QuickBooks checks by adding your business name and phone number. Choose between three and five different colors, depending on the check type. Add an additional line for extra business information and up to two signature lines to meet your business’s needs.

You can order all checks from the Intuit Market. Once the checks are sent to you, you can print them directly from compatible QuickBooks programs. Here’s a breakdown of each type of check and how much they cost.

Voucher Checks

Getting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

A voucher check is a standard-sized check accompanied by two pay stubs, making it ideal for payroll and accounts payable. Intuit offers three types of vouchers checks that vary by level of security. Each check is compatible with laser and inkjet printers and all supported versions of QuickBooks.

  • Basic Voucher Checks: Start at $36.99 for 50 checks.
  • Secure Plus Voucher Checks: Start at $66.99 for 50 checks. Adds security features like ink tampering prevention.
  • Secure Premier Voucher Checks: Start at $72.99 for 50 checks. Adds hologram for max security.

Visit the Intuit marketplace to purchase voucher checks for QuickBooks.

Standard Business Checks

Getting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

Intuit’s standard business checks are your typical, everyday business checks. Intuit offers types of standard checks that vary by level of security. Each is compatible with laser and inkjet printers and all supported versions of QuickBooks. However, standard business checks are not compatible with Intuit Online Payroll (see voucher checks instead). Intuit also offers manual standard checks that you can fill out by hand.

  • Basic Standard Business Checks: Start at $102.99 for 250 checks.
  • Secure Plus Standard Business Checks: Start at $56.99 for 50 checks. Adds security features like ink tampering prevention.
  • Secure Premier Standard Business Checks: Start at $61.99 for 50 checks. Adds hologram for max security.
  • Manual Business Checks: Start at $58.99 for 300 checks. Detachable standard checks come with check stubs to record additional information.

Visit the Intuit marketplace to find the best deals on business checks.

Wallet ChecksGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

With these checks, it’s all in the name. Intuit’s wallet checks fit perfectly in a wallet and come with a check stub to record additional information. There are two types of wallet checks that vary by level of security. Each is compatible with QuickBooks Desktop or Quicken 2006 +. Wallet checks are not compatible with QuickBooks Online.

  • Basic Wallet Checks: Start at $87.99 for 250 checks.
  • Secure Plus Wallet Checks: Start at $43.99 for 50 checks. Adds security features like ink tampering prevention.

Visit the Intuit Marketplace to purchase QuickBooks wallet checks.

Office & Away ChecksGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

Intuit’s Office & Away checks are a hybrid between standard checks and manual checks. You can either print checks directly from QuickBooks when you’re in the office or handwrite checks when you’re out of the office. Office & Away checks are compatible with laser and inkjet printers and QuickBooks Desktop; they are not compatible with QuickBooks Online or Intuit Payroll (see voucher checks for payroll).

  • Office & Away Checks: Start at $90.99 for 250 checks.

Visit the Intuit Marketplace to purchase Office & Away checks for your business.

Personal ChecksGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

In addition to business checks, Intuit offers personal checks as well. There is only one type of personal check — the Secure Plus Personal Check — which comes with built-in security features like chemically reactive paper to prevent check alterations. QuickBooks personal checks are not compatible with software like QuickBooks or Quicken and are not compatible with printers.

  • Secure Plus Personal Checks: Starts at $39.99 for one box, which contains 120 duplicate checks.

Visit the Intuit Marketplace to find the best deal on personal checks.

Tax Forms

You can purchase four different types of tax forms directly from Intuit:

  • W-2s
  • W-3s
  • 1096s
  • 1099-MISCs

One of the biggest perks of using QuickBooks software is the tax support available with both QuickBooks Desktop and QuickBooks Online.  QuickBooks Desktop allows you to prepare and print w-2s, W-3s, 1099-MISCs, and 1096s, and with the QuickBooks Online Plus plan you can prepare and print 1099-MISCs and W-2s directly from the software.

Most users will need to purchase these forms from Intuit in order to print and file their taxes, although certain QuickBooks payroll plans include these forms with the cost of the monthly payroll subscription (read our QuickBooks Desktop Payroll Pricing And Features post to see if your tax forms are included or not). Here are the current tax form offerings (note: prices may vary depending on the tax year).

W-2sGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

A W-2 form is an IRS tax form that indicates an employee’s wages and withheld taxes for the tax year. Employers are required to fill out a W-2 form for every individual employee they have (or had) during the tax year. Intuit offers two different W-2 kits to help employer’s successfully complete their W-2s. The price for each option depends on the number of forms needed.

  • Pre-Printed W-2 Kit: Starts at $57.99 and includes four free W-3s and custom W-2 envelopes. Compatible with laser or inkjet printers and QuickBooks Desktop users with Basic or Enhanced Payroll. Not compatible with QuickBooks for Mac, QuickBooks Online, QuickBooks Desktop Payroll Full Service, or QuickBooks Online Payroll.
  • Laser W-2 Blank Perforated Paper & Envelope Kit: Starts at $23.99 and includes blank, perforated W-2 paper and custom W-2 envelopes. Compatible with QuickBooks Online, QuickBooks Payroll, QuickBooks Online Payroll Full Service, and supported version of QuickBooks Desktop.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to easily order W-2 tax forms for your business.

W-3sGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

A W-3 form is an IRS tax form that indicates the total wages and taxes withheld for all employees of a company during the tax year. If you purchase the Pre-Printed W-2 Kit, then you will already receive four free W-3 forms; otherwise, you can purchase them directly from Intuit.

  • W-3 Forms: Start at $17.99 for 10 preprinted W-3 forms. Not compatible with QuickBooks for Mac or QuickBooks Online.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order W-3 tax forms.

1099-MISCsGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

A 1099-MISC form is an IRS form that reports wages paid to an individual who is not an employee at your company, such as an independent contractor.  As the employer, you’ll need to file a 1099-MISC for any contractors you’ve paid more than $600 during the tax year. You can purchase these forms directly from Intuit and prepare and print them directly from QuickBooks. Prices vary by state and depending on the number of forms you need.

  • 1099 Kit: Ranges from $58.99 – $83.99 for 10 pre-printed 1099-MISC forms and includes four free 1096 forms and custom 1099 envelopes (price varies by state). Compatible with QuickBooks Online, and supported version of QuickBooks Desktop and QuickBooks Mac.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order 1099 tax forms.

1096sGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

A 1096 form is an IRS form that records all of the wages paid to all independent contractors and self-employed individuals a company hired during the tax year. If you purchase the 1099 Kit, then you will already receive four free 1096 forms; otherwise, you can purchase them directly from Intuit.

