Double Dipping: The Hidden Costs of the Merchant Cash Loan

double dipping merchant cash advance short term loan

Merchant payday loans (MCAs) and short-term loans (STLs) are a fun way for retailers to gain access to cash for business purposes. Although these kinds of financing frequently obtain a bad rap, many legitimate business funders offer merchant payday loans and short term installment loans.

However, because these kinds of funding continue to be relatively recent and frequently misinterpreted, some funders still attempt to create extra profits by using unfair tactics.

Double dipping, the concept of having to pay interest on interest, is a such tactic. If you opt to borrow from the merchant cash loan or short-term loan company that practices double dipping, you might be missing out on lots of money.

What’s double dipping? And how can you cure it? Keep studying to discover!

Factor Rate Basics

To know double-dipping, you need to know how merchant cash loan and short-term loan borrowing charges are calculated.

Unlike traditional loans (also called installment loans), MCAs and STLs don’t charge interest. Rather, they calculate your fee utilizing a multiplier referred to as a factor rate (sometimes known as a &#8220buy rate&#8221 or &#8220flat fee&#8221).

Typically, the factor rate is going to be between x1.1 and x1.6. To calculate your repayment amount, you just multiply the factor rate from your borrowing amount. For instance, if you’re borrowing $10,000 as well as your factor rates are x1.35, you’ll have to pay back as many as $13,500 ($10,000 x 1.35 = $13,500). Unlike interest, which accrues with time, the repayment amount won’t change, it doesn’t matter how lengthy you are taking to pay back the main city.

Since you know the all inclusive costs of capital up-front, factor rates could be a very simple method of calculating borrowing charges&#8230if you’re simply borrowing one lump sum payment and pay back based on the schedule. However, factor rates can transport a concealed cost should you refinance the loan or advance.

What’s Double Dipping?

Double dipping is mainly an issue whenever you are requesting additional funds, refinancing, or renewing your merchant cash loan or short-term loan.

As mentioned above, double dipping is having to pay interest on interest. Whenever you refinance, your financial provider uses funds out of your new loan or advance to repay the total amount in your old loan or advance. Because products with factor rates possess a pre-determined payback amount, your funder might be utilizing a part of your brand-new funds to pay for lower the rest of the, delinquent, fee additionally towards the principal. By doing this, the funder is driving up the price of the brand new loan and you’re effectively having to pay interest on the top of great interest.

Confused? Possibly a diagram can help.

This is actually the amortization agenda for a $10,000 loan, having a factor rate of x1.35 along with a repayment term of six several weeks. Although short-term loans are usually paid back each week day, for brevity&#8217s sake, the chart shows roughly just how much goes toward the main and just how expensive is going toward charges monthly.

Payment Remaining
  Total Principal Interest Total Principal Interest
Month 1 $2,250 $1,262 $987 $11,250 $8,738 $2,513
Month 2 $2,250 $1,402 $848 $9,000 $7,336 $1,665
Month 3 $2,250 $1,557 $693 $6,750 $5,779 $972
Month 4 $2,250 $1,728 $522 $4,500 $4,051 $450
Month 5 $2,250 $1,919 $331 $2,250 $2,132 $119
Month 6 $2,250 $2,131 $119 $ $ $

Although it’s possible to calculate just how much goes toward the charge and just how expensive is going toward the main for every payment, since the total fee is pre-determined, borrowers typically do need to spend the money for full fee even when they pay back early (however, when the loan provider includes a prepayment discount, the customer could cut costs by repaying the borrowed funds before maturity).

In case your provider double dips, the issue is compounded. You&#8217ll need to pay charges on the top from the charges. Let&#8217s consider the web site provider that double dips versus one which forgives the rest of the interest once the loan is refinanced.

Let’s imagine, the merchant has requested yet another $5,000 after they’ve been having to pay the borrowed funds off for 3 several weeks. Rather of supplying a separate loan, the company consolidates your debt by having to pay from the old loan using the new loan. I’m presuming the factor rates are still x1.35.

Calculation NO Double Dipping Double Dipping Difference
Principal remaining: $4,051 $4,051
Interest remaining: $ $450
Total loan remaining: (principal + interest) $4,051 $4,501
New loan cost: (total loan remaining + new funds requested) $9,051 $9,501 $450
New total repayment amount: (new loan cost x factor rate &#8211 total loan remaining) $8,168 $8,325 $158
Total difference: $608

After three several weeks, the merchant has $4,051 remaining for that principal, and $450 residing in interest.

A loan provider who doesn&#8217t double dip will waive the eye, so to repay that old loan and provide the merchant yet another $5,000, the loan provider will need to issue financing of $9,057 ($4,051 + $5,000). However, a loan provider who does double dip will need to issue enough to pay for the main and interest additionally towards the $5,000, for any total new amount borrowed of $9,501 ($4,051 + $450 + $5,000).

The merchant using the double dipper has lost on $450 of delinquent interest, however that&#8217s only 1 / 2 of it&#8212they still need to pay interest around the new loan.

Presuming the factor rates are still x1.35, the borrowed funds without double dipping have a total repayment quantity of $8,168 ($9,057 x 1.35 &#8211 $4,015) following the old principal is compensated off. The loan with double dipping will add up to as many as $8,325 ($9,501 x 1.35 &#8211 $4,501) once the old principal and interest are compensated lower.

Since the interest wasn’t waived, the merchant within the double dipping situation will need to pay yet another $158 on the new loan. Such as the delinquent interest in the old loan, the merchant is losing $608 ($158 + $450) without other reason than having to pay interest on the top of great interest.

How Do You Avoid Double Dipping?

The only method to avoid double dipping is to locate a funder that doesn’t take part in double dipping before you borrow capital. After you have removed financing or advance, you’re dedicated to repaying the cash regardless of the terms.

Don&#8217t determine if your funder double-dips? Just ask! Your funder should have the ability to tell you set up charges are waived on renewal and supply an in depth introduction to the renewal process.

If you’re presently using a funder who double dips and also you need additional funds, you might want to turn to refinance with another funder. Although you might want to have a hit on interest fees, you won’t suffer from exactly the same issue in the future.

The publish Double Dipping: The Hidden Costs of the Merchant Cash Loan made an appearance first on Merchant Maverick.

“”