8 Insights around the Cashless Revolution in the Portland Food Carts

food truck cashless payments

Easy and streamlined towards the core, it’s no question the traditional art of street food vending has blossomed using the more and more fast pace of existence. The standard food cart fully launched into modern times with the development of mobile payment processing solutions provided by the likes of Square. With prices and equipment targeted at low-volume/low-ticket vendors, a mobile food revolution rapidly required shape.

Food carts as well as their mobile kin have proven a fertile testing ground with this new trend of payments. So much in fact, actually, that a number of forward-thinking food truck entrepreneurs have accepted into cashless territory within the last few years.

But how much has mobile processing truly caught on within the deeply cash-entrenched street food industry? Do food trucks along with other small, fast companies have to hop on the cashless bandwagon now, for anxiety about really missing out?

Curious to listen to the term around the (literal) street, I trigger late one morning towards the food carts within my hometown of Portland, Or for any self-led mobile payment processing tour. In situation you haven’t had the pleasure of the visit, the downtown Portland “pods” are collections of mostly permanent carts that both represent and reflect the city’s earthy, hipster quality. I wondered when the on-trend Rose City will be a prime place for that cashless revolution to achieve ground, particularly since it’s not illegal in Or to refuse cash. And I’d reach consume a Honkin’ Huge Burrito in my trouble. Yummy.

Listed here are the non-edible takeaways from my trip to the carts because they ready for the lunch hurry

1. Roughly nine out of ten carts in downtown Portland accept cards.

Cash is not technically king. I had been surprised initially, however recognized the majority of my fellow cart-goers were firmly within the card-friendly demographic: professionals, students, and also the periodic tourist. Still, this can be a pretty dramatic turnaround in the times of all cash.

2. Roughly nine out of ten carts that accept cards use Square.

Square now reigns supreme. I believed this percentage could be high, but didn’t imagine Square could be basically ubiquitous.

3. One owner stated he’d most likely still use Square even when he’s offered better rates, because his customers trust it.

Brand recognition continues to be key at this time, because handing your card to a complete stranger inside a small shack to become swiped right into a phone can continue to feel vulnerable. Seeing Square at cart after cart has produced an optimistic feedback loop of comfort using the whole system.

4. Most carts are convinced that half or even more of the transactions take presctiption cards, with lots of reporting 60-80%.

Downtown customers prefer plastic, for small transactions. As I felt the cashless revolution really sneaking up with this point, 80% continues to be nowhere near 100%.

5. Proprietors reported a couple “tap-and-pay” transactions each day, or no.

We have a lengthy approach to take before mobile wallets end up being the norm, despite Portland’s relatively high rate of NFC transactions and Square’s recent #PayFasterPortland campaign. I had been surprised, if perhaps because everybody around me was glued to some phone.

6. Some carts using Square still invoke a $.50 convenience fee for just about any card use (debit or credit) that takes over instantly or around $6.50.

Although charging as much as 4% convenience fee is legal in Or and 39 other states for charge card transactions, but certainly not for an atm card, carts don’t follow this rule and it’s not strictly enforced. Square swooped in and saved your day for low-volume/low-ticket carts by charging a set 2.75% per transaction. However in an ironic twist, some carts still use a fixed fee for their customers’ small transactions. In order to save the math, 4% of $6.50 is just $.26, and a pair of.75% of $6.50 is just $.18.

7. Some retailers feel safer taking cards.

One operator required away his tip jar and often refuses cash. His transactions are actually 95% card-based. Subtle changes could progressively cause more functionally cashless carts, even with no official policy in position.

8. Most proprietors stated they might never anticipate a scenario where they’d stop accepting cash.

A couple of really chuckled within my face after i requested.

When the crowds selected up, I had been feeling fairly certain that the Portland Food Carts could be able to escape longer in the cashless revolution. Yet even my morning’s walk-through town says the infrastructure has already been in position for any future cashless society, from corporate giants like Starbucks completely lower to neighborhood street vendors. And even though alternatives exist, Square has truly been the backbone from the transition of these smaller sized food vendors which were all-money in such recent memory.

I introduced money on my trip to the carts, but who owns Honkin’ Huge Burritos began using Square in 2014 after 22 years running a business. The next time, I’ll most likely use plastic too.

The publish 8 Insights around the Cashless Revolution in the Portland Food Carts made an appearance first on Merchant Maverick.

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