  • 1096 Forms: Start at $17.99 for 10 1096 forms. Compatible with QuickBooks Online Plus, QuickBooks Mac 2013 or later, and QuickBooks Desktop 2013 or later.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order 1096 tax forms.

Envelopes

You can purchase envelopes for your checks, tax forms, and more directly from Intuit. While you could buy envelopes from anywhere, Intuit envelopes are specifically designed to fit your Intuit checks and tax forms, which adds an added layer of security to important mail. Here are the various business envelopes offered and how much they cost.

Standard & Voucher Check EnvelopesGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

According to QuickBooks:

Standard-sized business envelopes don’t fit standard sized checks. Envelopes can be too large, potentially allowing sliding inside the envelope that can compromise security or partially obstruct information.

This is why Intuit sells envelopes that are created to fit their standard and voucher checks perfectly. There are two types of standard/voucher envelopes that vary by level of convenience.

  • Standard/Voucher & Payroll Check Envelopes: Start at $68.99 for 250 envelopes. Includes double address windows.
  • Self-Seal Voucher Check Envelopes: Start at $30.99 for 50 envelopes. Fits both standard and voucher checks. Includes self-adhesive flaps and double address windows. Compatible with most postage machines.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order standard check and voucher check envelopes.

Wallet Check EnvelopesGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

Wallet check envelopes are designed specifically to fit Intuit’s wallet checks. There are two types of wallet checks that vary by size.

  • Wallet Check Envelopes: Start at $49.99 for 250 envelopes. Includes double address windows. Specifically designed to fit wallet checks.
  • Wallet Plus Check Envelopes: Start at $54.99 for 250 envelopes. This standard sized envelope includes a pocket designed specifically for wallet checks, so you can send both wallet checks and additional documents simultaneously.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order wallet check envelopes.

Form EnvelopesGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

In addition to purchasing envelopes that fit Intuit’s checks, you can also purchase envelopes that perfect fit your Intuit tax forms, including W-2s, W-3s, 1096s, and 1099-MISCs. These envelopes are designed to align perfectly with the Intuit tax forms to ensure that your confidential tax information stays secure. There are three different type of form envelopes available. Each is compatible with Intuit’s pre-printed tax forms or any other forms printed on standard printer paper.

  • Forms Envelopes: Start at $68.99 for 250 envelopes. Includes double address windows.
  • Single Window Form Envelopes: Start at $73.99 for 250 envelopes. Includes a single address window. You can order them to be pre-printed with your company address. Adding a company logo or custom ink color costs extra.
  • Self-Seal Form Envelopes: Start at $75.99 for 250 envelopes. Includes self-adhesive flaps and double address windows. Compatible with most postage machines.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order from envelopes for your small business.

Business Reply EnvelopesGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

You can purchase a custom, pre-printed return envelope from Intuit. Adding a return envelope to your invoices can help your company appear more professional and make it easier for your customers to send you their invoice payments (and anything you can do to increase the chances of your invoices getting paid is worth it). Intuit’s business reply envelopes also work with their Remittance Statements (which we’ll cover later). Here’s how much they cost.

  • Business Reply Envelopes: Start at $54.99 for 250 envelopes. You can order them to be pre-printed with your company address.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to start sending business reply envelopes with your invoices.

Large Mailing EnvelopesGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

Additionally, you can purchase large mailing envelopes for large stacks of paper or for forms and documents that you do not wish to bend. These envelopes come in white or golden brown (think classic manila envelope).

  • Large Mailing Envelopes: Start at $90.99 for 100 envelopes. You can order them to be pre-printed with your company address. Adding a company logo or custom ink color costs extra.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order large mailing envelopes.

Deposit SlipsGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

Deposit slips are used by some businesses to track the funds deposited into a specific bank account. Deposit slips can be helpful when verifying your accounting records with your monthly bank statement. If your business is in the habit of using deposit slips (or if you’d like to start), you can purchase them directly from Intuit. Intuit offers two different types of deposit slips as well as a deposit slip bag. Here’s how much each item costs.

  • Printable Deposit Slips: Start at $68.99 for 250 deposit slips with up to 18 entries per slip. Prepare and print directly from QuickBooks. Compatible with QuickBooks Mac 2007 or higher and supported versions of QuickBooks Desktop.
  • Booked Manual Deposit Slips: Start at $43.99 for 200 deposit slips with up to 18 entries per slip. For manual entry. Available in 2- or 3-copy carbonless options. Can order your business name and account number to be pre-printed on the slips.
  • Bank Deposit Bag: Starts at $12.99 for 25 deposit bags. Disposable and recyclable bag with removable numbered receipts and built-in security features.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order deposit slips for your business.

Stamps

Whether it’s addressing envelopes, marking invoices as past due, or indicating which documents need filing, Intuit offers 14 self-inking maps to make your business processes run smoother. These affordable business stamps are easy to use and can save your company valuable time. In addition to the stamps, Intuit also offers ink-pad refills for whenever you might need them.

Self-Inking Business Stamps

As we mentioned above, Intuit offers 14 stamps ranging from $13.99 to $35.99 each. Here are all of the business stamps available.

  • Endorsement Stamp: Costs $35.99 and is ideal for quickly getting checks ready to deposit.
  • Return Address Stamp: Costs $35.99 and comes with up to five lines of text.
  • Return Address Stamp With Monogram: Costs $35.99 and Getting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Suppliescomes with up to five lines of text and a monogram letter.
  • Fax Header Cover Stamp: Costs $35.99 and is ideal for quickly creating a fax header to record fax information.
  • Getting Started With QuickBooks Checks And SuppliesSecurity Stamp: Costs $21.99 and is created to “obscure sensitive information on checks, forms, legal documents, packages, and mail.”
  • Copy Stamp: Red ink stamp that says “copy” and costs $13.99.
  • Past Due Stamp: Red ink stamp that says “past due” and costs $13.99. Ideal for invoices.
  • Draft Stamp: Red ink stamp that says “draft” and costs $13.99.Getting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies
  • File Stamp: Red ink stamp that says “file” and costs $13.99.
  • Void Stamp: Blue ink stamp that says “void” and costs $13.99. Ideal for voided checks.
  • Paid Stamp: Red ink stamp that says “paid” and costs $13.99. Ideal for invoices.
  • Confidential Stamp: Red ink stamp that says “confidential” and costs $13.99.Getting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies
  • Faxed Stamp: Red ink stamp that says “faxed” and costs $13.99.
  • Urgent Stamp: Red ink stamp that says “urgent” and costs $13.99.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order business stamps.

Point Of Sale Supplies

If you use QuickBooks Point of Sale (see our review) there are several items you can purchase to manage your business and sales. Intuit offers everything from pricing labels to receipt tape to jewelry tags and more. See what point of sale supplies Intuit has to offer and how much they cost below.

Pricing Labels

Getting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

If you need a quick and efficient way your items, you can print pricing labels directly from QuickBooks POS using a compatible printer. These labels are adhesive for easy tagging and come in two separate sizes.

  • Price Label 1.2″ x 0.85″: Costs $79.99 for one case of pricing labels, which comes with 12 rolls per case and 15,000 labels per roll. Compatible with the QuickBooks POS Tag Printer. Ideal for smaller items.
  • Price Label 2.25″ x 1.25″: Costs $79.99 for one case of pricing labels, which comes with 12 rolls and 1,135 labels per roll. Compatible with the QuickBooks POS Tag Printer. Ideal for larger items.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order QuickBooks pricing labels.

Receipt Paper

Getting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

You can also purchase receipt paper directly from Intuit. QuickBooks receipt paper is compatible with QuickBooks POS printer, the Star TSP143, and the Star TSP613.

  • Point Of Sale Paper Rolls: Costs $29.99 for 10 rolls. Each roll is 220 feet long.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace for a great deal on receipt paper.

Pricing TagsGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

In addition to pricing labels, Intuit also sells pricing tags for unique items like jewelry.

  • Printable Hang Tags: Costs $104.97 per case of thermal printed hang tags, with 12 rolls per case and 967 labels per roll. Ideal for “purses, clothing, and other fabric items.” Compatible with supported versions of QuickBooks POS and QuickBooks POS Tag Printer.
  • Jewelry Tags With Flap: Costs $104.99 for four rolls of waterproof jewelry tags, with 2,490 labels per roll. Includes adhesive flaps that allow you to price items without getting sticky adhesive on them. Compatible with supported versions of QuickBooks POS and QuickBooks POS Tag Printer.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order pricing tags for your retail company.

Labels

You can also purchase printable labels directly from the Intuit MarketPlace. You can use these labels for a variety of purposes, whether it’s preprinting potential lead addresses for a new marketing campaign or printing file folder names to get your business organized. Here’s all that Intuit has to offer:

Printable Business LabelsGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

Intuit offers printable, adhesive labels in various sizes. Each set of labels starts at $40.99. These labels are compatible with laser and inkjet printers. You can design and print the labels straight from QuickBooks Desktop or by using Avery. Not compatible with QuickBooks Online.

  • 1″ x 4″ Labels: Cost $40.99 for 100 sheets with 20 labels per sheet. Compatible with laser and inkjet printers as well as Avery #5161 and #8161.
  • 1 1/3″ x 4″ Labels: Cost $40.99 for 100 sheets with 14 labels per sheet. Compatible with laser and inkjet printers as well as Avery #5162.
  • 2″ x 4″ Labels: Cost $40.99 for 100 sheets with 10 labels per sheet. Compatible with laser and inkjet printers as well as Avery #5163.
  • 3 1/3″ x 4″ Labels: Cost $40.99 for 100 sheets with 6 labels per sheet. Compatible with laser and inkjet printers as well as Avery #5164.
  • 1″ x 2 5/8″ Labels: Cost $40.99 for 100 sheets with 30 labels per sheet. Compatible with laser and inkjet printers as well as Avery #5160 and #8160.
  • 1/2″ x 1 3/4″ Labels: Cost $40.99 for 100 sheets with 80 labels per sheet. Compatible with laser and inkjet printers as well as Avery #5167.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order printable labels for all of your business needs.

Shipping Manager LabelsGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

QuickBooks also offers adhesive labels specifically designed for overnight, express, or ground shipping. These labels are compatible with laser and inkjet printers and integrate with both QuickBooks Desktop and QuickBooks Shipping Manager. Not compatible with QuickBooks Online.

  • QuickBooks Shipping Manager Labels: Cost $40.99 for 100 sheets, with two labels per sheet.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order shipping labels.

File Folder LabelsGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

In addition to the above labels, Intuit also offers labels that are specifically designed to fit your file cabinet folders to help you stay organized. These labels are compatible with laser and inkjet printers. You can design and print the labels straight from QuickBooks Desktop or by using Avery. Not compatible with QuickBooks Online.

  • 2/3″ x 3 7/16″ File Folder Labels: Cost $40.99 for 100 sheets, with 30 labels per sheet. Compatible with laser and inkjet printers as well as Avery #5366.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order file folder labels and start getting organized today.

Business Forms

While both QuickBooks Desktop and QuickBooks Online offer an incredible number of reports, there are some important business forms that you may want to mail your customers. That’s why QuickBooks offers nine additional business forms. Check out all of the forms QuickBooks offers and how much they cost.

StatementsGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

QuickBooks statement forms allow you to keep your customers up to date on their financial obligations and history with your company. There are three business statement forms in total. You can print each directly from QuickBooks Desktop. Compatible with laser and inkjet printers.

  • Customer Billing Statements: Start at $64.99 for 250 statements. Ideal for updating customers on their account.
  • Remittance Statements: Start at $88.99 for 250 statements. Ideal for tracking accounts receivable.
  • Blank Remittance Statements: Start at $40.99 for 250 statements.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to check out a good deal on business forms.

InvoicesGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

For companies wishing to send invoices by mail in addition to or instead of sending invoices online, there’s the option to buy preprinted invoice templates directly from Intuit. There are three invoice styles that you can customize to fit your business’s needs. You can print the invoice’s details onto each invoice directly from QuickBooks Desktop. Compatible with laser and inkjet printers. Price varies depending on the number of invoices purchased and the number of sheets per invoice.

  • Product Invoices: Starts at $88.99 for 250 invoices. Available in single, duplicate, triplicate, or quadruplicate. Ideal for product-based businesses.
  • Service Invoices: Start at $88.99 for 250 invoices. Available in single, duplicate, or triplicate. Ideal for service-based businesses.
  • Professional Invoices: Start at $88.99 for 250 invoices. Available in single and triplicate.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order QuickBooks 1096 tax forms.

Multi-Purpose FormsGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

The multi-purpose form, as you may have guessed, has multiple potential uses. Intuit says that you can use these forms to:

Send estimates, credit memos, or purchase orders on professional-looking correspondence.

There are two multi-purpose forms available. Each can be printed directly from QuickBooks and are compatible with laser and inkjet printers.

  • Multi-Purpose Forms: Start at $88.99 for 250 forms. Available in single, duplicate, or triplicate.
  • All Purpose Form With Peel-Off Label: Start at $46.99 for 250 forms. Includes adhesive label so you can prepare reports and packing slips simultaneously.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order multi-purpose business forms now.

Form LeadersGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

The form leader helps you easily print “leftover” standard or wallet checks. You simply attach a remaining check to the form leader and print using compatible laser and inkjet printers. This saves you both time and money and ensures all leftover checks are used and printed properly.

  • Form Leaders: Costs $19.99 for 10 from leaders. Each form leader is good for up to 40 uses.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order a form leader for your standard or wallet-sized checks.

Other

Finally, Intuit also offers a few miscellaneous business items to help your office stay organized and run smoothly. Here are the final three products you can find within the Intuit MarketPlace.

BindersGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

Intuit offers two type of binders to help you keep your business checks organized. In addition to keeping your checks in order, these binders can also help you appear more professional and put together. Here’s how much they cost.

  • Office & Away Checkbook Binder: Costs $69.99 and is designed to hold up to 75 office and away checks. Includes “a handy check register, a business card pocket, a place to store important documents, and a convenient pen holder.”
  • 7-Ring Manual Check Binder: Costs $30.99 and is designed to hold manual business checks. Available in burgundy or black.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order a professional business binder.

PensGetting Started With QuickBooks Checks And Supplies

Intuit pens are specifically designed to ensure that your checks remain secure. They have unwashable ink and leave indent marks on paper to prevent check fraud.

  • QuickBooks Super Ink Security Pen: Costs $10.99 for five pens. Includes a comfortable textured grip and black ink.

Visit the Intuit MarketPlace to order a secure check pen.

Get Shopping

Now you officially know all of the business checks and office supplies available to you through the Intuit MarketPlace. The Intuit MarketPlace is a great way to find business checks, personal checks, tax forms, check envelopes, invoices, business labels, and more. You may even receive a discount for purchasing certain items like checks and envelopes together.

Once you place your order, Intuit says that most items will be shipped in 49 hours, though some custom items may take up to six days to ship.

You can always call Intuit Checks & Supplies support at (866) 570-3842 or start shopping now.

Shop For QuickBooks Checks & Supplies Now

Using an old version of QuickBooks Pro? Save $100 when you upgrade to QuickBooks Desktop 2018.

Purchase QuickBooks Desktop Pro 2018 

 

The post How To Order QuickBooks Checks And Supplies appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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Useful Online Portfolio Examples for Students, Teachers, and Professionals

Online Portfolio

When it comes to having an online portfolio of work — whether for designs, papers, case studies, or your work history — a well-designed portfolio goes a long way in leaving a lasting impression.

But what does a good portfolio look like?

I’ve gathered 9+ useful online portfolio examples for students, teachers, and professionals to serve as inspiration for your portfolio website. But before we go too far, let’s talk best practices:

Portfolio Page Best Practices

So what makes a good portfolio website? While the opportunities for displaying your work are endless, there are a few best practices to keep in mind when designing your portfolio. Here are some key elements of a great online portfolio:

  • Clarity over Creativity: It’s easy to get caught up in showcasing your creativity on your portfolio. Adding some extra flair to stand out is fine… until it sacrifices clarity. Your portfolio website’s main goal should be to clearly show who you are, what you do, and what you’ve done.
  • Easy Navigation: Your portfolio should be easy to navigate. Prioritize key pages in your navigation like Work, About, and Contact.
  • A Strong Bio: An online portfolio doesn’t just show visitors what you’ve done… it also tells them who you are. A strong About Me page is a great way to share your bio and give visitors a glimpse into what you’re all about.
  • Current Work: Your portfolio should feature your most recent work. When choosing how to set up your portfolio page, make sure you choose a format you can easily update whenever you complete a project you’d like to feature.
  • Next Steps: What action do you want people to take once they review your portfolio? Should they contact you? Follow you on social media? Request a quote? Make it clear what a visitor should do next with a strong call to action.
  • Showcase Abilities: Your portfolio is the perfect place to practice what you preach and showcase your abilities. For example, if you’re a web designer, use your portfolio website to show your design style. Use the site as an opportunity to display your work in action.

Online Portfolio Examples

Now that you’ve got the basics down, it’s time to get creating. Here are 9+ useful portfolio examples to use for inspiration.

Min Zhou, Product Designer

min zhou portfolio

A great portfolio doesn’t have to be elaborate. In fact, sometimes a simple, straightforward approach works best. Min Zhou’s portfolio is a great example of this.

Notice how the navigation is ultra-simple. It features two options: Work and About. Min then leads with a straightforward headline that instantly tells you who he is and what he does. Below that, he showcases his work in a clear grid format that allows you to dive deeper when clicking on each square.

 

Sean Halpin, Web Designer

Sean Halpin Portfolio

A portfolio is a great place to show your abilities in action, especially in web-based industries like design and development. This portfolio by Sean Halpin is a great example of showing your skills and style within the portfolio itself.

Sean’s portfolio website gives off an immediate impression of his design style, while also showing his depth in his work section.

 

Pascal van Gemert, Web Developer

Pascal van Gemert Portfolio

Similar to Sean, this interactive portfolio by Pascal van Gemert is another example of integrating your work into your website. Pascal uses his development skills to create an interactive site that uses unique ways to communicate information, like this start system that shows his experience in certain areas.

 

Emma Kay, Creative Director + Stylist

Emma Kay Portfolio
What makes this portfolio unique is the use of segmentation. If you have work across multiple industries, like Emma Kay does, segmenting your portfolio by industry can be a great way to help visitors find the most relevant projects.

emma kay portfolio segmentedEmma also uses a swipe scroll to help visitors easily browse her work. The design is sleek and provides a great user experience, which is the hallmark of a great website.

 

Brett Bergeron, Designer, Developer, and Creative Director

Brett Bergeron Portfolio

Portfolios don’t always have to be about the visuals. This portfolio by Brett Bergeron uses large text on the homepage to tell you exactly who he is, what he does, and who he works with. It takes up the entire “above the fold” portion of the homepage (jargon for the entire screen before scrolling). If you want to learn more about him, you can scroll down to the navigation and the video, which adds a great balance to the text-heavy homepage.

Brett Portfolio

 

Charlie Waite, Designer

Charlie Waite portfolio

Charlie’s portfolio stands out for two primary reasons. First is the color scheme. The use of complementary colors makes his portfolio pop — your eye is immediately draw to the yellow and then directly down to the blue section below it, which features another project.

Second is his call-to-action. Instead of using something generic, like “Contact”, Charlie goes with a much warmer “Say Hello!”, which matches the overall warm vibe of his portfolio page.

Keep in mind that a strong CTA doesn’t mean a boring CTA — it just has to be clear!

 

Robert Brown Interior Design

robert brown interior design portfolio Sometimes less is more, which is exactly what makes this portfolio stand out. As an interior designer, displaying multiple, large-scale projects with several photos can quickly turn a portfolio into photography overload. Robert Brown Interior Design’s approach is much more manageable. The simple grid layout showcases individual projects and creates a cohesive style on the portfolio page. If a visitor wants to see more photos related to a specific project, they can just click on the main photo to open the gallery.

Robert Brown Interior Design portfolio

 

Sparkle Tafao, Makeup Artist + Hair Stylist

Sparkle Tafao makeup portfolio

For some industries, like beauty and photography, a portfolio website might not be the primary place to showcase work. Instead, you may rely more on a social channel like Instagram. However, that doesn’t mean you should ignore your website (you still need to have a web presence that you own!). This portfolio by Sparkle Tafao is a great example of how to leverage your website to direct visitors to another channel. When you land on Sparkle’s homepage, you have two options: you can visit her portfolio, or you can check her out on Instagram.

 

Kathryne Bevilacqua, Professor

Kathryne Bevilacqua professor portfolio

This professor’s portfolio is another example of balancing creativity with clarity. Kathryne Bevilacqua uses an interactive menu to jump you down her website, and adds a fun design component with her teaching timeline. However, the information is still easy to consume and find. The portfolio also includes a downloadable PDF for visitors who want to learn more about her teaching.

Remember, your portfolio is a starting point for people to learn about you and your work. You don’t have to include everything on one page. Use it as a entry point and invite visitors deeper.

 

Takeaways + Next Steps

No matter your line of work or purpose – having an accessible portfolio online is essential.

As far as how to get your portfolio online though, there’s plenty of options. I created a guide to the best website builders here, although the go-to options that I recommend are –

  • WordPress.com – user-friendly option with good functionality, customer service, bundled hosting – and the option to migrate to a self-hosted website in the future. See their Portfolios functionality.
  • Self-hosted WordPress – allows for maximum ownership and versatility, but has a bit of a learning curve. Learn how to set up WordPress here.
  • Weebly – a drag and drop website builder with straightforward setup and a free plan option. See Weebly here.

Have a successful project!

The post Useful Online Portfolio Examples for Students, Teachers, and Professionals appeared first on ShivarWeb.

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Harvesting Demand vs. Creating Demand

Creating Demand vs Harvesting Demand

When it comes to most digital channels (think your typical online marketing activities), the focus is often on getting in front of customers who know they need your products/services.

Here’s the catch: eventually, you run into limitations. Why? Because you’re working with existing demand, and existing demand is always limited.

Which means at some point, you’re going to have to create demand for your offering.

But how do you do that? And do you have to choose one versus the other?

Before we dive in too deep, let’s break down the difference between harvesting demand vs. creating demand.

Harvesting Demand vs. Creating Demand

Think of harvesting demand like matchmaking — you’re finding people who are already interested in your product, service, or brand and matching them to whatever you’re offering.

Like I mentioned above, most digital channels focus exclusively on harvesting existing demand. Think about it — both SEO and PPC rely on search volume, which means someone needs to be actively searching for specific terms related to your offering.

There are so many ways to harvest search volume more effectively that the companies that do it well find it to be so cost effective (and generally effective) that they never need to do anything else.

But the truth of the matter is you will always be limited by existing demand — which is where creating demand comes in.

Creating demand is creating new customers who didn’t even know they wanted your product or service. There are infinite possibilities when creating demand… it just happens to be much harder than leveraging existing interest.

At the end of the day, you want to pair them. The key is to know which marketing activities do what and how these two techniques support each other. Let’s break it down a bit further.

How to Harvest Demand

If you’re marketing your business online, chances are you’re already focusing on harvesting demand. That’s because harvesting demand is traditional “inbound” marketing.

Harvesting demand involves two steps – finding where the demand is, and showing up there.

I’ve written dozens of posts about this topic. Here are a few –

  • How To Create an Inbound Marketing Plan for a Local Business.
  • How To Create an Inbound Marketing Plan for Ecommerce.
  • Beginner’s Guide to Keyword Research.
  • How to Find Pre-Qualified Content Ideas.
  • How To Find Trending Social Media Topics.
  • How To Advertise Online Effectively.
  • Here’s an entire podcast on the topic.
  • Most of my newsletter reading recommendations revolve around this theme.

How to Create Demand

Creating demand is a completely different beast. Again, the opportunities are endless. The key is to make people want and need something they didn’t even know they wanted and/or needed.Which, of course, is more difficult than leveraging what people already know they want.

Creating demand can be done in a plethora of ways, but whichever methods you choose, you need two main elements:

A Strong Pitch + Hook

Creating a strong pitch and hook is really a balancing act. If people don’t think there’s a problem, they won’t invest in your solution. But if they don’t think the problem you’re presenting is areal problem, then they also won’t invest in your solution.

And if you can’t make them see theyneed it (which is an emotional response), then they’re definitely not buying.

Take these pet hair removal gloves byPet Ninja. I’m seeing these ads everywhere. Now, as a dog owner, I can appreciate a great grooming tool. But I would never go out of my way to find gloves that would groom my dog as I pet him.

dog hair brush gloves

www.petninja.com

What makes their demand generation strategy so effective is their pitch. Pet Ninja doesn’t craft some imaginary problem (e.g. they don’t try to take a stand against dog brushes). They merely focus on how annoying shedding is, and how their product makes it easy to get rid of it.

They also rope me in with an emotional hook. Look how happy my dog would be without all that extra fur! And he’ll feel like I’m petting him — it’s a win-win!

Another memorable example is the Squatty Potty that went viral in 2017.

Would you ever imagine needing a product to help your toilet posture for better bowel movements? No?

Exactly the point. And yet Squatty Potty created demand out of thin air with a totally new product category that had people going nuts.

The takeaway? A strong pitch outlines a clear problem, but doesn’t over do it. A strong hook adds in emotion. Combine the two, and you won’t just have a new customer… you’ll have a brand advocate.

Urgency / Scarcity

People want what they can’t have. There’s a reason the urgency/scarcity sales tactic has been around forever and is still used: it works!

Something amazing happens you’ve made people realize they need what you’ve haveandyou’ve made them feel emotionally invested, but you tell them they can’t have it yet… people go crazy.

Think about the iPhone — this is essentially the example for creating demand. Before the iPhone, no one gave a thought to needing a smartphone. Now, it’s more necessary than ever.

When Steve Jobs’ first announced this brand new device (that no one knew they wanted or needed), it was a full 6 months before it even launched. Today, Apple is the world’s 2nd largest company because they’ve been able to create their own demand AND add urgency AND create artificial scarcity through constant upgrades. And the best part? They do it over and over and over with each of their products: iPod, iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, EarPods.

You can create urgency or scarcity in numerous ways — delaying a launch, creating a reservation system, limiting the number of orders. The goal is to make people take action… but only after you’ve made it so they can’t live without whatever you’ve got.

Putting It All Together (Takeaways and Next Steps)

Harvesting vs. creating demand shouldn’t be a this or that situation. It should be all about theand. These two techniques should work together in your marketing strategy.

For example, say you’re selling wood earrings. Your guest post on a beauty blog that doesn’t feature earrings may be designed to generate demand around your product, but this same guest post may also help you rank for the same term for those who are already searching for it.

Inventing branded terms work well here, too. Let’s stick with the jewelry example. Let’s say you invent the term “Angular Jewelry” to describe a class of jewelry, and you generate a ton of demand for it. If that term takes off, you can then harvest demand from it way more easily than you could a generic term.

So what do you do now? For immediate next steps, take a look at your own marketing activities. Where are you harvesting existing demand, and where can you start generating demand.  Bucket your activities and look for opportunities to create a symbiotic relationship.

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Complete Guide To Credit Card Machines And Terminals

We don’t typically think about what happens in the moments after we swipe our debit and/or credit cards. More often than not, we simply run or insert our card into the credit card machine and hope that the cashier doesn’t use the next few moments to initiate small talk. The number in our checking account decreases or the number on our credit card bill increases, and that’s all we care about.

But, to the business owner, credit card processing is exceptionally important and it can play a huge role in your bottom line. There’s a lot of information to take in if you’re a novice when it comes to credit card processing, and you’ll need to decide what elements are most important to your business. Do you need mobility when accepting payments? Will you be accepting transactions online or over the phone? What security measures should you be taking to protect both your business and your customers? What companies are highly rated or come heavily recommended?

We’ll try and answer the bulk of your questions about credit card machines and terminals below.

Credit Card Machines

Credit card technology has evolved rapidly over the years. It doesn’t seem like that long ago when the process involved a terminal with just the option for credit. Then came debit cards. As the internet became the world’s go to for conducting business, the processing game had to change as well. Now, merchants can take payments with readers connected to their phones or tablets — they can even accept payments remotely without the physical card present. This has created a need for increased security which has led to encryption technology and the relatively recent advent of the EMV chip card.

Before we get into that, however, let’s start with some basics about credit card transactions. You have, no doubt, used hundreds of different types of card readers throughout your illustrious tenure as a consumer. But what happens once your card’s magnetic strip has been read? In simple terms, there are three phases involved in actual processing:

  • Authorization: Once your card is scanned, its information is sent over with a request to be processed. The processing request is then sent to the company of the cardholder (VISA, Mastercard etc…). The company sends the request on to the issuing bank. If there are enough funds in the account, and if the card is registered as valid, the purchase is approved. All of this takes place in a matter of seconds, generally speaking.
  • Settling: After a transaction has been approved, it is forwarded on to be cleared via an interchange. When the request is received, a credit is given to the merchant for the amount of the sale. The bank will then issue a statement to the customer in that amount which the customer must then pay off.
  • Funding: So far in the transaction, no actual money has changed hands. After the card has been authorized and the credit is issued, the payment company then makes a deposit into the merchant’s checking account. These funds can generally be accessed in just a few days.

In order to accept these forms of payment, you will need some type of card reader. Your options here have also evolved rapidly in the past couple of decades. The most common type of credit card machine is still the stationary card terminal. This is a machine that needs a physical connection either to a phone line or to the internet in order to process physical cards.

The next type of machine, and one that is rapidly gaining in popularity, is the wireless processor. These often look very similar to a stationary device, using a magnetic strip or chip reader to take a customer’s card information. However, these devices only require a wireless connection, making them far more versatile and mobile for merchants (albeit with slightly higher security concerns).

Finally, you can also accept payments via a virtual terminal, something we’ll get into more thoroughly a little bit later. In short, virtual terminals allow you to take a customer’s card information without that card being physically present.

Of course, within these different machines, you’ll have some other hardware choices to make. One item you may want to look into is a PIN pad. With this device, customers can manually type in their debit card password to process a payment. Debit cards with either a VISA or Mastercard logo can be processed almost identically to credit cards. However, with a PIN pad, a transaction that is specifically run as debit usually costs the merchant a smaller fee. This ends up saving you a lot of money in the long run, particularly on large transactions.

Some point of sale systems have this technology built-in, allowing customers to enter their PIN numbers on a touchscreen. PIN pads encrypt a customer’s information, giving an inherent level of security on those transactions. As previously mentioned, you don’t need a PIN pad to run these types of transactions. A signature debit card is processed just like a credit card, but the money comes directly from a customer’s checking account. However, in most instances, the merchant is still charged the same rate as if the transaction was run as credit.

One of the more recent changes in the world of credit card processing has been the introduction of the chip card. EMV (which stands for Europay, Mastercard, VISA) is a method of payment based on a standard for cards and machines that is meant to dramatically reduce the possibility for fraud when it comes to credit card payments. EMV cards store data in a chip within the card that is scanned when it is “dipped” or inserted into a card reader or payment machine. Companies have been steadily trying to meet EMV standards and the majority of processors and point of sale companies are now EMV compliant or claim to be in the process of becoming compliant in the near future. VISA and Mastercard have also issued standards for card-not-present transactions as a way to increase security measures in the world of eCommerce.

It’s difficult to predict what the future will look like when it comes to payment processing, but one trend that seems like a near sure bet is that consumers will continue to seek out convenience. This means that services like Apple and Android Pay will probably continue to spike in popularity. Given society’s increased dependence on iPhones for everything from communication to driving directions, the ability to pay with one’s phone is something all companies will want to make sure they can handle — sooner rather than later.

Looking for a credit card machine for your business? Buy, don’t lease! 

Virtual Terminals

What is a virtual terminal? Let’s delve in deeper to get a sense of whether or not it’s a solution your business needs. Virtual terminals are online applications that allow customers to input credit card information directly online to then be processed electronically. These terminals allow for transactions to be processed even when a credit card is not physically present. This can be an ideal solution for any business that is highly mobile or conducting transactions remotely with clients.

Many companies, including PayPal and Helcim, offer the ability to use a virtual terminal for payments. The implementation process is exceedingly simple. Generally, for a small, monthly fee, your processor can give you the ability to enter payment information from pretty much anywhere with an internet connection. Most companies will offer a percentage rate and a flat fee for virtual terminal transactions. This fee is often slightly higher than it would be for a typical transaction as card-not-present transactions have a slightly higher risk of fraud.

With PayPal, for example, all you need is a phone, tablet or computer and you can quickly log in to your account and go to the virtual terminal setting. This leads you to a screen similar to one you would see if you were entering your own information online for a purchase. Once the information is entered, you’ll receive confirmation. 

This simplicity and flexibility has made the virtual terminal an increasingly popular way for businesses of all types — not just mail order or eCommerce businesses — to accept payments. An increasing number of companies are now also offering USB card readers that connect directly to your terminal. These automatically take the card information and run it through your virtual terminal, keeping your transactions in the same location but charging you a lower rate since the card is present at the time. Some of these same companies offer pads which can collect customer signatures in the same way. Even with an external card reader, virtual terminals are usually not designed to accept advanced payment types, like contactless payments, from mobile wallets such as ApplePay. If you want to accept contactless payments, you’re better off getting a standard NFC-enabled credit card machine or credit card reader.

Virtual terminals can also take automated clearinghouse (ACH) payments for one-time or recurring transactions. These payments are processed in bunches, meaning the payment is usually received a little later. However, you aren’t subject to interchange fees for these payments.

Obviously, when making or accepting payments where credit card information is simply entered online, security is going to be of the utmost importance. It is highly recommended that you choose a payment provider that encrypts credit card data; this both reduces the risk of theft and the scope of the Payment Card Industry (PCI) compliance.

From there, you will generally have two options.

You can choose a non-validated solution which can cut down the risk of having data stolen. This is an affordable option that is offered by most processing companies, though these solutions are not defined as secure by the PCI. In other words, there is an increased chance that hackers could gain access to encryption keys which could eventually lead to a data breach.

The other option is a PCI point-to-point (P2PE) provider which meets all of the PCI standards and includes secure hardware. Processors that provide this level of protection must accept Merchant P2PE Implementation Responsibilities. Because of this added security, a much smaller number of processors offer this service (although that list is growing). If you are set on providing increased security, you will need to make sure you have hardware that meets these standards — you will also have to submit to regular security check-ups.

Merchant Services

When we talk about merchant services, what exactly do we mean? In simple terms, ‘merchant services’ is a broad term to describe the hardware and software products that make it possible to accept credit and debit card transactions. These companies and services help to connect the issuing bank (the bank that gave your customers their credit cards) and the merchant bank (the bank that is behind your merchant account). In the last couple of decades, this term has expanded to include much more than just your standard terminal scanner. The internet has opened the door for payments to be made online and those purchases can be tracked and managed from your computer or mobile device.

Merchant services providers are any businesses which accept payments (aside from just cash and checks). These can include credit and debit card processors, point of sale terminals, analytic software etc. There are a handful of different kinds of merchant services providers, including:

  • Merchant Account Providers: These providers can set you up with a merchant account and services that allow you to collect your money following a debit or credit card transaction. Some larger companies also come with direct processing services.
  • Payment Service Providers: Even though it’s advisable, it’s not essential to have a merchant account to process payments. Payment service providers, like the ubiquitous PayPal, don’t give you an ID number and are popular because they generally do not come with account fees or long-term contracts. These accounts can be frozen, sometimes without notice, and customer service can be sketchy. However, for smaller or seasonal businesses, payment service providers are a popular choice.
  • Payment Gateway Providers: Payment gateway providers represent a service provider that has emerged with increased popularity of eCommerce. These providers may or may not come with a merchant account. Some give you a choice of using their own merchant account or using a gateway with an existing account. Others only offer a gateway service, meaning you’ll have to have a merchant account from a third party.

When you’re looking at various card processors, there are a few things that you should keep an eye on. Perhaps most importantly you’ll want to research the company’s reputation. Processing payments is a crucial aspect of your business and an unreliable company can give you a lot of headaches (and affect your bottom line).

You’ll also want to compare the costs and potential fees that various processors implement. Square, for example, charges no monthly fee, which is yet another appeal for smaller or mid-sized companies. However, they also implement a 2.75% fee on transactions — if your business takes off and you’re suddenly processing a high number of transactions, those fees will add up and quickly wipe out any savings you’re receiving from not paying a monthly fee.

You’ll also want to doublecheck the compatibility of your processor. If, for instance, you’ve found a point of sale system that you are comfortable with, you’ll want to make sure that the processor integrates seamlessly without additional costs. If you’re forced to set up an aforementioned gateway, you could end up paying a large monthly fee.

To enable transactions, merchants will have to fill out an application. If you’re opening a merchant account, this process can take a little longer than going through a third-party processor. One of the reasons smaller and mid-sized merchants lean towards a third-processing account like Square is that you can be up and ready to take payments almost immediately. The price for that instant gratification, however, is an increased likelihood for potential account freezes later on.

When you’re in the process of picking out a processor, you’ll also want to pay close attention to transaction fees. The best merchant account providers usually offer what is referred to as interchange-plus pricing. This means that the provider takes the wholesale cost of the transaction and tacks on a small, standardized markup. This ensures an affordable and transparent pricing plan. It also means a slightly higher rate for transactions when a card isn’t physically present since those transactions have a higher frequency of fraud. Third-party processors sometimes provide a flat rate for all transactions — this is convenient and offers a simple way to quickly figure out your fees. However, it may not be the most cost-efficient in the grand scheme of things. A company like Square, which offers a flat rate for swiped and dipped transactions, also charges a slightly higher rate for key-in and eCommerce transactions.

There are a few other things you’ll want to watch out for when finalizing your decision about a merchant accounts provider. Along with the potential for account freezes or funding holds, keep an eye on how businesses handle chargebacks (where customers dispute a charge) and fraudulent charges in general. There are ways to mitigate these dangers, of course. You can use fraud management tools, including things like address verification services. Using a chip card terminal also dramatically cuts back on fraudulent charges.

Here are a few of our most highly recommended processing companies:

  • Fattmerchant: Fattmerchant is one of the best companies for eCommerce transactions. Its pricing is transparent without undisclosed fees. There is also a 0% markup, meaning you pay only the wholesale cost plus the monthly fee and a small authorization fee. Fattmerchant also has terrific customer service.
  • Dharma: Dharma provides a full array of processing services and also has a simple, affordable pricing structure without hidden fees. They exclusively use the interchange-plus format and are a particularly good choice for non-profits, as they offer a discount to those companies.
  • Helcim: For slightly large companies, Helcim is a very strong option. While offering a wide range of services, they have extremely competitive rates for companies that process more than $2500 a month. They also have very strong customer service and their fee structure is transparent and easy to understand.
  • Square: For companies that don’t provide a full-service merchant account, Square is the standard bearer. There is no monthly account fee and they offer free or low-cost readers. Square also doesn’t force you to sign up for a long-term contract or charge you for early termination.

Your POS System

Another way to process payments is through your POS or point of sale system. Point of sale systems have come a long way, especially in the past decade. Today, you can virtually run your entire business from one, simple device. With the influx of cloud-based systems, you can make snap decisions and check the status of your operation from anywhere with a wireless connection.

With so many options available, and with point of sale systems offering more and more features all the time, choosing the correct system to meet your needs is an important decision. The first thing you’ll need to decide is whether you want a system that is cloud-based or locally installed. Most companies have been moving toward cloud-based options for numerous reasons. First and foremost, it’s incredibly convenient. All of your data is automatically stored off-premise, so if something happens to your store or to your system, all of your payment, customer, and inventory information is still accessible. These systems are often extremely user-friendly as well, designed to be intuitive with very little training time needed. They tend to be sleek, modern, and visually appealing both to your customers and employees.

Many cloud-based systems also perform routine updates automatically, fixing bugs and adding new features so that you always have the most current software at your fingertips. Along these same lines, the best POS systems sync seamlessly to any number of integrations that can help your business in ways you may not have even considered before.

When you’re looking at purchasing a POS system, there are a number of factors to keep in mind. First and foremost, it’s likely that the cost of the POS hardware and software is going to play a large role. Some systems allow you to purchase your system and all necessary hardware upfront for a flat rate, allowing you to own the software. But if dropping a few thousand dollars isn’t something you’re comfortable with, the majority of point of sale companies offer monthly rates. A few companies, such as Square, offer a free version of their software that is generally suited for small operations, though most other POS software systems run anywhere from $39 to $99 a month for basic services while often offering advanced packages with additional features.

Let’s talk about some features you can expect to find in pretty much any good, modern point of sale system:

  • Inventory Management: Not only can you view all of your stock on hand, you can set your POS to alert you when certain products are running low or, even more conveniently, you can set the system to automatically reorder products when they hit a certain level. This can be an enormous time saver and, in most systems, inventory management can be accessed remotely. You can set up quick transfers across multiple locations and, in many cases, create and print your own purchase orders.
  • Employee Management: Likewise, your staff is easy to track and manage from your centralized POS station. You can set permissions and create alerts for suspicious transactions to cut down on fraud. Employees can be given unique codes when they log into the system and can view their hours and current schedules.
  • Customer Management: Many point of sale systems come with their own built-in loyalty programs or integrate with other companies for a small monthly fee. But these days, your POS can help with so much more when it comes to analytics and marketing. Most systems allow for customer data to be stored and easily searched. Customers can look up their own loyalty points and control their own profiles in some cases. More useful for business owners, however, is the ability for the system to analyze what items are being purchased by certain customers, assessing buying habits and creating personalized marketing campaigns that can be implemented with ease, helping to maximize profits. The same can be done with coupons, targeting customers to boost repeat business.

You will also want to do your research to see what systems specifically cater to your particular business. For example, if you’re opening a pizza shop, you may want to look for a system with built-in features that makes online ordering simple, or functions that allows customers to create a custom order which is then automatically sent to the kitchen, freeing up your employees. There are also niche POS systems for specific types of businesses. Quetzal, one of our highest-rated systems here at Merchant Maverick, is built for the retail industry with a significant bent towards shoe stores.

Many POS software systems have their own app store, like Clover, or integrate with scores of apps that might help your business out tremendously. If you’re technically savvy, most POS providers also give you access to an open API, meaning that you or a developer can create your own apps within the software.

When you’re doing your research there are a number of other features you’ll want to keep an eye on. Definitely check to see what features come in the form of add-ons which will increase your monthly fee. You will also want to make sure you have appropriate, compatible POS hardware. Several companies offer hardware packages that can be purchased directly through their websites.

A robust reporting feature should be available in most highly-rated systems and many offer their own eCommerce platforms, making it easy to set up your own website and sell online, all from your POS device.

Another key factor to research is what credit card processors are compatible with your system. While some offer a wide range of choices, integrating with most major companies, others lock you into a limited number of options or offer their own processing services for credit card payments, for better or worse.

You’ll also want to see what your system has in terms of an offline mode. Most point of sale systems have evolved to now offer at least some offline functionality, but what you can actually do in the case of an outage can vary. Many systems still function as normal, allowing you to process credit cards, encrypt transactions, and store the data to be run once the internet is restored.

It’s difficult to make a decision, but at Merchant Maverick, we’ve come across a number of point of sale systems that we would happily recommend depending on your business.

  • Shopkeep: Shopkeep is routinely on the top of our lists. This simple and reasonably priced system features everything you would expect in a point of sale system. It’s well suited for small to mid-sized retail shops and restaurants with a sleek design, excellent reporting and management tools, and terrific customer service.
  • Revel: For slightly larger restaurants or retail establishments, we often recommend Revel, a product that can manage multiple locations and large amounts of inventory with ease. Revel is intuitive and extremely robust with a top-notch kiosk function and Kitchen Display System.
  • Lightspeed: Lightspeed is another highly rated company and offers both a Retail and Restaurant product. Lightspeed has great customer service and is easy to set up while also providing intuitive front end and back end features. It also has an excellent and simple to use eCommerce platform.
  • ERPLY: ERPLY is one of the top retail point of sale systems that we’ve reviewed. One of its biggest features is the ability to integrate with most major credit card processors. It also has terrific shipping integrations and excellent customer management tools, particularly when it comes to loyalty.

Final Thoughts

There is obviously a lot to process when it comes to… well… credit card terminals and payment processing. If you’ve made it this far, hopefully you’re feeling a little more confident about your knowledge of credit card processing machines, virtual terminals, merchant services, point of sale systems, and what you should be looking for from the various companies that provide this technology. Make sure you have a good grasp on what each company charges for different transactions and what might be the best option for your type and size of business. Also don’t overlook things like a company’s customer service reputation. It’s a competitive market and you have the ability to make sure you end up with a credit card terminal and processing system that can best help your business thrive.

Interested in learning more? Download our free Beginner’s Guide To Payment Processing.

The post Complete Guide To Credit Card Machines And Terminals appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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